Restricted Protesters call UNC’s Confederate monument racist

CMWinkler

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Protesters call UNC’s Confederate monument racist

Jun. 02, 2013 @ 10:40 PM
By KEITH UPCHURCH; [email protected]; 919-419-6612
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Zaina Alsous (R) of the real Silent Sam coalition and State NAACP President William Barber are standing at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
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Blanche Brown (L) gives flowers to Jennifer Weaver at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
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Katie Akin (L) and Cassandra Hartblay are standing at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
CHAPEL HILL —
CHAPEL HILL – UNC’s monument to alumni killed in the Civil War got a verbal pounding Sunday from speakers who said it represents a racist past that continues in some places today.
The demonstration drew about 100 people to the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC campus near Franklin Street, marking exactly 100 years since it was unveiled.
It was erected in 1913 as a memorial to the 321 alumni killed in the Civil War and to all students who joined the Confederate States Army.
“The reality is that Sam has never been silent,” state NAACP President William Barber told the crowd. “He speaks racism. He speaks hurt to women – particularly black women. And he continues just by his presence to attempt to justify the legacy of the religion of racism.”
Barber said the statue doesn’t include an explanation of what he called its dark history.
“These students [at the demonstration] are right to say that if it’s going to be here, at least name it, because you can’t cast out a demon until you name it.”
“You can’t let this altar to the sin of racism and evil [continue] without being called what it is, and for what it stands. Otherwise, it speaks a language that is contrary to our common humanity. Only the truth can set you free.”
Barber suggested that the monument could be a bad influence on lawmakers.
“Somebody might sneak over here at night and worship at it, and then go to the Legislature and roll back voting rights and act as though it’s all right, because they have dismissed its history,” he said, alluding to the Republican-led General Assembly’s agenda that he calls “regressive.”
“We can’t be silent in the face of a mean-spirited public policy that talks about entitlements in very race-based terms,” Barber said.

For the rest: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local...esters-call-UNC-s-Confederate-monument-racist
 

CMWinkler

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NAACP protests UNC's 'Silent Sam' Confederate statue

Posted: Jun 02, 2013 11:11 AM CST Updated: Jun 03, 2013 7:19 AM CST
By WNCN Staff

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CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
NAACP President Rev. Dr. William J. Barber joined a protest Sunday afternoon about the Confederate statue at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
The statue, erected in 1913 near Franklin Street, is commonly known as Silent Sam because the soldier carries a rifle but no ammunition.
The protest was Sunday at the statue as part of the Real Silent Sam movement.
The NAACP said in a news release that The Real Silent Sam Committee "has campaigned over the past two years for a plaque telling the true history of the Confederate soldier and the role that the leadership of the University of North Carolina played in the end of the First Reconstruction and the violent white supremacist backlash against Fusion, multi-racial politics of the late 1800s.

For the rest: http://www.wncn.com/story/22479856/naacp-to-protest-uncs-silent-sam-confederate-statue
 

Michael t

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Maybe if we ignored them they would go away... Instead we put their faces in a newspaper or give them their 15 minutes of fame which only encourages them to make more noise.. We are great enablers that way....Expired Image Removed
 

CMWinkler

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I posted this for a couple of reasons. The first was because this is yet another example of revisionist history and selective memory at work, and, secondly, the second article posted talks about the "Fusion" movement. I thought I knew, at least, a bit about the war and Reconstruction and I've never heard of it. So.... I looked it up.

Here it is:

Fusion Politics

During the 1890s, a national phenomenon called Fusion politics united political parties. In some western states the Populist (or People’s Party) and the Democratic Party united, but in North Carolina the movement, spearheaded by agricultural leader Marion Butler (1863-1938), combined the Populist and Republican parties. In the presidential election of 1896, the Populist Party found itself ironically backing the Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) at the national level, while joining forces with Republicans at the state level.
The term Fusion is somewhat misleading, for it implies a merger. The parties maintained separate executive committees and merely cooperated whenever feasible by forming joint electoral tickets. In the Tar Heel State, the Populist and Republican parties disagreed on certain national issues, such as the tariff, the gold standard, and silver coinage. The parties, however, agreed on many state issues, including education, voting rights, and restoring the charter of the Farmers’ Alliance.
It became apparent in 1892, when Democrat Elias Carr (1839-1900) won only a plurality of 48.3% votes in the three-way race for governor, that Democrats were in trouble. Rather than entertain growing Populist demands for economic reform, county self-rule, and increased educational funding, the Democratic legislature spitefully repealed the charter of the North Carolina Farmers’ Alliance (which was blamed for the emergence of the Populist Party) and instituted tighter restrictions on the election process.
The undemocratic County Government Act of 1877 already hampered elections. By means of this act, Democrats maintained power over local governments. The law allowed the legislature to appoint local justices, and permitted these appointed judges to choose county commissioners. Though other county offices remained elective, the law helped maintain Democratic control of “purse strings” and prevent blacks or Republicans from gaining local power.
In addition to the political chicanery of the Democrats, a steady currency deflation ruined the financial dreams of many farmers since the 1870s. As farmers’ acquired debt, they demanded free coinage of silver to inflate crop prices. This desire, combined with an economic depression that started under the presidential administration of Democrat and gold supporter Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), fueled the intensifying disenchantment of farmers with the Democratic Party.
Prior to 1894, Marion Butler, chairman of the state People’s Party and editor of The Caucasian, held secret meetings with black and white Republican leaders, including former black Congressman Henry P. Cheatham (1857-1935) and future Governor Daniel L. Russell (1845-1908). Finally, Butler and other Populists met with Republicans on July 30, 1894. Among the Republicans present were silver leader John J. Mott (1834-1919) and Congressman Richmond Pearson (1852-1923). They helped the two parties’ leadership reach a tentative agreement that divided political offices according to the parties’ electoral support in the General Assembly districts; a similar agreement was also made for U.S. House of Representative seats. The parties’ leadership also divided statewide offices to ensure that, for any office, either a Republican or Populist (not both) would run against a Democrat.

