Pvt. Louis B. LaCount, Co. A 5th Wisconsin Vol. Inf.

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This was surprisingly easy - I found this CDV in a pile that included many more from Manitowoc, Wisconsin, showing a young man in what appears to be a four-button sack coat worn buttoned over a military-style vest. Notation in pencil identified him as one Louis LaCount, and a brief search turned him up in Co. A of the 5th Wisconsin Vol. Infantry! Here's more information regarding his service copied from Dennis Moore's Civil War Roster:

LA COUNT LOUIS

5th Wis. Vol. Inf. Company A Union Army
Enlisted as private 04/24/61 City of Manitowoc
History--Wounded at Battle of Mayre's Heights, Va.
05/03/63. Transfered to Veterans Reserve Corp.
04/10/64.
Mustered out 07/15/64. At the time of his enlistment,
LA COUNT was age 18 and single. He had dark hair and
stood 5'10". Manitowoc newspaper reported that
LA COUNT received a broken leg at Mayre Heights,
Battle of Fredericksburg, Va.
********
CIVIL WAR VETERAN DEAD
Dr. Louis B. Lacount, a Former Resident Here and a War Veteran Died at Merrill.
WAS MEMBER OF CO A. 5TH WIS.
Served through Almost the Whole Civil War Campaign and was Wounded at Chancellerville.
Announcement was received in the city Tuesday of the death at Merrill of Dr. Louis B. Lacount,
a former resident of this city, Monday. Death was due to infirmities incident to old age and
was hastened by a fall received April 10. Deceased was 60 years of age and is survived by a wife
and one daughter.
Louis B. Lacount was born in this city February 18, 1843, being a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Lacount
who resided on the Calumet road. He received his education in the schools here and remained in
the city until the time of the breakng out of the Civil war when he and five other brothers
enlisted in the service with the Union army. Louis Lacount became a member of Company A, which was
formed here and departed from the city with the troops when they left Sunday evening June 23, 1861,
going south to Milwaukee on the Goodrich steamer Comet. From Milwaukee the company went to Madison
where on July 13, of the same year they were mustered into the United States service at Camp
Randall as Co. A. Fifth Wisconsin Infantry.
Leaving Madison Mr. Lacount went through the entire compaign and was a member of the Light Brigade.
He rose to the rank of First Lieutenant and fought in many battles, principal among which were those
of Golden's Farm, Malvern Hill, Antietem and Fredericksburg. At Chancelorville he was struck below
the knee by a minie ball, which carried away the bone. During a greater part of the campaign he was
a tentmate of Judge J.S. Anderson and was at his side when he received the wound. After the war was
over the boys returned to this city and remained here until the death of the father when they became
residents of various other cities.

40977799_1432071465.jpg


Find-a-Grave added a postwar portrait of then-Dr. Loius B. LaCount plus a quoted obituary that gave additional details about his postwar career:

The doctor spent his early days here and was a general favorite. He was born at Manitowoc Feb 28, 1843, and when a young boy came to Chilton to live with his brother, Dr. David D. LaCount, remaining here until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Co. A. of the 5th Wis. Vol Inf. He served three years and was wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863. After he recovered sufficiently from his wounds he was transferred to Seminary Hospital, Georgetown, and served the balance of his time as clerk, dispensing drugs. He was mustered out at Washington, July 15, 1864, and then returned to Chilton. He worked at the cases in The Times office and took up the study of medicine with his brother, under whose tutorship he prepared to enter Rush Medical College at Chicago. He graduated Feb. 8, 1868, from that institution and shortly after entered into a co-partnership with Dr. J. M. Adams at Oconto, where he remained one year. From there he went to Shawano and remained twelve years, then moved to Merrill. His reputation as a soldier was above reproach and among professional men he also ranked high, both as a physician and surgeon. He was married April 12, 1869, at Green Bay to Olive LeClaire.

Not a bad investment of $2 at my favorite flea market!
 
