History Presidential First Ladies or their Representative's Favorite Recipes

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donna

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When John Tyler, our 10th President succeeded to the presidency on the death of William Henry Harrison, his first wife, Letitia Christian Tyler was still suffering from the effects of a paralytic attack. As she was unable to act as mistress of the White House, Priscilla Cooper Tyler, the wife of their eldest son, acted in that capacity.

During the 17 months that Letitia Tyler was the First Lady, she appeared in public at the White House only once. This was on Jan. 31, 1842, when she attended the marriage of her daughter, Elizabeth to William Nevinson Waller. Less then eight months later, on Sept. 10, 1842, Mrs. Tyler died.

Tyler's daughter-in-law, Priscilla continued to act as hostess until Tyler married Julia Gardiner Tyler on June 26, 1844. Tyler's second wife, Julia was in the White House only a little more than eight months. However, she had been a famous belle and was known as the "Lady Presidentress". She was known for her entertainments, which mimicked those of the Court of Louis Philippe of France, and for the dancing the polka in public in the White House.

The Tyler White House was known for the different foods and beverages served.

A favorite beverage was Tyler's Mint Julep

The main ingredients:

good bourbon
flavorful mint
sugar
silver beakers
one thirsty gentleman

"To each jigger of water, add 1 teaspoon sugar. Dissolve. Crush a good deal of mint in this. Add about 4 to 5 jiggers of bourbon. Make a generous amount. Fill the beakers with crushed ice, pour in mixture, let ice subside. By this time the beakers should be covered with frost---the pride and joy of the julep----so never touch the beaker during the preparation. Add more ice, place a sprig of mint in the side, and serve with pleasure to one happy, thirsty gentleman."

Recipe from: "The James River Plantations Cookbook".

Another favorite recipe was "Tyler's" Pudding. This was Tyler's favorite and carried his name. This pudding is a pie for it is baked on a pastry. We have to remember Tyler had a large family to feed and this dessert was sufficient for all of them.
Tyler Pudding

1 fresh coconut, grated
6 large eggs
5 cups of sugar
1 cup thick cream
1/2 cup butter
pie pastry, uncooked

Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, well-beaten, then add the cream and last the coconut. Pour into four pie pans (9 inch). Place in preheated 300 degrees oven and bake for 15 or 20 minutes until done.

Note: One fourth of the recipe is sufficient for a smaller family.

Recipe from: "The James River Plantations Cookbook".

As to the Civil War, there is much on John Tyler and his family.

John Tyler served as a member of the Confederate States Congress. On August 1, 1861, he was a delegate to the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States. He was elected a member of the House of Representatives of the permanent Confederate Congress on November 7, 1861, but never took his seat. He died on January 18, 1862 at Richmond, Va., before the Congress assembled.

When he died, the government in Washington made no announcement or proclamation of his death and no official notice of his demise was taken.

Five of John Tyler's sons served during the Civil War. They all served in the Confederacy.

They were:

John Tyler, Jr (1819-1896) who was a Colonel in CSA and then served as Confederate Assistant Secretary of war.

Robert Tyler (1816-1877) who served as Confederate Registrar of the Treasury. As registrar, his signature appeared on many Confederate dollar bills.

Tazewell Taylor (1830-1874) became a doctor and served as a surgeon in the Confederate Army. It is written he suffered from what today we call PTSD due to the carnage he witnessed as CW surgeon.

David Gardner Tyler (1846-1927) served as a private in Rockbridge Artillery. He served from 1863 to the surrender at Appomattox in 1865.

John Alexander Tyler (1848-1883). After the death of his father, John Tyler at the age of 14 ran away from home to join the Confederate Army. He was rejected as being too young. However, his mother, Julia Gardiner Tyler, allowed him to join the Confederate Navy. Tyler sent most of his time on a ship quarantined due to yellow fever and left Navy in 1864. He then joined the First Virginia Artillery and was there until surrender at Appomattox in 1865.

Biographical information from "Facts About the Presidents" and Memorials on each son on Find a Grave.
 
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Donna, again what a wonderful thread! I enjoy every post and like Annie, I'm overwhelmed by these lots of interesting stories and historical facts. Thank you very, very much.

I was just going to post a picture, because Pres. Andrew Jackson to me will forever look like Charlton Heston in "The Buccaneer", I have seen that movie so long ago but won't forget about Andrew Jackson.
Expired Image Removed
Picture taken from http://billcainonline.com/?p=5049
Sorry, not a picture of a First Lady you asked for, but a nice one, too, isn't it? Who of us would not have loved to act as his First Lady?
 
