History Presidential First Ladies or their Representative's Favorite Recipes

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donna

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Since the Presidential Cookie Bake-Off Thread has been so popular, thought I would post one on the favorite recipes of First Ladies, starting with Martha Washington. Some presidents were not married or widowers and had others serve as their hostess, so will try to post their recipes too.

Martha Dandridge Custis Washington was born on June 21, 1731 in New Kent County, Va. She was daughter of Frances Jones Dandridge and Colonel John Dandridge. She was first married to Daniel Parke Custis in June , 1749. They had four children. He died in July, 1757.

Martha married George Washington, our first president, on January 6, 1759 at the Custis Estate. Mrs. Washington was a very accomplished woman. Even though she had servants she developed her own recipes and instructed them in how to prepare the dishes. She directed hospitality at Mount Vernon and later at the White House, which never was in Washington as not completed at that time. Over the years her recipe list grew.

Martha compiled a cooking scrapbook for more than 50 years. In 1799 she passed it to her granddaughter, Eleanor Parker Custis, as a wedding gift. It stayed in the family until 1892 when it was presented to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, where it remains. Mrs. Washington died on May 22, 1802, 2 years and 159 days after her husband, George Washington.

George Washington loved Martha's dishes. One of his favorites was her Whisky Cake.

Martha Washington's Whisky Cake (recreated)

Makes 1 round or 2 standard loaves. Follow the directions for either the recipe of your favorite spice cake or box mix and add the following.

1 cup of raisins
1 cup slivered almonds
1 cup dried cherries
1 cup of candied orange peel, chopped small
2 teaspoons powdered cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon powdered ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon powdered cloves

Pre heat the oven to 325 degrees. Spray a round tube pan with non-stick spray or line 2 9" x 5" x 2" loaf pans with Baker's Parchment. Mix all ingredients together and pour into the prepared baking pans. Bake for 1 hour or until a slim bamboo skewer inserted into the center of each pan comes out clean. Remove from the oven and place on wire racks to cool. When cool, remove from the pans and wrap in clean natural fiber cloths. An old tea towel or piece of muslin is good. Pour about a quarter of a cup of bourbon over each cake and store in an air tight container. Continue the aging process by pouring a bit more bourbon over the cloths every three or four days for about two weeks before using. These cakes may be kept for months.

Note: Martha Washington was renowned for her Whisky Cake and it was a favorite of Georges. Martha's cake would not have been leavened with baking powder or baking soda. Neither came into use until the middle of the 19th century. Her cake would have been leavened with yeast, egg whites or hearts horn, (baker's ammonia).

From: http://www.thequestingfeast.com/recipes/a-h/Cake_Whisky_Martha_Washington.html

Biographical information from: "Facts About the Presidents" Joseph Nathan Kane, Janet Podell and Steven Anzovin.

Remember a Civil War connection : Mrs. Robert E. Lee ( Mary Ann Custis) was descended from Martha. Her father, George Washington Parke Custis, known as Wash, was George Washington's stepgrandson. George Washington gave Wash a piece of land on the Potomac River where Wash Custis built a mansion called Arlington. It eventually passed to Mary Ann and her husband, army officer Robert E. Lee. During the Civil War, while Lee was commanding the armies of the Confederacy, the property was confiscated by the Union Army; the mansion was used as a headquarters and the surrounding parkland as a burial ground. The estate is now Arlington National Cemetery.
 

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Abigail Smith Adams, wife of our 2nd President, John Adams was born on Nov. 11, 1744 in Weymouth, Mass. She was daughter of Elizabeth Quincy Smith and William Smith. She married John Adams on Oct. 25, 1764 in Weymouth, Mass. They had 5 children. She died on October 28, 1818 in Quincy, Mass. Her husband lived more than 7 years from her death.

Mrs. Adams was the first of the first ladies to live in the White House in Washington, D.C. She moved in November, 1800. She and President Adams held a New Years reception in 1801, the first reception at the White House.

Mrs. Adams also like Martha Washington had many recipes. She also like Martha Washington maintained the same strict etiquette. She did prefer the climate of New England and many of her dishes reflect the New England style of cooking.

