Private Josephus S. Morris, Company H. North Carolina 67th Regiment

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Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
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Josephus S. Morris was a 28-year-old Onslow County resident when he enlisted May 23, 1864, in Company H. of the 67th Regiment. In this ambrotype, Private Morris wears a “Richmond Depot” style of jacket with a shorter collar than the “Raleigh Depot” style. Morris's jacket is mostly unbuttoned, revealing a pull shirt with a placket front. H wear his cravat outside his collar. Both jacket and trousers are made of wool. Morris survived the war and lived another fifty-seven year.

Image provided by the Iconographic Collection, North Carolina Office of Archives




 

Biscuit

Private
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Jan 8, 2018
Location
NH
So why would one keep the top and bottom buttons buttoned, but leave a large portion of the center section unbuttoned? I know there was a relatively large "Napoleon-esque" style back then while taking photos, ie. putting your hand in your jacket... Surely this wasn't laziness?
 
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Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
So why would one keep the top and bottom buttons buttoned, but leave a large portion of the center section unbuttoned? I know there was a relatively large "Napoleon-esque" style back then while taking photos, ie. putting your hand in your jacket... Surely this wasn't laziness?
I was not an uncommon pose for the time, but it would definitely be viewed as sloppy and unmilitary today.
 

AUG

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Texas
So why would one keep the top and bottom buttons buttoned, but leave a large portion of the center section unbuttoned? I know there was a relatively large "Napoleon-esque" style back then while taking photos, ie. putting your hand in your jacket... Surely this wasn't laziness?
I think one reasons is due to the cut and stiffness of the jacket, making it a bit uncomfortable to sit down if the wearer buttoned all the buttons and creasing or bulging at the middle. Also, it seems to have been in style at the time to leave some buttons unbuttoned and expose your undershirt - just for that extra touch of attitude.
 

AUG

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There's some more info on Greg Mast's State Troops and Volunteers FB page:

Private Josephus S. Morris, Company H ("Tecumseh's Scouts"), 67th Regiment N.C. Troops

In April 1863, an over-sized heavy artillery company from Craven County, commanded by Captain John N. Whitford, was converted to infantry and split into two companies. The new organization, formally the 1st Battalion N.C. Local Defense Troops, was commonly known as “Whitford’s Battalion N.C. Partisan Rangers.” By the end of 1863 the battalion grew to ten companies and in January 1864 was renamed the “67th Regiment N.C. Troops.” However, the regiment remained under state control, and did not muster into the Confederate Army. Throughout its service, the regiment was employed in the defense of eastern North Carolina, often cooperating with Confederate authorities.

Company H (“Tecumseh’s Scouts”), 67th North Carolina, was recruited from several eastern counties under partial or total Federal control. The captain, Christopher C. Foy, left a memorable impression: “Captain Foy was a man of 60 years, was six feet and a half high, wore a long, flowing white beard that reached to his waist and was unique both in personal appearance and in the influence which he wielded over the men of his company. He was familiarly known in the regiment by the name of ‘Tecumseh.’ When the writer first saw him he was marching at head of his company of 65 or 70 men, who were following him, Indian-like, in single file.”

Service records of enlisted men of the 67th North Carolina are sparse. Private Josephus S. Morris was from Onslow County and enlisted in Company H on May 23, 1864. He was present on June 30, 1864, and after that date there are no further military records for him. Morris (May 13, 1836-August 18, 1922) is buried in the Jacksonville Municipal Cemetery, Onslow County, North Carolina.

Morris is clad in a Richmond Depot pattern uniform coat of blue-gray English Army cloth. The buttons appear to be a U.S. eagle pattern. The lighter colored trousers may also be of imported English blue kersey wool.
https://www.facebook.com/pg/State-Troops-and-Volunteers-321689201335430/photos/?ref=page_internal
 
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