Restricted Protesters call UNC’s Confederate monument racist

CSA Today

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In Charles Kuralt's wonderful photo narrative book Southerners, he had this to say about the war and North Carolina in particular. Now remember that Kuralt was no reactionary Lost Causer, nor was he anybody's conservative, but he did come to know America and Americans as well as anybody through his career.

"In my mind, General William Tecumseh Sherman is and always will be the number one villain of the South. In 196, during the Bicentennial, I went along the route of Sherman's march from Atlanta to the sea. I found people in Georgia who still hate him, who were still willing to talk bitterly about him. You can still see some signs of his march. You have to look, but those lonely chimneys are still standing there, where houses used to be. The Southerners named those things 'Sherman's Sentinels'.

Sherman attacked and burned people's homes, and it was precisely that which caused people to hate him so. Oh, how unnecessary it was. Why burn the homes of innocent families? Why do that? Of course, at the time, it seemed to Sherman the only choice, like dropping the bomb on Hiroshima. The war had to be won. It was far, far later, many years after the war, when Sher,an was thinking back, that he said 'War is Hell.'

The unlucky Georgians who lived along his path in 1864 already had found out about that.

I belonged briefly to a fraternity at Chapel Hill. They kept the records of everybody who'd ever been a member. I remember going up to the secret room, where they kept all these records, handwritten. And in the book they showed me where they write a line or two about what happened to you in your life, and when you died. In the class of 1863, there were about seven boys in the fraternity. Two years later, six of them were dead. Those six boys were going to be the leaders of North Carolina. They were the college generation, and that generation was decimated. "Decimated," though, isn't the word, because that just means the death of one in ten."


Let the Reverend use his own money to put up a statue to his own heroes. Fair enough. But leave that one alone.

What’s so galling about the “Rev” is that he is not satisfied to erect a plaque on the grounds of UNC, he wants to attach his plaque to “Silent Sam.” This is the same kook demanding the removal of the carvings on Stone Mountain and rumored to want to do the same for the slavers on Mt Rushmore.

“There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public...Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs."
Booker T. Washington, The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 1, ed. Louis R. Harlan (Chicago: University of Illinois Press: 1972), p. 430.
 

CMWinkler

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docsouth.unc.edu

Inscriptions:
Left: ERECTED UNDER THE AUSPICES / OF THE / NORTH CAROLINA DIVISION / OF THE UNITED DAUGHTERS OF / THE CONFEDERACY / AIDED BY THE ALUMNI OF / THE UNIVERSITY

Right: TO THE SONS OF THE UNIVERSITY / WHO ENTERED THE WAR OF 1861 – 65 / IN ANSWER TO THE CALL OF THEIR / COUNTRY AND WHOSE LIVES / TAUGHT THE LESSON OF / THEIR GREAT COMMANDER THAT / DUTY IS THE SUBLIMEST WORD / IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Boy, now THAT's racist an inflammatory. No wonder they want to get rid of it. While we're at it, we ought to strike the names of any UNC student who ever served the Confederacy and forbid forever any mention of them. After all, we certainly wouldn't want anyone's feelings to be hurt if those names might ever be uttered.
 

Robtweb1

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It's a sad thing that these people keep at this sort of thing. I read Barber's remarks and wonder how he can recieve any credence at all.

“Somebody might sneak over here at night and worship at it, and then go to the Legislature and roll back voting rights and act as though it’s all right, because they have dismissed its history,”

Amazing. :banghead:
 

Karen Lips

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Protesters call UNC’s Confederate monument racist

Jun. 02, 2013 @ 10:40 PM
By KEITH UPCHURCH; [email protected]; 919-419-6612
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Zaina Alsous (R) of the real Silent Sam coalition and State NAACP President William Barber are standing at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
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Blanche Brown (L) gives flowers to Jennifer Weaver at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
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Katie Akin (L) and Cassandra Hartblay are standing at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
CHAPEL HILL —
CHAPEL HILL – UNC’s monument to alumni killed in the Civil War got a verbal pounding Sunday from speakers who said it represents a racist past that continues in some places today.
The demonstration drew about 100 people to the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC campus near Franklin Street, marking exactly 100 years since it was unveiled.
It was erected in 1913 as a memorial to the 321 alumni killed in the Civil War and to all students who joined the Confederate States Army.
“The reality is that Sam has never been silent,” state NAACP President William Barber told the crowd. “He speaks racism. He speaks hurt to women – particularly black women. And he continues just by his presence to attempt to justify the legacy of the religion of racism.”
Barber said the statue doesn’t include an explanation of what he called its dark history.
“These students [at the demonstration] are right to say that if it’s going to be here, at least name it, because you can’t cast out a demon until you name it.”
“You can’t let this altar to the sin of racism and evil [continue] without being called what it is, and for what it stands. Otherwise, it speaks a language that is contrary to our common humanity. Only the truth can set you free.”
Barber suggested that the monument could be a bad influence on lawmakers.
“Somebody might sneak over here at night and worship at it, and then go to the Legislature and roll back voting rights and act as though it’s all right, because they have dismissed its history,” he said, alluding to the Republican-led General Assembly’s agenda that he calls “regressive.”
“We can’t be silent in the face of a mean-spirited public policy that talks about entitlements in very race-based terms,” Barber said.

For the rest: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local...esters-call-UNC-s-Confederate-monument-racist
It just goes to show the ignorance that is out there about the civil war and why the common southern soldier was fighting. From their perspective, they were fighting to protect their homeland.
 

DaveBrt

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The NAACP is also leading weekly demonstrations against the newly elected Republican governor of NC in next door Raleigh.
 
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