One of Abigail Adams best recipes was her Apple Pan Dowdy. This was one of John Adams favorites.

Pastry

1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 cup shortening

Filling

1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
10 apples
1/2 cup molasses
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1/4 cup water

Pastry
Blend the flour and shortening together until mealy. Sprinkle a little ice water over dough, enough to hold together. Roll out to 1/4 inch thickness and brush with 1/4 cup melted butter. Cut pastry in half. Place halves on top of each other. Roll and cut again. Repeat until you have 16 separate pieces piled up. Then chill 1 hour. Roll pastry again and cut in half. Line bottom of baking dish with one half. Save the other half for the top.

Filling
Peel and slice the apples. Mix sugar and spices and put in the pastry lined dish. Combine molasses a with butter and water. Pour over apples. Cover with top crust and seal. Bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes. Then reduce heat to 325 degrees. "Dowdy" the dish by cutting the crust into the apples with a sharp knife. Bake 1 hour. Serve hot.

You can top with ice cream or whipped cream.

Recipe from: "Capitol Hill Cooks".

Biography from: "Facts About the Presidents", as mentioned in pervious post.

Note: John Adams and his son, John Quincy Adams were the first father and son to be Presidents of the United States.
 
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Another wonderful thread, donna!
Here comes anothe Martha Washington recipe, dear George must have had an enourmous appetite for sweets!

Martha Washington Candy

2 cups sugar
1 cup water
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix the sugar, cream of tartar an water. Cook until it boils. Do not stir. After it breaks in cold water, cool. D butter when it is cold enough to beat. Beat until it crytallizes, knead and form into balls. Chopped nuts or raisins may be added. May be dipped in malted chocolate, to which a small amount of paraffin wax has been added.

From: The Original Country Cookbook, 1976.

I have bought that booklet during my first visit in the USA in 1978, somewhere in the Shenandoah Valley. Last year when we went to Mount Vernon I remembered that recipe. But I have to admit that I would never try that paraffin wax thing ...
 
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Martha Jefferson Randolph was the daughter of our third president, Thomas Jefferson. Since her father was a widower she acted as his hostess at the White House along with her other sister. The cookbook, "The Virginia Housewife" was the one Martha used besides her father's recipes. She also had some of her own recipes.

Martha Jefferson Randolph's Chicken Pudding, a favorite Virginia Dish

"Beat ten eggs very light, add to them a quart of rich milk, with a quarter of a pound of butter melted, and some pepper and salt, stir in as much flour as will make a thin good batter; take four young chickens, and after cleaning them nicely, cut off the legs, wings, &c.. Put them all in a sauce pan, with some salt and water, and a bundle of thyme and parsley, boil them till nearly done, then take the chicken from the water and put it in a dish, bake it; send the nice white gravy in a boat."

From: "Our White House Looking In, Looking Out".
http://www.ourwhitehouse.org/tasteofpast.html

Note: Civil War connection: Thomas Jefferson Randolph was the oldest grandson of Thomas Jefferson. His mother was Martha Jefferson Randolph, daughter and hostess for Thomas Jefferson. During the Civil War, Thomas Jefferson Randolph was a Colonel in the Confederate Army.
 

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Another wonderful thread, donna!
Here comes anothe Martha Washington recipe, dear George must have had an enourmous appetite for sweets!

Martha Washington Candy

2 cups sugar
1 cup water
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix the sugar, cream of tartar an water. Cook until it boils. Do not stir. After it breaks in cold water, cool. D butter when it is cold enough to beat. Beat until it crytallizes, knead and form into balls. Chopped nuts or raisins may be added. May be dipped in malted chocolate, to which a small amount of paraffin wax has been added.

From: The Original Country Cookbook, 1976.

I have bought that booklet during my first visit in the USA in 1978, somewhere in the Shenandoah Valley. Last year when we went to Mount Vernon I remembered that recipe. But I have to admit that I would never try that paraffin wax thing ...
We use a product called "Gulf Wax" for dipped candies that call for paraffin. You could probably substitute dipping chocolate (we get it at craft stores and Wally World), but there's nothing like a good chocolate on candies. I make chocolate covered cherries and use paraffin. Might find some modern recipes and see what the proportions are before you try it.
 