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View attachment 156697

This was surprisingly easy - I found this CDV in a pile that included many more from Manitowoc, Wisconsin, showing a young man in what appears to be a four-button sack coat worn buttoned over a military-style vest. Notation in pencil identified him as one Louis LaCount, and a brief search turned him up in Co. A of the 5th Wisconsin Vol. Infantry! Here's more information regarding his service copied from Dennis Moore's Civil War Roster:

LA COUNT LOUIS

5th Wis. Vol. Inf. Company A Union Army
Enlisted as private 04/24/61 City of Manitowoc
History--Wounded at Battle of Mayre's Heights, Va.
05/03/63. Transfered to Veterans Reserve Corp.
04/10/64.
Mustered out 07/15/64. At the time of his enlistment,
LA COUNT was age 18 and single. He had dark hair and
stood 5'10". Manitowoc newspaper reported that
LA COUNT received a broken leg at Mayre Heights,
Battle of Fredericksburg, Va.
********
CIVIL WAR VETERAN DEAD
Dr. Louis B. Lacount, a Former Resident Here and a War Veteran Died at Merrill.
WAS MEMBER OF CO A. 5TH WIS.
Served through Almost the Whole Civil War Campaign and was Wounded at Chancellerville.
Announcement was received in the city Tuesday of the death at Merrill of Dr. Louis B. Lacount,
a former resident of this city, Monday. Death was due to infirmities incident to old age and
was hastened by a fall received April 10. Deceased was 60 years of age and is survived by a wife
and one daughter.
Louis B. Lacount was born in this city February 18, 1843, being a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Lacount
who resided on the Calumet road. He received his education in the schools here and remained in
the city until the time of the breakng out of the Civil war when he and five other brothers
enlisted in the service with the Union army. Louis Lacount became a member of Company A, which was
formed here and departed from the city with the troops when they left Sunday evening June 23, 1861,
going south to Milwaukee on the Goodrich steamer Comet. From Milwaukee the company went to Madison
where on July 13, of the same year they were mustered into the United States service at Camp
Randall as Co. A. Fifth Wisconsin Infantry.
Leaving Madison Mr. Lacount went through the entire compaign and was a member of the Light Brigade.
He rose to the rank of First Lieutenant and fought in many battles, principal among which were those
of Golden's Farm, Malvern Hill, Antietem and Fredericksburg. At Chancelorville he was struck below
the knee by a minie ball, which carried away the bone. During a greater part of the campaign he was
a tentmate of Judge J.S. Anderson and was at his side when he received the wound. After the war was
over the boys returned to this city and remained here until the death of the father when they became
residents of various other cities.

View attachment 156699

Find-a-Grave added a postwar portrait of then-Dr. Loius B. LaCount plus a quoted obituary that gave additional details about his postwar career:

The doctor spent his early days here and was a general favorite. He was born at Manitowoc Feb 28, 1843, and when a young boy came to Chilton to live with his brother, Dr. David D. LaCount, remaining here until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Co. A. of the 5th Wis. Vol Inf. He served three years and was wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863. After he recovered sufficiently from his wounds he was transferred to Seminary Hospital, Georgetown, and served the balance of his time as clerk, dispensing drugs. He was mustered out at Washington, July 15, 1864, and then returned to Chilton. He worked at the cases in The Times office and took up the study of medicine with his brother, under whose tutorship he prepared to enter Rush Medical College at Chicago. He graduated Feb. 8, 1868, from that institution and shortly after entered into a co-partnership with Dr. J. M. Adams at Oconto, where he remained one year. From there he went to Shawano and remained twelve years, then moved to Merrill. His reputation as a soldier was above reproach and among professional men he also ranked high, both as a physician and surgeon. He was married April 12, 1869, at Green Bay to Olive LeClaire.

Not a bad investment of $2 at my favorite flea market!
Men from this regiment captured General Ewell :

P2003829.gif


Report of Col. Thomas S. Allen, Fifth Wisconsin Infantry.

HDQRS. FIFTH WISCONSIN VOLUNTEERS,
April 15, 1865.
CAPT.; In compliance with circular of the 14th instant, I have the
honor to report:

First. That in the attack on the rebel lines near Fort Fisher on the
morning of the 2d instant my regiment was placed in the front line,
with the Thirty-seventh Massachusetts on my right. This line was
preceded by a light line of pioneers and sharpshooters. At the signal
"forward!" the line started promptly, cut through the abatis in a very
few moments, and soon carried the works in our front. My regiment
first planted its colors on the works. Without waiting to hold captured
property, although several guns were captured by my men, a flank fire
was opened both to the right and left, assisting the other brigades of this
and the Second Division in carrying their respective fronts. In the
afternoon of the same day, and during all the following, my regiment
joined in the general movement of the brigade.