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Sarah Childress Polk was the wife of our 11th President, James Knox Polk. She was born on Sept. 4, 1803 in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. She married James Polk on Jan. 1, 1824 in Murfreesboro. Mrs. Polk was well-educated as she went to the Moravian Female Academy in Salem, N.C. The Polks had no children.

As Sarah Polk had no children, her interests were not divided and her entire time was devoted to her husband. She was a capable mistress of the White House and had the crumbling interiors refurbished and redecorated. She was renowned for her glittering parties, receptions, and open houses. A devout Presbyterian, she banned dancing, but did permit entertainments such as juggling in the White House. She was famous for her intelligence and wit and was highly respected even by her husband's political foes. She was her husband's partner in every respect and she was recognized favorably for her contributions to the presidency.

Mrs. Polk died on August 14, 1891 in Nashville, Tennessee. She and President Polk were first buried on Polk Place but in 1893 they were moved to the state capitol grounds in Nashville.

James Polk's favorite foods were unadorned frontier recipes of the South. His favorite was Corn Pone, which Mrs. Polk made for him.

Corn Pone

Sift 2 cups (white) cornmeal with 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and 1 teaspoon salt. Work 4 tablespoons shortening or lard into the dry ingredients. Blend well. Add 3/4 cup boiling water and continue blending. Slowly add 1/2 cup buttermilk until a soft dough is formed. The buttermilk should be added very slowly, making sure the dough retains enough consistency to mold into small flat cakes. Grease a skillet, heat it, then place the cakes in it and bake.

Recipe from: President's Cookbook", pages 185-186.

Note: During the Civil War, Mrs. Polk was officially neutral, but indicated sentiment in favor of preserving the Union during periodic visits to her home by several Union commanders, including Don Carlos Buell, George Henry Thomas, Ulysses S. Grant, and William T. Sherman. After President Polk died in 1849, she always wore black.

Biographical information from: "Facts About the Presidents."
 

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Zachary Taylor, the 12th president of the United States, was married to Margaret Mackall Smith in 1810. She preferred to live a quiet, simple life, avoiding all gaiety and excitement. She refused to appear at public functions. She was about 61 years old when her husband became President, on March 4, 1845. She was in ill health and her youngest daughter, Mary Elizabeth (1824-1909), who was married to William Wallace Bliss, at the time, acted as White House hostess for her mother. The First Lady who had traveled from one military post to another during her husband's years in the army, was looking forward to his retirement from public life. Unfortunately Taylor became ill on July 4, 1850, and died five days later, having served as president for about sixteen months of his term.

Mrs. Taylor went to live with her daughter in Mississippi. She died on August 18, 1852. She and President Taylor are buried in Louisville, Ky.

Zachary Taylor liked Creole cooking. He loved oysters, including oyster gumbo, oyster stew, roasted oysters and fried oysters. One of his favorite foods which was from New Orleans which he brought to the White House, was "Calas-Tous-Chauds". These are delicious cakes, a favorite of New Orleans, which are eaten with morning coffee.

"Dissolve 1 yeast cake in 1/2 cup lukewarm water. When dissolved, stir in 2 cups cooked rice. Let rise overnight. Next morning, beat 2 eggs until light and lemony, add 4 tablespoons salt. Combine mixture and blend in 4 cups flour. Let dough rise 1 hour. Drop by tablespoons into deep fat that has been heated to a medium hot temperature (360 degrees). Fry until browned lightly. Drain and serve piping hot, either with cane syrup or sprinkled with powdered sugar. Makes 50 fritters."

From: "President's Cookbook", pages 192-193.

Zachary Taylor has several connections to persons who served in Civil War. Taylor's son-in-law was Jefferson Davis. Davis was married to Sarah Knox Taylor in 1835. Davis had served under Zachary Taylor during the Mexican War. Taylor didn't want his daughter to marry a military person because of hard times Taylor's wife had moving from post to post when Taylor served in military. Davis resigned from military and married Sarah. They were only married a short time (3 months) when she died on Sept. 15. 1835. Davis would later be President of the Confederacy.

Zachary Taylor's son Richard Taylor was a Confederate General during the Civil War. Richard was born at the "Springfield" family plantation near Louisville, Ky. When the war erupted, he was asked by General Braxton Bragg to assist him. Bragg had known Taylor from before the war. Later Taylor would rise through the ranks. At end of war he was in command of the Army of Tennessee. He surrendered his department at Citronelle, Alabama, the last major Confederate force remaining east of the Mississippi on May 8, 1865. He was paroled three days later.