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We use a product called "Gulf Wax" for dipped candies that call for paraffin. You could probably substitute dipping chocolate (we get it at craft stores and Wally World), but there's nothing like a good chocolate on candies. I make chocolate covered cherries and use paraffin. Might find some modern recipes and see what the proportions are before you try it.
Ah, I see, we have something similar here, a chocolate for dipping, some kind like your Baker's chocolate (I think that was the name). It probably does not contain wax, but dries also with a light shine, which is probably why the wax is added?

Martha Jefferson Randolph was the daughter of our third president, Thomas Jefferson. Since her father was a widower she acted as his hostess at the White House along with her other sister. The cookbook, "The Virginia Housewife" was the one Martha used besides her father's recipes. She also had some of her own recipes.
The house Pres. Jefferson gave his daughter as dowry when she married Mr. Randolph is now a Bed& Breakfast, situated near Charlottesville. Just lovely:
 
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Ah, I see, we have something similar here, a chocolate for dipping, some kind like your Baker's chocolate (I think that was the name). It probably does not contain wax, but dries also with a light shine, which is probably why the wax is added?




View attachment 39346
Yes! Sounds perfect.
 

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...
Note: Civil War connection: Thomas Jefferson Randolph was the oldest grandson of Thomas Jefferson. His mother was Martha Jefferson Randolph, daughter and hostess for Thomas Jefferson. During the Civil War, Thomas Jefferson Randolph was a Colonel in the Confederate Army.
And his brother, George Wythe Randolph, was organizer of the Richmond Howitzers (and Confederate Secretary of War).

Sorry, couldn't pass up an opportunity to mention the Howitzers.
 

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Dolley (proper spelling) Madison was the wife of our 4th President, James Madison. She was born in May, 1768 in area know as Guilford County, N.C. She was the daughter of Mary Coles Payne and John Payne. She was first married to John Todd who died in 1793. They had two children. John Payne Todd was only child that lived (1792-1852).

Dolley married James Madison on Sept. 15, 1794. Dolley was know for her hospitality and entertaining. You might say she was "the hostess with the mostest". She is one of my favorite first ladies. Mrs. Madison had a warm, vivacious personality and was an extraordinary popular member of Washington society. She arrived at the White House with a fund of experience as she on many occasions served as hostess for the widowed Thomas Jefferson when his daughters couldn't. Dolley is also remembered for saving some White House treasures when the British entered Washington in August 1814. She was a brave and heroic lady.

Dolley was known for many recipes. One favorite was strawberry ice cream. Another was her Ginger Pound Cake with Cardamom Syrup.

Cake:

3 cups cake flour
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup, 2 sticks, unsalted butter softened
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
3 large eggs
1 1/2 tablespoon peeled and grated ginger root
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 cup milk

Syrup:

1/4 cup water
1/4 cup granulated sugar
3 cardamom pods or 1/2 teaspoon of ground cardamom
1/2 inch thick slice ginger root
6 black peppercorns

Fresh Fruit or Confectioner's Sugar for dusting

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour the inside of a Bundt or Tube pan, or spray with nonstick cooking spray. Sift together flour, ground ginger, baking powder, baking soda and salt. With an electric beater beat the butter for two minutes at medium until creamy and add sugar and continue to beat for two more minutes, or until mixture is light in texture and color.

Beat in the eggs one at a time, beating 30 to 40 seconds after each egg is added. Scrape down the side of bowl frequently with a rubber spatula to keep the batter even. Beat in the grated ginger root and lemon juice. On low speed, alternately add the sifted mixture in three additions with the milk in two additions beginning and ending with the sifted mixture. Pour and scrape the batter into the prepared pan, smooth the top with a rubber spatula. Bake the cake for 50 to 55 minutes until raised and a wooden toothpick inserted into the cake withdraws cleanly.