Among the names especially deserving of honorable mention are those
of the gallant Capt. John B. Doughty, who was killed while urging
his men though the abatis; Capt. Henry Curran and Lieut. E. R.
Jones did good service; Capt. Thomas Flint captured and destroyed
two wagons loaded with valuable stores; Capt. William Bremmer captured
and destroyed, three wagons, also loaded; Lieut.-Col. Bull
was one of the first officers to enter the works. The color-sergeant,
Robert H. Langton, and color-corporal, August Franz, cannot be too
highly praised for their energy and daring. Sergt. James Young, of
Company D, with some fifteen or twenty men, pushed ahead to the
South Side road and fired on a train of cars which was passing and cut
the telegraph wires for some distance, showing that they were the first to
strike the road, since cars could not run had the road been struck previously.

Our loss this day was 14 killed and 67 wounded.

Second. In the movement of the 6th instant an attack was made on the
left of the rebel line near Little Sailor's Creek. My regiment was
ordered forward in line of battle, and I was instructed to guide on Third
Division. The Third Division not starting in time, I pushed ahead, under
orders of Col. Edwards, down the hill and across the swamp into
which the men plunged recklessly, some of them up to their arm-pits.
Having reformed the line, which had become broken by the passage of
this obstacle, I threw out Company G, under command of Capt.
Henry Curran, and Company C, under command of Lieut. E. R.
Jones, as skirmishers. This line advanced rapidly, losing sixteen men
by a fire from our left flank. I then ordered the whole line forward,
suffering heavily from the same fire. The skirmishers, re-enforced by
a portion of my line, swung around to the left and took the rebels in
flank, causing for a moment a general stampede. Seeing a general
officer and staff making to the rear and left, Capt. Curran sent
forward several men from his right to watch their movement. These
men soon got into their rear, when, seeing farther retreat useless,
Lieut. Gen. Ewell surrendered himself and staff to Sergt. Angus
Cameron, in charge of squad, remarking that the surrendered himself
and 5,000 men, and inquired for an officer; none being present at the
moment he surrendered unconditionally. Soon after a squad of cavalry
came up and claimed the prisoners and took possession of them. Our
loss was 15 killed and 72 wounded.

The names of the six men who captured Gen. Ewell are, Sergt.
Angus Cameron, Corpl. Charles Roughan, Corpl. August Brocker, and
Private John W. Davis, of Company C; Corpl. John J. Cosat and
Private H. W. True, Company I.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. S. ALLEN,
Col., Cmdg. Regt.

[Capt. T. G. COLT,
Acting Assitant Adjutant-Gen.]


Source: Official Records
CHAP. LVIII.] THE APPOMATTOX CAMPAIGN. PAGE 952-95
[Series I. Vol. 46. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 95.]
 

Keiri

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If you find any who were in the 17th, that's what I research and I would love to see anything.
 
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102_1352.JPG
102_1353.JPG
102_1354.JPG
View attachment 188049 View attachment 188049
Specifically interested in Co K but interested in anything to do with them. Photos, diaries, letters...
Men from this regiment captured General Ewell :

View attachment 156700

Report of Col. Thomas S. Allen, Fifth Wisconsin Infantry.

HDQRS. FIFTH WISCONSIN VOLUNTEERS,
April 15, 1865.
CAPT.; In compliance with circular of the 14th instant, I have the
honor to report:

First. That in the attack on the rebel lines near Fort Fisher on the
morning of the 2d instant my regiment was placed in the front line,
with the Thirty-seventh Massachusetts on my right. This line was
preceded by a light line of pioneers and sharpshooters. At the signal
"forward!" the line started promptly, cut through the abatis in a very
few moments, and soon carried the works in our front. My regiment
first planted its colors on the works. Without waiting to hold captured
property, although several guns were captured by my men, a flank fire
was opened both to the right and left, assisting the other brigades of this
and the Second Division in carrying their respective fronts. In the
afternoon of the same day, and during all the following, my regiment
joined in the general movement of the brigade.

Among the names especially deserving of honorable mention are those
of the gallant Capt. John B. Doughty, who was killed while urging
his men though the abatis; Capt. Henry Curran and Lieut. E. R.
Jones did good service; Capt. Thomas Flint captured and destroyed
two wagons loaded with valuable stores; Capt. William Bremmer captured
and destroyed, three wagons, also loaded; Lieut.-Col. Bull
was one of the first officers to enter the works. The color-sergeant,
Robert H. Langton, and color-corporal, August Franz, cannot be too
highly praised for their energy and daring. Sergt. James Young, of
Company D, with some fifteen or twenty men, pushed ahead to the
South Side road and fired on a train of cars which was passing and cut
the telegraph wires for some distance, showing that they were the first to
strike the road, since cars could not run had the road been struck previously.