Biographical information from:

"Facts About the Presidents" and Richard Taylor at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Taylor_(general)
 
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Abigail Powers Fillmore, wife of the 13th President of U.S., Millard Fillmore was born on March 13, 1798 in Stillwater, N.Y. She married Millard on Feb. 5, 1826. They had two children, son, Millard Powers Fillmore and daughter, Mary Abigail Fillmore.

Mrs. Fillmore was an invalid by the time her husband succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor. Her daughter, Mary Abigail Fillmore, assumed the functions of First Lady. Mary Abigail was an accomplished musician, as she played the piano, harp and guitar. While exercising the role of White House hostess she performed at White House functions.

President Fillmore liked simple foods, including plain meat, potatoes and vegetables. When he was president, the first iron cook stove was installed in the White House. Previously, all cooking had been on an open hearth.

Mrs. Fillmore did have many recipes. One of the family's favorites was her Whole Stuffed Tomatoes.

6 firm ripe tomatoes
1 1/2 cups soft bread crumbs
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons butter or dripping
butter in dabs

Select tomatoes of equal size.
Cut a piece from the stem end of each, and remove the centers, being careful not to break the wall.
For the stuffing:
Use the centers of the tomatoes diced, crumbs seasoning and the butter or drippings.
Mix well.
Sprinkle each tomato with salt and pepper.
Fill each tomato with the stuffing.
Place into baking dish.
Place a dab of butter on each.
Bake in a moderate oven (350 degrees) until tender, about 1/2 hour.

Recipe from: "The First Ladies Cookbook-Favorite Recipes of All the Presidents of the United States". 1965.

Mrs. Fillmore died less than a month after her husband ended his term of office. She contracted a chill while attending the inauguration of President Franklin Pierce. She died on March 30, 1853 and is buried in Buffalo, New York.

The Fillmore's daughter, Mary Abigail Fillmore died on July 26, 1854 at the age of 22 years. She died from cholera barely a year after the death of her mother. She has Memorial on Find A Grave.

When President Fillmore took office, there were no books in the White House. Abigail Powers Fillmore, wife of President, who was former schoolteacher and a voracious reader, converted a large room on the second floor of White House into a library. By an Appropriation Act dated March 3, 1851, an amount of $250 was to be used by the President to buy books for the White House. Much thanks is owed to Mrs. Fillmore for this amount and the books.


Note: During the Civil War, Millard Fillmore denounced secession and agreed that the Union must be maintained by force if necessary. However, he was very critical of President Lincoln, and during Reconstruction supported the policies of President Johnson.

Millard Fillmore died on March 8, 1874 in Buffalo, N.Y. He is buried at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo.

Also of interest is that in 1852, during his presidency, Harriet Beecher Stowe published "Uncle Tom's Cabin", the novel that kept slavery a burning issue prior to the War.

Biographical information from: "Facts About the Presidents", "About.com 19th Century History, Millard Fillmore", "Mary Abigail Fillmore" at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Abigail_Fillmore, and "Abigail Fillmore's Whole Stuffed Tomatoes" at http://famefares.wordpress.com/2013/03/31/abigail-fillmore-whole-stuffed-tomatoes-mill...
 
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donna

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Jean Means Appleton was the wife of Franklin Pierce, the 14th President of the United States. She was born on March 12, 1806 in Hampton, N.H. She and Franklin were married on November 10, 1834. They had 3 children who all died young.

When Jane Appleton Pierce became mistress of the White House on March 4, 1853, she entered upon her duties with a troubled heart. Less then two months before the inauguration, her youngest and only surviving child had been killed in a railroad accident. Actually both she and Franklin saw it happen.

All three of their children had died before reaching their teens. Her grief was so great that she lost interest in other matters. Always resentful of the demands that political life made on her husband, he had turned down a series of opportunities at her request, she chose to believe her son's death was connected to her husband's election as President. She wore black while in the White House and did not take the responsibilities of hostess until New Year's Day, 1855.

Up to that time, her place was filled by her uncle's wife, Abby Kent Means. Mrs. Means was assisted by Varina Davis, wife of Jefferson Davis, who was Secretary of State.

Some say Mrs. Pierce was the most tragic and saddest first lady.

Mrs. Pierce died on December 2, 1863 in Andover, Mass. She is buried in Concord, N.H.