To make the syrup: Combine the water, sugar, cardamom, ginger and peppercorns in a small non-reactive saucepan. Set over medium heat, and warm the mixture stirring frequently until the sugar melts, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the pan from the stove and let mixture stand for 10 minutes allowing the flavors to infuse into the syrup. Strain this syrup through a medium sieve and into a small bowl. Use a pastry brush and dab the syrup over the surface of the warm cake allowing it to sink in before reapplying in the same area. Let the cake cool completely. Garnish with fresh fruit, mint sprigs and confectioner's sugar. This can also be served with one of Dolley's favorites, strawberry ice cream.

After the presidential years, James and Dolley retired to their home. Montpelier in 1817. Here the couple managed a large plantation, entertained hundreds of visitors and jointly edited Madison's significant political papers, including his notes on the Constitutional Congress. James Madison died on June 28, 1836. She lived at Montpelier until 1844 when she settled in Washington D.C. Dolley died on July 12, 1849. She and her husband are buried at Montpelier, near Charlottesville, Va.

Note: During the Civil War (winter of 1863 and 1864) Montpelier was the location of a substantial set of winter encampments occupied by Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Lee's camps spread across George County and the western most sections of these camps, under the command of General Cademus Wilcox, was at Montpelier.

Recipe from: www.presidentialcullnaymuseum.org

Biography from: "Facts About the Presidents".

Information on Encampment at Montpelier: http://www.montpelier.org/research-and-collections/archaeology-at-montpelie...
Another informative site is on James and Dolley Madison at http://www.montpelier.org/james-and-dolley-Madison

Montpelier is well worth a visit. Many always visit Jefferson's home but fail to visit this beautiful home and site.
 
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Elizabeth Kortright Monroe was the wife of James Monroe, the 5th President of U.S. She was born June 30, 1768 in New York, N.Y. She was daughter of Hannah Aspinwall Kortright and Captain Lawrence Kortright. She married James Monroe on Feb. 16, 1786. They had three children. Their son, J. S. Monroe only lived for a little over a year.

Mrs. Monroe who had accompanied her husband to his posts in England and France was familiar with political life. She had entertained a lot in the early days. After he was elected president, she was ill some of the time. Their two daughters, Eliza Monroe and Maria Hester Monroe helped being hostess at the White House.

They were know for formal dinners since they were influenced by times in England and France. Their daughter, Maria was married at the White House. There were several small receptions for her.

Mrs. Monroe had many recipes. They are published in book, Monroe Family Recipes. It can be purchased at Ash Lawn Highland (their former home) at the Museum Shop.

Two of their favorite recipes are Cream Jumbles and Minted Fruit Cordial.

Cream Jumbles

"One pound of sugar, one of butter, two eggs, one cup of cream made into a stiff paste, rolled thin and baked quickly."

Recreated version:

2 cups sugar
1 cup cream
1 pound butter
4 cups flour
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla

Cream the butter and sugar together completely. Beat in eggs. Add cream and flour alternately; add vanilla. Chill dough for at least an hour. Roll thin, cut into shapes and bake at 350 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes. Makes 5 dozen. These can be baked in shapes or as drop cookies.

Minted Fruit Cordial

"One half pint of grape juice, one half pint of orange juice, one half cup of chopped mint. one pint of water, juice of six lemons or limes. Mix fruit juice and mint and stand on ice one hour. A dash of sugar to taste. Add water and pour into glasses half filled with ice. A sprig of mint in each glass and serve at once."

From: http://ashlawnhighland.org/family-recipes/

The Monroe home, originally called Highland, is now Ash Lawn Highland. It is near the homes of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. They were all friends and visited each other all the time.
 

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Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams was the wife of John Quincy Adams, the 6th President of the United States. She was the first First Lady born outside of the boundaries of the United States. She was born in London, England, where her father, Joshua Johnson, was posted as the U.S. Consul. She was born on Feb. 12, 1775.

She married John Quincy Adams on July 26, 1797 in London, England. They had four children.