Our loss this day was 14 killed and 67 wounded.

Second. In the movement of the 6th instant an attack was made on the
left of the rebel line near Little Sailor's Creek. My regiment was
ordered forward in line of battle, and I was instructed to guide on Third
Division. The Third Division not starting in time, I pushed ahead, under
orders of Col. Edwards, down the hill and across the swamp into
which the men plunged recklessly, some of them up to their arm-pits.
Having reformed the line, which had become broken by the passage of
this obstacle, I threw out Company G, under command of Capt.
Henry Curran, and Company C, under command of Lieut. E. R.
Jones, as skirmishers. This line advanced rapidly, losing sixteen men
by a fire from our left flank. I then ordered the whole line forward,
suffering heavily from the same fire. The skirmishers, re-enforced by
a portion of my line, swung around to the left and took the rebels in
flank, causing for a moment a general stampede. Seeing a general
officer and staff making to the rear and left, Capt. Curran sent
forward several men from his right to watch their movement. These
men soon got into their rear, when, seeing farther retreat useless,
Lieut. Gen. Ewell surrendered himself and staff to Sergt. Angus
Cameron, in charge of squad, remarking that the surrendered himself
and 5,000 men, and inquired for an officer; none being present at the
moment he surrendered unconditionally. Soon after a squad of cavalry
came up and claimed the prisoners and took possession of them. Our
loss was 15 killed and 72 wounded.

The names of the six men who captured Gen. Ewell are, Sergt.
Angus Cameron, Corpl. Charles Roughan, Corpl. August Brocker, and
Private John W. Davis, of Company C; Corpl. John J. Cosat and
Private H. W. True, Company I.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. S. ALLEN,
Col., Cmdg. Regt.

[Capt. T. G. COLT,
Acting Assitant Adjutant-Gen.]


Source: Official Records
CHAP. LVIII.] THE APPOMATTOX CAMPAIGN. PAGE 952-95
[Series I. Vol. 46. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 95.]
102_1352.JPG
102_1352.JPG
102_1353.JPG
102_1353.JPG
102_1353.JPG
View attachment 188049 View attachment 188049
102_1352.JPG
102_1353.JPG
View attachment 188049
102_1352.JPG
102_1353.JPG
View attachment 188049
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View attachment 188049
 
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Messages
507
Sorry for all the pics. New at this stuff lol August Gaylord ,wife and family.(cdv's) also his signature on 18th Wis. Appointment with Lucious Fairchild Iron Brigade fame and Gov. Lewis.
 
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Keiri

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501
no problem! always nice to see mr. fairchild. What are you studying/interested in?
 
Joined
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Messages
507
no problem! always nice to see mr. fairchild. What are you studying/interested in?
Hi Keiri, I am a Civil War collector and look for mainly Wisconsin items but will buy other military items if the price is right or if the item has unique historical value. I have quite a bit of G.A.R. items also. My wife started my hobby by buying me a CW sword for a Christmas 30 yrs. ago . How about you what are your interests ?
 

Keiri

Sergeant
Joined
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Messages
501
I originally got interested in the 17th Wisconsin when I came across the autobiography (as dictated to his son) of one of the soldiers who happened to be an ancestor of my fiance. I was researching his entire family and became frankly obsessed. I read everything I could on the unit, including all the letters and diaries I could find. I researched the families of all of the guys, and tried to fill in the blanks of their personal histories. My goal was to write something about them, but I have been stuck for a while with feeling like putting words in their mouth vs. just writing research about them - that whole choice - is difficult for me.
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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It does make you a little happy to be living in 2018, reading his obit. ' Infirmities due to old age ;, and he was sixty, when he died! Goodness! Had to read that twice!

Love seeing the old portraits tracked down- always wonder how they all become orphaned in the first place? Someone sold them, or sent them to an auction when a household broke up, probably a relative. I know not everyone is smitten by history but it always amazes me, how so many got away from families.
 
