President Andrew Johnson


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civilwarincolor

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Nice job, just a few suggestions.

At the time Johnson took office he was 57, so he probably would not have had that dark of hair. From other images of him I have seen I would suggest a fair amount of gray, with a small bit of brown.

The ribbon for the pocket watch (I think that's what that is) is the same color as the vest. I would suggest that you give it a different color, that way it will stand out more.

Last suggestion, the green background jumps out a bit, you might try reducing the opacity for that layer so it is a bit softer. It will allow the background to appear more natural and not overpower his portrait.

Keep up the good work,

David
 

Joshua Horn

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At the time Johnson took office he was 57, so he probably would not have had that dark of hair. From other images of him I have seen I would suggest a fair amount of gray, with a small bit of brown,
Thanks for the suggestions. I was going off this portrait. I thought it was the official presidential portrait painted during his term, but I just found it wasn't painting until 1880. I read some sources say that his hair was black, but it doesn't look really that black to me. That would explain why.

The LOC says this image was taken in 1860. I have seen several sources from the end of his presidency saying that his hair had turned grey. Based off all the other presidents who went completely grey while in office, I would guess that in 1860 he didn't have as much as the contemporary portrait below.

johnson-andrew-presidential-portrait.jpg


I think this painting was produced during his term:

Expired Image Removed
 

civilwarincolor

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Thanks for sharing that portrait. Does not look like a happy guy, does he?

If this was painted in 1880, it was 5 years after his death, so it may have been a bit generous with his hair color.

Overall I still think your color tones are a bit vibrant and it would probably come off more realistic if they were softened a bit. Just my 2 cents,
 

Joshua Horn

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Thanks for sharing that portrait. Does not look like a happy guy, does he?

If this was painted in 1880, it was 5 years after his death, so it may have been a bit generous with his hair color.

Overall I still think your color tones are a bit vibrant and it would probably come off more realistic if they were softened a bit. Just my 2 cents,
I just replaced the image. Darker hair & suite, colored watchband and a few other minor changes.
 

5fish

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Andrew Johnson had two sons that served in the Union army. One died during the war and one a few years after the war...

Rober Johnson: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6661633/robert-johnson

Civil War Union Brevet Brigadier General. In the Civil War, he served as a Colonel in the 1st Tennessee Cavalry and for service to the Union was brevetted Brigadier General of US Volunteers in March, 1865. After the war, he served as private secretary to his father President Andrew Johnson until he retired in 1869. Unable to overcome a lifelong battle of alcoholism, he committed suicide.

Charles Johnson: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6661609/charles-johnson

Son of President Andrew Johnson and Eliza McCardle Johnson; doctor and pharmacist; assistant surgeon in the Middle Tennessee Union Infantry, Civil War; he was killed when he was thrown from his horse in Nashville at age 33 in 1863, while his father was military governor of Tennessee.

Andrew Johnson two Daughters

Martha: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6661593/martha-patterson

Daughter of President Andrew Johnson and Eliza McCardle Johnson; wife of United States Senator David Trotter Patterson; she served as White House hostess during her father's term, 1865-1869

Mary: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6661620/mary-brown

Mary Johnson Stover Brown; she was the daughter of President Andrew Johnson and Eliza McCardle Johnson.

Another Son: Andrew: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6661641/andrew-johnson

Andrew "Frank" Johnson, youngest son of President Andrew Johnson and Eliza McCardle Johnson; a journalist; he died at age 26.


This mystery Lady: Rosa: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/123063188/rosa-l.-johnson
 

5fish

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I like to point out that Andy Johnson was a general too...

According to the Smithsonian National Museum of American History Andrew Johnson was indeed a general. He is dubbed a “Brigadier General, U.S. Army (Volunteers), 1862-1865.” Since he served during the turbulent times of the Civil War, Johnson’s military service is unusual and difficult to define.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Johnson was representing his home state of Tennessee as a U.S. senator. Johnson was pro-slavery, but disagreed with secession. When Tennessee seceded Johnson stayed loyal to the Union, becoming the only southern senator to keep his seat in Congress. Johnson’s property was confiscated and his family left Tennessee, and in the North, his courageous act garnered popular support.

In 1862, Abraham Lincoln appointed Johnson as military governor of Tennessee, with the rank of brigadier general. Johnson held this position throughout the Civil War until he was elected Vice President in 1864. As a pro-Union Southerner, Johnson was a nice fit for the 1864 ticket. After Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, Johnson succeeded to the presidency as our nation recovered from the war . Most historians view Johnson’s presidency as one of the worst. Charged with an enormous responsibility, Johnson failed significantly as our country’s leader.
 

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