For the rest: http://www.northcarolinahistory.org/commentary/58/entry
 

CSA Today

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Protesters call UNC’s Confederate monument racist

Jun. 02, 2013 @ 10:40 PM
By KEITH UPCHURCH; [email protected]; 919-419-6612
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Zaina Alsous (R) of the real Silent Sam coalition and State NAACP President William Barber are standing at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
Expired Image Removed
Blanche Brown (L) gives flowers to Jennifer Weaver at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
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Katie Akin (L) and Cassandra Hartblay are standing at the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC Campus, during a demonstration and community discussion about the statue, in Chapel Hill. The Herald-Sun | Bernard Thomas
CHAPEL HILL —
CHAPEL HILL – UNC’s monument to alumni killed in the Civil War got a verbal pounding Sunday from speakers who said it represents a racist past that continues in some places today.
The demonstration drew about 100 people to the Silent Sam Confederate Monument on the UNC campus near Franklin Street, marking exactly 100 years since it was unveiled.
It was erected in 1913 as a memorial to the 321 alumni killed in the Civil War and to all students who joined the Confederate States Army.
“The reality is that Sam has never been silent,” state NAACP President William Barber told the crowd. “He speaks racism. He speaks hurt to women – particularly black women. And he continues just by his presence to attempt to justify the legacy of the religion of racism.”
Barber said the statue doesn’t include an explanation of what he called its dark history.
“These students [at the demonstration] are right to say that if it’s going to be here, at least name it, because you can’t cast out a demon until you name it.”
“You can’t let this altar to the sin of racism and evil [continue] without being called what it is, and for what it stands. Otherwise, it speaks a language that is contrary to our common humanity. Only the truth can set you free.”
Barber suggested that the monument could be a bad influence on lawmakers.
“Somebody might sneak over here at night and worship at it, and then go to the Legislature and roll back voting rights and act as though it’s all right, because they have dismissed its history,” he said, alluding to the Republican-led General Assembly’s agenda that he calls “regressive.”
“We can’t be silent in the face of a mean-spirited public policy that talks about entitlements in very race-based terms,” Barber said.

For the rest: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local...esters-call-UNC-s-Confederate-monument-racist

Betcha the Reverend, and his committee, didn’t mention that it was the Democrats that led “violent white supremacists against Fusion [alliance of Republicans and Populists], multi –racial politics of the late 1800.”

“There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public...Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs."

Booker T. Washington, The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 1, ed. Louis R. Harlan (Chicago: University of Illinois Press: 1972), p. 430.
 

RobertP

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One wonders if the NAACP has outlived it's usefulness, I mean, is this all they have to do?
Probably a good way to kick off a fund raising drive. But it is nice to see that the NAACP has solved the poverty, crime, single motherhood, drug and educational failure problems in North Carolina and can now concentrate on things like this protest.
 

CSA Today

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Every college has at least a hundred...

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You would find far more than a hundred just among the imported faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill. Even as far back as the 1950s there was a red tinge to the “Carolina Blue” at university.

"A people separated from their heritage are easily persuaded. If you erase the symbols of a people's heritage, you erase their public identity and memory, and then you can persuade them in whatever you want."