The Pierce family liked New England style foods. One of Franklin's favorites was New Hampshire Fried Pies.

Dried apples
sugar
nutmeg
butter
flour
salt
baking powder
eggs

Allow 1 quart dried apples to soak in cold water overnight for 5 to 6 hours. Drain, put into a saucepan, cook, with just enough water to keep from burning, into a thick applesauce. Add 1 cup sugar and 1 teaspoon nutmeg. Set aside. Make a pie crust of 1/2 cup butter or shortening, 2 1/2 to 3 cups flour, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon baking powder. Dough should be firm and have body. Roll it out and cut it into pieces each as wide as a butter plate. Beat 2 eggs into the applesauce and place 4 tablespoons applesauce in the center of each crust portion. Fold the dough over (like a turnover) and press the edges firmly. Bring deep fat to heat in a deep kettle. Drop the pies into the boiling fat (360 degrees) and cook 4 to 5 minutes, turning so the whole pie is well cooked. Best served hot, but can be reheated. Makes 16 pies.

Recipe from: "The President's Cookbook", Poppy Cannon and Patricia Brooks, page 212.

Note: During the Civil War, Franklin Pierce openly opposed Lincoln's order suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus. This stand for Civil Liberties angered many. They said he was bias to the South and a traitor. His reputation was further damaged when letters between him and Jefferson Davis were seized in August, 1863. The correspondence revealed his deep friendship with Davis and ambivalence about the goals of the war. The letters were published by the press.

When Lincoln died, Pierce did not display black or the American flag at his home. His neighbors were angry. He came out to his porch and said he was sad about Lincoln's death but did not think he had to display a flag, as his history of military and public service was all the proof he needed of his pro-Union sympathies. This did quiet the crowd.

Pierce did use his influence to improve treatment of Jefferson Davis when he was in prison. He did express support to Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction Policy and supported acquittal in his impeachment and he expressed optimism for Johnson's successor, US Grant.

Pierce died on October 8, 1869. He is buried in Old North Cemetery, Concord, N. H.

Biography information from: "Facts About the Presidents."
 

donna

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James Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States was a bachelor, one of two, and only one to remain unmarried. The other bachelor was Grover Cleveland, who married during the first of two terms.

Since Buchanan was a bachelor, Harriet Lane, the daughter of his sister Jane Lane, served as mistress of the White House during his administration. Her mother had died when she was seven and her father when she was nine. During her Uncle's presidential term, she married Henry Elliot Johnston of Baltimore, Md., but still served as hostess.

The Buchanan White House liked to entertain and served all kinds of fancy foods and also some southern dishes.

One of Buchanan's favorites was Apees Cookies. Apees also know as A.P. are a spiced butter cookie of German origin and were popular in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Dutch country. Buchanan was born in Cove Gap, Pa. and also liked Dutch foods.

Original Apees Recipe (circa 1828).

"A pound of flour, sifted
Half a pound of butter
A glass of wine, and a tablespoonful of rose water, mixed.
Half a pound of powered white sugar.
A nutmeg grated
A tea-spoonful of beaten cinnamon and mace.
Three table-spoonfuls of caraway seeds."

"Sift the flour into a broad pan, and cut up the butter in it. Add the caraways, sugar and spice, and pour in the liquor by degrees, mixing it well with a knife. If the liquor not sufficient to wet it thoroughly, add enough of cold water to make it a stiff dough. Spread some flour on your paste board, take out the dough, and knead it very well with your hands. Put it into small pieces, and knead each separately, than put them all together, and knead the whole in one lump.

Roll it out in a sheet about a quarter of an inch thick. Cut it out in round cakes, with the edge of a tumbler, or the tin of that size. Butter an iron pan, and lay the cakes in it, not too close together. Bake them a few minutes in a moderate oven, till they are very slightly coloured, but not brow, If too much baked, they will entirely loss their flavor. Do not roll them out too thin."

Recipe from "A Cookie for Every Country: United States: Apees, at http://globalcookies.blogspot.com/2008/01/united-states-apees.html

Another favorite was "Confederate Pudding".

"One quart of milk, a pint of flour, eight eggs, a little salt, and one quart of dried apples cut up very small and well washed. Beat the eggs. Roll fruit in the flour and mix with milk and eggs. Flour a cloth well, pour in the pudding, tie it up and boil five or six hours. Eaten with butter and sugar sauce."

From: "Field and Fireside". August 15, 1863 as found in John Hammond Moore, ed, "The Confederate Housewife" (Columbia, SC: Summerhouse Press, 1997).