Mrs. Adams was know for her hospitality at the White House. She was warm and sincere. The Adams always served the choicest foods and the rarest wines. Mrs. Adams was known for her Shrewsbury Biscuits. Shrewsbury biscuits/cakes are an English dessert named after Shrewsbury a county town of Shropshire. The recipe was taken to the White House when First Lady, Louisa Catherine Adams made them for her husband.

Shrewsbury Biscuits

1/2 cup butter, room temperature
5 ounces sugar
2 egg yolks
zest of 1 lemon or 1 orange
8 ounces all-purpose flour
2 ounces currants

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.

In a large mixer bowl, cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Stir in the egg yolks and the lemon zest. Slowly add the flour and the currants. Stir until the dough comes together.

Roll half of the dough on a lightly floured surface until 1/4 inch thick. Cut the dough into rounds and place on the prepared sheets. repeat with the other half of the dough. Roll the dough scraps and cut as many cookies as possible. Do not reroll dough too many times.

Bake the cookie (biscuits) for about 15 minutes until lightly browned on the edges. Cool for 5 minutes on the baking sheet and then remove to wire rack to cool completely.

Louisa Adams died on May 14, 1852. She and President Adams are buried in Quincy, Mass.

Note: During the Civil War, their son Charles Francis Adams, Sr. served as U.S. Minister to Great Britain. He was Lincoln's minister and after Lincoln's death President Johnson's (ambassador) to the Court of St. James from 1861-1868. Adams was instrumental in maintaining British neutrality and preventing British diplomatic recognition of the Confederacy.

Adams and his son, who was his secretary, were kept busy monitoring Confederate diplomatic intrigues and the construction of rebel commercial raiders by British shipyards. Example: The "Enrica" of Liverpool that was transformed near the Azores Islands into sloop-of-war, CSS Alabama.

Recipe from: http://4goodnessbake.blogspot.com/2012/11/shrewsbury-biscuits.html

Biographical Facts from: "Facts About the Presidents".
 
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If any of you are related to any of our First Ladies or the Presidents please comment. I think all of us would love hearing this information. Also if you know of other Civil War connections on each, please add. These facts make it more pertinent to the Civil War era.
 

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When Andrew Jackson became the 7th President of the United States, his wife, Rachel Donelson Robards Jackson had recently passed away. It was a very hard time for Andrew Jackson as he loved Rachel so very much.

However, Jackson knew he would need a hostess for the White House. He asked Emily Tennessee Donelson, who was the daughter of John Donelson, the brother of Rachel to be his hostess and come to Washington to live in the White House. Emily had experience as she already helped Rachel at the Hermitage, the Jackson's plantation in Tennessee. Emily gladly accepted and also brought with her to help her niece, Mary Ann Eastin. Emily was married to A.J. Donalson, who was ward of Andrew and Rachel Jackson.

In 1834, Sarah Yorke Jackson and Andrew Jackson, Jr., Andrew Jackson's adopted son and their two young children, came to Washington to live with Andrew Jackson. Sarah immediately began to take on the role of co-hostess of the White House. To make for good relations between the women, Jackson always referred to Emily as hostess of White House and to Sarah as the "mistress of the Hermitage". The arrangement seemed to work fairly well.

Sarah finally took over all duties at the White House after Emily Donelson fell ill with tuberculosis and died in 1836. Sarah remained hostess until Jackson'e term expired in 1837. Sarah and Andrew Jr. returned to the Hermitage with President Jackson. They lived with him until his death. Andrew Jr. inherited the plantation and they lived there, except for period during Civil War until their deaths. Actually, Sarah was allowed to live there by the state of Tennessee until her death in 1887.


President Jackson liked many foods and entertained a lot with both Emily and Sarah as hostesses. One of his favorites which was originally made by Rachel and which the women learned to help make was the "Floating Island Dessert", also known as "Eggs In Snow or Ceufs A La Neige".