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
507
I originally got interested in the 17th Wisconsin when I came across the autobiography (as dictated to his son) of one of the soldiers who happened to be an ancestor of my fiance. I was researching his entire family and became frankly obsessed. I read everything I could on the unit, including all the letters and diaries I could find. I researched the families of all of the guys, and tried to fill in the blanks of their personal histories. My goal was to write something about them, but I have been stuck for a while with feeling like putting words in their mouth vs. just writing research about them - that whole choice - is difficult for me.
Hi, I know nothing about writing but maybe you could tell their story like Micheal Shaara"s book " The Killer Angels" or " Cold Mountain " You have the basic history and you can fill in the blanks. Good luck on this . I know a couple of Wis. CW collectors and I can see if they have more info on the 17th. Where was Co.K recruited from ? I think that there was a lot Irish in that regiment. Last thought , Have you checked with the Veterans Museum ? Greg
 
Joined
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Messages
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It does make you a little happy to be living in 2018, reading his obit. ' Infirmities due to old age ;, and he was sixty, when he died! Goodness! Had to read that twice!

Love seeing the old portraits tracked down- always wonder how they all become orphaned in the first place? Someone sold them, or sent them to an auction when a household broke up, probably a relative. I know not everyone is smitten by history but it always amazes me, how so many got away from families.
Hi, Some people have no interest in their history and they are willing to part with these items . For me I enjoy finding a photo and then hunting down the history of it . In the last month I have been able to find the identity of 4 photos and 1 sword . The sword I was able to re-unite with its 99 yr. old owner. Several times I have asked people " Do you really want to sell this ?" Have a Great day ! Greg
 
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D. C. Yakey and Whipple's Patent Cap A.jpg


Hi Keiri, I am a Civil War collector and look for mainly Wisconsin items but will buy other military items if the price is right or if the item has unique historical value. I have quite a bit of G.A.R. items also...
Hi, Some people have no interest in their history and they are willing to part with these items . For me I enjoy finding a photo and then hunting down the history of it . In the last month I have been able to find the identity of 4 photos and 1 sword . The sword I was able to re-unite with its 99 yr. old owner. Several times I have asked people " Do you really want to sell this ?" Have a Great day ! Greg
Hi, Greg,

Both you and @Keiri may be interested in this fellow I found at a flea market and did much as you suggest! His name is David C. Yakey who mustered in at Eau Claire in the 25th Wisc.; I've posted him before in a separate thread and others, but if you haven't read the full story, here it is: https://www.civilwartalk.com/threads/sgt-david-c-yakey-and-whipples-patent-cap.81148/
 
Last edited:

Keiri

Sergeant
Joined
Aug 11, 2015
Messages
501
Hi, I know nothing about writing but maybe you could tell their story like Micheal Shaara"s book " The Killer Angels" or " Cold Mountain " You have the basic history and you can fill in the blanks. Good luck on this . I know a couple of Wis. CW collectors and I can see if they have more info on the 17th. Where was Co.K recruited from ? I think that there was a lot Irish in that regiment. Last thought , Have you checked with the Veterans Museum ? Greg
Yea - I've got plenty of stuff, just in case more came along I'd love to see it. They were from the Waupaca/clintonville/bear creek area (north woods) and K was the non-Irish part of the regiment. They were mostly Germans and Native Americans.
 
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Messages
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View attachment 188197





Hi, Greg,

Both you and @Keiri may be interested in this fellow I found at a flea market and did much as you suggest! His name is David C. Yakey who mustered in at Eau Claire in the 25th Wisc.; I've posted him before in a separate thread and others, but if you haven't read the full story, here it is: https://www.civilwartalk.com/threads/sgt-david-c-yakey-and-whipples-patent-cap.81148/
Hi, Before I read the post I was going to ask "whats with the hat ? Were these hats used during the with Mexico ? Nice tin type ! Its great that you went and found his burial site and pay your respect. Come to think of it I have a CDV of Col. Rusk and future Gov. of Wis from the 25th. If these pictures could only talk ......
 
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Hi, Before I read the post I was going to ask "whats with the hat ? Were these hats used during the with Mexico ? Nice tin type ! Its great that you went and found his burial site and pay your respect. Come to think of it I have a CDV of Col. Rusk and future Gov. of Wis from the 25th. If these pictures could only talk ......
No, they were a wartime "innovation"; here's a little more about them, an illustration of a surviving example and a brief explanation courtesy of major bill: https://www.civilwartalk.com/threads/whipples-patent-cap.81156/

Edit - Here's another entry about them: https://www.civilwartalk.com/threads/the-famous-kepi-hat.73381/#post-477777

The fellow wearing this one is likely a New Hampshire militiaman:
32055v-jpg.jpg
 
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