Note:" Buchanan held office during the important years immediately preceding the Civil War. Personally, he opposed slavery, viewing it as morally wrong, but he firmly believed that the Constitution protected it, and he considered it his duty to support it publicly. On that basis he supported the admission into the Union of Kansas, a slave state. This caused conflict in the Democratic party.

He supported the Compromise of 1850, which maintained there would be a balance of Senate seats between slave and free state. During the secession crisis, he declared that secession was illegal while trying to soothe the Southern states. His attempts at reconciliation failed. His refusal to take a strong stand against slavery angered the North, and the stance against secession made him unpopular with southerners. When push came to shove, he refused to forcefully stop seven of the fifteen states from seceding from the United States. He delayed the Civil War until Abraham Lincoln became the next president."

"After his term of office, Buchanan retired to his home near Lancaster, Pa. where he supported the Union cause until his death in 1868." He died on June 1, 1868 at the age of 77 years in Lancaster, Pa. and is buried at Woodward Hill Cemetery in Lancaster.

Biographical information from:

"Facts About the Presidents" and "The Fifteenth US President - James Buchanan" at http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/History/presidents/Presidents_15_Buchanan.htm
 

donna

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Mary Todd Lincoln, wife of the 16th President of the United States was born on December 13, 1818 in Lexington, Kentucky. She and Lincoln were married on November 4, 1842 in Springfield, Illinois. They had 4 children, Robert ( 1843-1926),Edward (1846-1850), William (Willie), (1850-1862), and Thomas (Tad), (1853-1871).

Mrs. Lincoln loved entertaining and was the hostess at the White House for Lincoln's entire stay there.

Mary loved to entertain when the Lincolns lived in Springfield. Her main homemaking interest appeared to be cooking. She especially liked making sweets. The cookbooks she purchased after getting married are in the Presidential library at Springfield. Her white almond cake was one of Mr. Lincoln's favorites. She had brought the recipe from her family's favorite bakery in Lexington, Kentucky. She baked this cake for Lincoln when they were courting, in Springfield, and at the White House.

Lincoln's other favorite foods that Mary prepared and had served at the White House were oysters, venison, corned beef, and cabbage. He also loved gingerbread, and fruits, his favorite fruit being apples.

Mrs. Lincoln also liked nice things and did much decorating in the White House. The place needed repairs and new furnishings. She wanted to turn the Executive Mansion into an American Palace. She was an intelligent, energetic woman who always tried to embody the ideals of nineteenth-century femininity, being a steadfast mother and a loyal wife. She also could be outspoken and had an independent nature.

The Lincolns did entertain but at times there were simple and quiet times because of the War. Also there was a mourning time, especially for Mary Lincoln, when their beloved son, Willie died at the White House.

Mrs. Lincoln died on July 16, 1882 in Springfield, Illinois. She is buried with President Lincoln and three of their sons, Edward, Willie and Tad.

Mary Todd Lincoln's White Cake

1 cup blanched almonds, chopped in a food processor until they resemble a coarse flour
1 cup butter
2 cups sugar
3 cups flour
3 teaspoons baking powder
1 cup milk
6 egg whites
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
confectioner's sugar

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a Bundt cake pan.
Cream butter and sugar. Sift flour and baking powder 3 times. Add to creamed butter and sugar, alternating with milk. Stir in almonds and beat well.
Beat egg whites until stiff and fold into the batter. Stir in vanilla extract.
Pour into prepared pan and bake for 1 hour, or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Turn out on a wire rack and cool. When cool, sift confectionary sugar over the top.

A basic white frosting sprinkled with almonds was also popular to frost on the cake.

This recipe from: "Lincoln's Table" by Donna D. McCreary and adapted by Janice Cooke Newman.

Information from:

"Facts About the Presidents" and Lincoln Home National Historic site at http://home.nps.gov/museum/exhibits/liho/printVersion.html

It is obvious as to Lincoln's connection with the Civil War as he was president all during war from, March 4, 1861 thru April 15, 1865.
 
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When Andrew Johnson, the 17th President of the United States took office on April 15th of 1865, after the death of Abraham Lincoln, his wife was an invalid. He and Eliza McCardle had been married since May 17, 1827 in Greeneville, Tn. She was 16 and he was 18 years old.

They had five children, Maratha Johnson Patterson (1828-1901), Charles Johnson (1830-1863), Mary Johnson Stover Brown (1832-1883), Robert Johnson (1834-1869), and Andrew Johnson (1852-1879).