Period Recipe:

Break ten eggs
Separate the yolk for the egg white
Whip the egg whites until they form stiff peaks. Then add two spoons of powdered sugar and a little bit of orange blossom water.
Pour half a litre of milk and 250g of sugar into a saucepan.
Once your milk has started to bubble, take a tablespoon of your egg white mix and drop it into the milk. This will poach your egg whites.
When all your little mountains of egg white have been poached, remove them.
Remove half of the milk mixture from the saucepan, and add your egg yolks to the casserole, mixing it slowly with a wooden spoon.
Once the milk and the egg yolks are properly mixed, that's your crème anglaise custard.
Remove the saucepan from the heat.
To finish off, place your little egg mountains on a plate and dribble some crème anglaise over them.

Recipe from: http://www.napoleon.org/en/magazine/pleasure_napoleonic/a_table/files/478259.asp

Biographic information from: "Facts About the Presidents", Emily Donelson at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Donelson and Sarah Yorke Jackson at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Yorke_Jackson

During the Civil War Andrew Jackson Jr. and Sarah Yorke Jackson had two sons that served. These would be Andrew Jackson's grandsons from adopted son.

Col. Andrew Jackson III (1834-1906) was Confederate officer. He was born at the Heritage. He graduated from West Point in 1858. He was Colonel of the 1st Tennessee Heavy Artillery.

Captain Samuel Jackson (1837-1863), another son, was a Confederate officer. He was also born at the Hermitage. He died of wounds received at the Battle of Chickamauga. He is buried at the Hermitage.

During the Civil War the Hermitage was a pilgrimage destination for soldiers in both the Union and Confederate armies. Men flocked to the General's rural retreat to pay homage to a military hero they greatly admired and respected.

On July 21, 1862, a small cavalry brigade visited the Hermitage. This group of soldiers were under the command of newly promoted Brigadier General Nathan Bedford Forrest. They stopped at the Hermitage to visit and honor the deceased Jackson. Upon arrival at the Hermitage. they encountered a group of local women who were here to remember the first anniversary of the Battle of Manassas. The two groups met for the afternoon and had a picnic.

Information on Hermitage and Civil War from: http://press.tnvacation.com/news-archives/872/civil-war-at-the-hermitage-a-living-history-j...
 

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When Martin Van Buren became the 8th President of U.S., he had been a widower for about 18 years. His wife, Hannah Hoes Van Buren had died in 1819. The first lady or hostess for his White House was his daughter-in-law, Angelica Singleton Van Buren (1818-1877). Martin had four sons and Angelica was married to Abraham Van Buren. She was the youngest woman to ever hold title of the First Lady. She was born in South Carolina and brought many of her family's southern dishes to the White House. She also made sure Martin, her father-in-law, was served his favorite foods, Boar's Head, oysters, doughnuts, figs, raisins, and apples.

Angelica was hostess for all of Van Buren's term. Martin Van Buren's table was always exquisitely prepared. The food, wine and service was impeccable. His fondness for Boar's Head and other English dishes came from when he was Minister to England during Andrew Jackson's administration. His love of oysters and apples came from his Dutch heritage.

One of Martin's favorites and always prepared at White House was Dutch Apple Cake.

"Mix together 1/4 cup butter, 1/2 cup sugar, and 1 egg. Add 1/2 cup milk, 1 1/2 cups sifted flour, and 2 teaspoons baking powder. Peel and slice several tart apples. Spread the dough into a round greased baking dish. Place the apples in rows on top. Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. Bake in moderate oven (350 degrees) for about 35 minutes."

Recipe from: "The President's Cookbook", page 158.

Biographical information from: "Facts About the Presidents", and Angelica Singleton Van Buren at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelica_Singleton_Van_Buren
 
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The 9th President of U.S. was William Henry Harrison. Poor fellow he was in office only from March 4, 1841 to April 4, 1841 when he died of pleurisy fever (pneumonia).

His wife, Anna Symmes Harrison did not come to Washington with him as she had taken ill one month before the inauguration. President Harrison died before she could come after feeling better.

Harrison's daughter-in-law, Mrs. Jane Irwin Harrison the wife of William Henry Harrison, Jr. accompanied the President to Washington and acted as temporary mistress/hostess of the White House. There was practically no social activity at the White House in the short time President Harrison was there.

