Muzzleldrs Possible Civil War Gun Question

Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
It was windy and chilly today, so i went to town eat, get dog food and look a small local gunshop.......ended up buying a Ruger Wrangler .22 so I wont have to use my Browning Buckmark hunting fishing.......the kind of logic that enables buying another gun:bounce:
Was hoping to stumble on a 6.5 swede, but no luck.

But they had a old muzzleloading carbine in a gun rack, but had a strap so didnt take it down. The tag said it was 1829/38 Belgian .80 cal used by the 1st Iowa. When got home looked it up not finding anything that really matches that tag, but apparently during the ACW Belgium did have/use a .75 carbine. Is this something that should warrant further investigation? If it is legit, would it have much value?
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
Texas
I can't identify it based on the description. Did you happen to take any photos of it? A number of different types of Belgian made muskets and rifles were imported during the war, but I am not familiar with any of them baring the designation you listed. The bore size is probably an error too, since most should be in the .69-.71 caliber range. For a musket to have that large of a bore I would expect it to pre-date the Civil War considerably, most probably pre-1800.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
I didn't have camera, would guess barrell was 18-22 in range, but it appeared a purposed carbine stock that rounded off least 4 inches before end of barrel, like alot of cw era carbines.

The dixie pic looks alot like it from what it pictures, it was pretty simple mechanically, wood rather plain as pictured as well, the carbine the stain was probably weaker, more faded. Carbine was priced considerably cheaper then the dixie rifle.....but besides being a carbine, if the dixie rifle is VG, guessing the carbine be only fair. Wood seemed bit more faded, and metal not as clean.
 
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Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
Meant to get pics last week, but fate/life intervened, was up that way today and got a couple pics, not sure if carbine is belgian or french.
image0.jpeg
image2.jpeg
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
Thinking it might be 1829 french artillery carbine, would foreign artillery carbines have been issued to Cav?
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
One of the revolvers in case in first pic was a Colt root, hadn't seen one in the firsthand before.

In the case underneath the carbine in the first pic was a Colt dragoon, 2 Colt Navies, a civilian colt smaller then navy, slightly larger then the root, then the Colt Root......none of which were for sale.
 
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mofederal

Major
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Location
Southeast Missouri
French Model 1822 T carbine, converted to percussion.

The Model 1822 was used in both the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War. During the latter, .69 caliber muskets (mostly percussion, but some flintlocks as well) were common in the early part of the war (either in their original form or converted to rifling). I am sorry the lock plate is different. The lock plate on the carbine archieclement photographed has a lock plate more like an 1822 musket.

French-smooth-bore-cavalry-carbine.jpg
 
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Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
French Model 1822 T carbine, converted to percussion.

The Model 1822 was used in both the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War. During the latter, .69 caliber muskets (mostly percussion, but some flintlocks as well) were common in the early part of the war (either in their original form or converted to rifling). I am sorry the lock plate is different. The lockplate on the carbine archieclement put on has a lock more like an 1822 musket.

View attachment 396729
Think the lock matches this, except st entienne manufacture.

https://www.gunsinternational.com/g...9-61-artillery-musketoon.cfm?gun_id=100885724
 

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