Restricted Debate Prior to the Cicil War were ther segregated or integrated schools for backs in the North?

major bill

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I have read that many of the North backs could read and write at the start of the Civil War. So did they attend segregation schools in most Northern states or were there large numbers of integrated schools in Northern states?

I know that in my home state of Michigan the Raisin Institute was said to be the first integrated school and did not open until Michigan became a state in 1837. So I assume that as a territory Muchigan schools were segregated. I am unsure how other states did this. Did most Nothern states have integrated schools? Is it safe to assume free black children went to segregated schools in most Southern states?
 

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O' Be Joyful

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Most schools were obviously segregated, though against Slavery, the majority could not bring themselves to think of all as equal.

But there was Harveysburg, about 6 miles from where I grew up.

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In Harveysburg's early years Elizabeth Harvey, wife of Dr. Jesse Harvey, recognized the need to educate African American and Native American children in the area. The Harveys built the Harverysburg School in 1831, which was one of the first schools for such minority children in Ohio and the Northwest Territory. It was supported by the Harveys and members of the Grove Monthly Meeting of Friends. Stephen Wall, a wealthy North Carolina plantation owner, provided funding to relocate eight slave children and their families to Harveysburg for their education at this school. Orindatus S.B. Wall, oldest son of Steven became the first regular commissioned African American captain in the U.S. Army during the Civil War. This school closed in 1909 when classes became too small to continue. In 1976 the Harveysburg Bicentennial Committee purchased the building, restored it, and opened it to the public as a symbol of freedom through education.
 

Pat Young

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I have read that many of the North backs could read and write at the start of the Civil War. So did they attend segregation schools in most Northern states or were there large numbers of integrated schools in Northern states?

I know that in my home state of Michigan the Raisin Institute was said to be the first integrated school and did not open until Michigan became a state in 1837. So I assume that as a territory Muchigan schools were segregated. I am unsure how other states did this. Did most Nothern states have integrated schools? Is it safe to assume free black children went to segregated schools in most Southern states?
In Brooklyn there was not de jure school segregation at the time of the Civil War, but there was de facto. In fact, there were three public schools that carried the names Colored School 1, Colored School 2, etc. I do not know if this meant that no blacks were ever in the same schools as whites, but there was racial segregation in the Brooklyn, N.Y. schools.
 
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Pat Young

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Here is a brief description of Colored School 1 in Brooklyn:

Colored School No. 1 in the Fort Greene Section of Brooklyn, New York, founded in 1827, was preceded by the African Free School. Following the establishment of the public school system in Brooklyn in 1850, the African Free School was incorporated into the system and renamed Colored School No. 1. In 1887 following the end of the segregated schools in Brooklyn, the Colored Schools were renamed, and Colored School No. 1 became Public School 67.
 

major bill

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Some escaped slave families live in rural area in Michigan. Each township in rural Michigan had a township school. I have doubts they would have built a special school for a handful of black children. I am not sure blacks in the rural areas were allowed to attend the "white" school. I have never read the were allowed or were not allow to do so. I assume it was legal for blacks to attend the local public school, but not sure it was acceptable in rural areas.
 

demiurge

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Of course, that would negate...everything that was done by THOSE of good will and Honest intentions.

Thanks fer ur contribution. :whistling: And, what looks like...ünd interesting web-site.
Not sure if that was intended sarcastically or not, but JSTOR is a non-profit education site that posts academic articles on over 75 disciplines. It intends no bias that I've ever detected. I've used it often myself.
 


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