Two of Harrison's favorite things to eat or drink were Squirrel Stew and hard cider. During his campaign, there was much cider served and consumed and he became known as the "Hard Cider Candidate.

Squirrel Stew can be a form of "Burgoo", a combination of squirrel and vegetables. It can also be a basic stew with dumplings.

Squirrel Stew

2 squirrels
6 tablespoons butter
6 tablespoons flour
salt and pepper to taste
1 cup sifted flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon shortening
6 tablespoons milk

Boil squirrel in water with salt and pepper until meat separates easily from the bone. Remove meat from water and peel off all bones. Discard bones. Add butter and flour mixture to boiling water slowly. Return meat to water. Stir flour, baking powder and salt together. Add shortening and pinch it in with fingers until it is well mixed. Gradually stir in milk with fork, just add enough to make a soft dough. Drop dumplings by teaspoons to float above meat and cook well. Cook until dumplings are done about 15 to 20 minutes.

Recipe from cooks.com

Biography from: "Facts About the Presidents".

Note: Benjamin Harrison, grandson of William Henry Harrison fought for Union during the Civil War. Later he would become the 23rd president of the U.S.
 

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Donna, can't believe I've missed this- far too much information packed into one, single thread to digest properly this quickly- gosh, thank you! It's very much like several threads inside one, is the thing. These treasures in our History make me a little overwhelmed- there's just so MUCH- how lucky are we?

" During the Civil War Andrew Jackson Jr. and Sarah Yorke Jackson had two sons that served. These would be Andrew Jackson's grandsons from adopted son.

Col. Andrew Jackson III (1834-1906) was Confederate officer. He was born at the Heritage. He graduated from West Point in 1858. He was Colonel of the 1st Tennessee Heavy Artillery.

Captain Samuel Jackson (1837-1863), another son, was a Confederate officer. He was also born at the Hermitage. He died of wounds received at the Battle of Chickamauga. He is buried at the Hermitage.

During the Civil War the Hermitage was a pilgrimage destination for soldiers in both the Union and Confederate armies. Men flocked to the General's rural retreat to pay homage to a military hero they greatly admired and respected.

On July 21, 1862, a small cavalry brigade visited the Hermitage. This group of soldiers were under the command of newly promoted Brigadier General Nathan Bedford Forrest. They stopped at the Hermitage to visit and honor the deceased Jackson. Upon arrival at the Hermitage. they encountered a group of local women who were here to remember the first anniversary of the Battle of Manassas. The two groups met for the afternoon and had a picnic."

History in a loop, a little, folding back on itself before moving forward- gives you chills a little when the ends meet sometimes. That's information, may have lain dormant had not some astute History geek like us kept track of the ghosts of time rattling around that old house, decided it was best for everyone to name them.

It's tough for folks to step forward, raise their hands on being related to these people you know? You can look like an idjit, or one of those folks like you see on Ancestry, who buttonhole everyone they can get their hands on with the news that their gazillionth grandfather was Richard III. We have one in the tree and have always known it- these days what you get is folks running to the internet saying ' Yes, but was your James xyz REALLY born in 1799, and prove it, if you can't then that link means nothing.' * sigh * Just something always been there. that's all- no intention of proving a thing ( a pic of my relation would do well- scribble a beard on her, poor thing, there he is ), does make it difficult to raise one's head above the breastworks, however.
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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Sorry to clutter up your thread, Donna. Angelica Singleton Van Buren was just such a lovely young woman, you can see how she would have made quite a hit in Washington. Hard to imagine she was so young for her duties.

asv.jpg
From Wiki, a Henry Inman portrait- knocks your socks off, doesn't it? He was SUCH a fabulous artist- I've never been able to replicate fabric, to where you just know exactly what it is the sitter is wearing. Angelica's feathers, satin facing- all of it ( am uncertain what the handkerchief and dress fabric would have been )- so clear you can touch it. Bet she didn't cook in this!
 

donna

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Angelica was a very pretty woman. Annie, Thanks for posting portrait. It is a wonderful work.

If you can post portraits or pictures of any of the other First Ladies, would be much appreciated. Adds so much to who they are.
 
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