Karl Marx
 

CMWinkler

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At UNC, Silent Sam romanticizes the Civil War and the old South

by Will Huntsberry @willhuntsberry
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Photo by Will Huntsberry
Demonstrators want a plaque installed at Silent Sam acknowledging the statue is a monument to white dominance.
Write to the editor
Sam, a Confederate soldier, stands tall and stoic, rifle across his chest, in the middle of the upper quad at UNC-Chapel Hill. Made of stone, he is in full uniform, is wearing shoes, does not appear to have diarrhea and is not at all bedraggled, which makes him unlike an actual Confederate soldier during the Civil War.
Sunday was his 100th birthday. But the 65 or so people that came to the celebration weren't there to honor Sam. A female student, who was lightly bedraggled, walked around handing out multi-colored daisies asking, "Would you like to commemorate the death of the old South?"
Sam was erected in 1913 by the Daughters of the Confederacy to commemorate 321 UNC alumni who died during the war and to remember "duty is the sublimest word in the English language," as his inscription reads. Demonstrators who attended Sunday's event would rather Sam be remembered as a monument to the post-Reconstruction South, a time when whites consolidated power by establishing Jim Crow laws.
Sunday's demonstration was organized by Real Silent Sam and Sacrificial Poets, two organizations that in recent years have protested the statue through performance art. (Listen to audio from the event below.)

For the rest: http://www.indyweek.com/indyweek/at...vil-war-and-the-old-south/Content?oid=3649268
 

CSA Today

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Looks like the Reverend is eating pretty good these days.

He is referred to by the irreverent in the state as “two tons of fun.”

“There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public...Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs."

Booker T. Washington, The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 1, ed. Louis R. Harlan (Chicago: University of Illinois Press: 1972), p. 430.
 

RobertP

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He is referred to by the irreverent in the state as “two tons of fun.”
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Battalion

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I want to install a plaque at the Lincoln statue at Tredegar. And while I'm at it a plaque at all the John Brown and Wm. T. Sherman statues around the country.
Not really...

What this assorted bunch of communists, socialists, and race baiters want to do is the equivalent of defacing a gravestone in a cemetery. The monument is in honor of those who died in a war.
 

Bonny Blue Flag

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Is it because it is a Confederate soldier? Hopefully some will open their eyes and come to understand that what is viewed as the good and the bad in our history is exactly that....our history. You cannot hide parts of history under a rock and claim to have learned it.

The more we openly engage in all sides of our country's history the sooner we will benefit from i's lessons.

To be a proponant of selective history lessons....learning only what we want based on today's views of the past.

Dangerous.

--BBF
 

RobertP

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He is referred to by the irreverent in the state as “two tons of fun.”

“There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public...Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs."

Booker T. Washington, The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 1, ed. Louis R. Harlan (Chicago: University of Illinois Press: 1972), p. 430.

In Charles Kuralt's wonderful photo narrative book Southerners, he had this to say about the war and North Carolina in particular. Now remember that Kuralt was no reactionary Lost Causer, nor was he anybody's conservative, but he did come to know America and Americans as well as anybody through his career.

"In my mind, General William Tecumseh Sherman is and always will be the number one villain of the South. In 196, during the Bicentennial, I went along the route of Sherman's march from Atlanta to the sea. I found people in Georgia who still hate him, who were still willing to talk bitterly about him. You can still see some signs of his march. You have to look, but those lonely chimneys are still standing there, where houses used to be. The Southerners named those things 'Sherman's Sentinels'.

Sherman attacked and burned people's homes, and it was precisely that which caused people to hate him so. Oh, how unnecessary it was. Why burn the homes of innocent families? Why do that? Of course, at the time, it seemed to Sherman the only choice, like dropping the bomb on Hiroshima. The war had to be won. It was far, far later, many years after the war, when Sher,an was thinking back, that he said 'War is Hell.'

The unlucky Georgians who lived along his path in 1864 already had found out about that.

I belonged briefly to a fraternity at Chapel Hill. They kept the records of everybody who'd ever been a member. I remember going up to the secret room, where they kept all these records, handwritten. And in the book they showed me where they write a line or two about what happened to you in your life, and when you died. In the class of 1863, there were about seven boys in the fraternity. Two years later, six of them were dead. Those six boys were going to be the leaders of North Carolina. They were the college generation, and that generation was decimated. "Decimated," though, isn't the word, because that just means the death of one in ten."


Let the Reverend use his own money to put up a statue to his own heroes. Fair enough. But leave that one alone.
 

Battalion

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docsouth.unc.edu

Inscriptions:
Left: ERECTED UNDER THE AUSPICES / OF THE / NORTH CAROLINA DIVISION / OF THE UNITED DAUGHTERS OF / THE CONFEDERACY / AIDED BY THE ALUMNI OF / THE UNIVERSITY

Right: TO THE SONS OF THE UNIVERSITY / WHO ENTERED THE WAR OF 1861 – 65 / IN ANSWER TO THE CALL OF THEIR / COUNTRY AND WHOSE LIVES / TAUGHT THE LESSON OF / THEIR GREAT COMMANDER THAT / DUTY IS THE SUBLIMEST WORD / IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
 
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