Question about Southern family life in the Antebellum Era

Harms88

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Location
North of the Wall & South of the Canucks
I've read a few novels where southern families play big roles. One thing that pops up is the idea that after the children of plantation families get married, many of them will still live with their parents. How often did this occur, where married children will remain on the family plantation with their spouses instead of moving off on their own?
 

Carol

Private
Joined
May 26, 2019
Location
Western North Carolina
The time period of the question and the addressing of southern families with "large plantations" is an interesting one. Allow me to focus on both. Northern and southern families, during this specific timeframe, were subject to local customs and traditions. The eldest son would most assuredly remain on an estate of large acreage. This was usually the custom of the day. The son and his family would remain to care for the parents as they age and to maintain and manage the estate. One cannot rely on this custom as fact due to many families simply didn't follow the "rules" so to speak. It was also very common for families to split the estate into smaller sections and have married children living on their inherited parcel. Female children not yet married would also remain until a marriage proposal was taken or various other reasons. The main point I wanted to get across is that families were very close for the most part. And, they remained close no matter the distance or the lack of.
 

Harms88

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Location
North of the Wall & South of the Canucks
The time period of the question and the addressing of southern families with "large plantations" is an interesting one. Allow me to focus on both. Northern and southern families, during this specific timeframe, were subject to local customs and traditions. The eldest son would most assuredly remain on an estate of large acreage. This was usually the custom of the day. The son and his family would remain to care for the parents as they age and to maintain and manage the estate. One cannot rely on this custom as fact due to many families simply didn't follow the "rules" so to speak. It was also very common for families to split the estate into smaller sections and have married children living on their inherited parcel. Female children not yet married would also remain until a marriage proposal was taken or various other reasons. The main point I wanted to get across is that families were very close for the most part. And, they remained close no matter the distance or the lack of.
So then it was much more common for the younger children to move away then the oldest son, except in cases of bachelors and bachelorettes then.
 

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