Eliza was a very good cook and always prepared many foods for her family. She taught both her daughters to be good cooks and hostesses.

Since Eliza McCardle Johnson was an invalid when Andrew Johnson became president, their daughter, Martha Johnson Patterson, wife of Senator David Trotter Patterson, acted as White House hostess. She was helped by her sister, Mary Johnson Stover, the wife of Daniel Stover.

Martha was a very capable hostess. She instituted the establishment of a dairy at the White House to keep it supplied with fresh milk and quality butter which the Johnson family loved.

The Johnson's preferred Tennessee country cooking. They loved rice and sweet potatoes. They were also partial to wild turkey and duck. Pine Bark Stew was a Johnson standby.

The Johnson White House, included several children. They were known for their Popcorn Parties and roasted apples and chestnuts.

On President Johnson's 60th birthday, there was a great children's party held at the White House. Engraved invitations were sent to all the children in the city. President Johnson stood at the entrance to the Blue Room and greeted all of them. Even Eliza came downstairs for this event. The White House was beautifully lighted and decorated to look like a fairy land. One little guest exclaimed there were "gorgeous refreshments of ice cream and cakes and glace fruits."

One of Eliza Johnson's recipes was her Sweet Potato Hash with Apples or sometimes called Sweet Potato Pone. Her daughter, Martha also made this while at the White House.

This is recreated recipe on the dish:

"Bake 3 to 4 large yams for about 40 minutes. They will not be done. Peel and cube. Peel, core and slice 2 large apples.

Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a frying pan and sauté apples until they are lightly browned. Sprinkle with a little cinnamon and nutmeg. Transfer them to a small bowl. Turn up heat to medium high, add one stick butter and hash brown the sweet potatoes. They have to be watched because there is a lot of sugar in yams and they will burn if not watched, but they are suppose to be dark brown for maximum flavor. Add back the apples and combine. Serve with pork roast or chops or a roast chicken."

Note: The term yam and sweet potato are used in this recipe.. This is because the yam (while technically different, the sweet potato was then also called a yam in the region of Tennessee that Johnsons from). Different methods of cooking the yam offered a range of uses.

Recipe from: http://pleasebeseated.wordpress.com/2011/08/26/remembering-president-andrew-johnson-...

Other information from Johnson family from: "Facts About the Presidents".

President Johnson assumed office on April 15, 1865. He served 3 years and 323 days from April 15, 1865 to March 4, 1869. This was time from end of Civil war into Reconstruction Period.

Note:



During the war, the Johnson son, Charles Johnson died in 1863 after being thrown from a horse. He was serving at the time with the Middle Tennessee Union Infantry as an assistant surgeon.

The Johnson's son-in-law, Daniel Stover, wife of Mary Johnson Stover, died during the Civil war. He was a Colonel of the Fourth Tennessee Union Infantry. He died in 1864.

Another son, Robert Johnson suffered from alcoholism. He had been in First Tennessee Union Cavalry but had to resign because of his drinking. He then became Johnson's private secretary. He died of this affection in 1869 at the age of 35 years.

The youngest child, Andrew, Jr. was a teenager during the White House year He died at age 27 years old.

The Johnsons had their tragedies too as so many of this time period.
 

donna

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Since this is a long thread, have decided to do another called Part II of the President's hostesses at the White House. Will start part 2 with Ulysses Simpson Grant and his wife Julia Boggs Dent Grant.

I believe this good idea as have many presidents to go.
 

donna

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Since there was mention of Thomas Jefferson and Macaroni, thought I would bump this thread. So many interesting First Ladies and Hostesses served. I will also bump Part II of the thread.

Many of you may have never seen these threads.
 
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Since there was mention of Thomas Jefferson and Macaroni, thought I would bump this thread. So many interesting First Ladies and Hostesses served. I will also bump Part II of the thread.

Many of you may have never seen these threads.

That's because you have around a million very interesting threads, Donna. I could start to read today and by Friday only be halfway.
 

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I just looked at this thread for the first time and I am amazed by the amount of time and research our forum host put into this.what @FarawayFriend says I think would be a good idea as all you would have to do is expand some,it would make for an interesting book thanks for a job well done Donna.
 

donna

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In honor of all the ladies who were hostesses for our presidents, thought bring this thread and the other one on them back up. I know many probably have not seen these. It also gives the President's favorite foods.
 
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Thought would bump this thread, since Harriet Lane, niece of James Buchanan was mentioned in another thread. She did serve as the hostess during his administration. They were very close.
 
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