Poll: Vote for President in the 1868 Election-Grant or Seymour?

Who is your choice for president in the 1868 election?

  • Horatio Seymour (Democrat)

    Votes: 12 30.0%
  • U.S. Grant (Republican)

    Votes: 28 70.0%

  • Total voters
    40
  • Poll closed .

Pat Young

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#1
seypost.JPG

grantpost.JPG

November 3 is the 150th Anniversary of the election of Ulysses S. Grant to the presidency. Who do you cast your vote for in this hard-fought contest? After you cast your vote, please leave a comment (if you want to) on why you voted for your choice.

Feel free to electioneer near this polling site.
 

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#3
1868 Presidential slogans...

1868[edit]
  • "Let Us Have Peace" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant
  • "Vote as You Shot" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant
  • "Peace, Union, and constitutional government."Horatio Seymour

The slogan for the 1868 Democratic National Convention was, "This is a White Man's Country, Let White Men Rule".

Title to Grant's Campaign Song “The Man Who Saved the Nation”
 

archieclement

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#6
Me either, In Missouri just being related to someone who fought for the South could disqualify you

However would imagine that very Republican policy would tend to make one Democrat once one could vote......
 
Last edited:

luinrina

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#10
I probably wouldn't have been allowed to vote either - not because I'm a woman but because I'm not American. I voted nonetheless. :D


Please excuse me if this is getting off-topic or even into modern politics but I have a question:

In order to understand the 1868 election better and to cast an informed vote, I read up some more on what each party stood for (making some discoveries I need to further investigate) and that's when I stumbled over the following sentence on this site:
Despite the tradition that presidential nominees did not actively campaign, Seymour took a tour of the Midwest and the mid-Atlantic states in mid-October.
Now, thinking back on all the news I saw about the presidential elections in the last two decades, it suggests to me that this tradition was either at some point given up or never really followed in the first place. Or have I been misunderstanding the news feeds and it wasn't the presidential candidates that were campaigning but their parties? But in those TV duels it was always the presidential candidates opposing each other and answering questions, not some members of the parties. :confused:

Can anyone shed some light on that please?
 

Zella

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#11
I probably wouldn't have been allowed to vote either - not because I'm a woman but because I'm not American. I voted nonetheless. :D


Please excuse me if this is getting off-topic or even into modern politics but I have a question:

In order to understand the 1868 election better and to cast an informed vote, I read up some more on what each party stood for (making some discoveries I need to further investigate) and that's when I stumbled over the following sentence on this site:

Now, thinking back on all the news I saw about the presidential elections in the last two decades, it suggests to me that this tradition was either at some point given up or never really followed in the first place. Or have I been misunderstanding the news feeds and it wasn't the presidential candidates that were campaigning but their parties? But in those TV duels it was always the presidential candidates opposing each other and answering questions, not some members of the parties. :confused:

Can anyone shed some light on that please?
You're not misunderstanding it! Attitudes have just changed dramatically. At one point in time, it was considered very unseemly to campaign for oneself. Now it would look really weird to not stump for yourself. I'm not 100% sure when that changed.
 
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#15
You're not misunderstanding it! Attitudes have just changed dramatically. At one point in time, it was considered very unseemly to campaign for oneself. Now it would look really weird to not stump for yourself. I'm not 100% sure when that changed.
you could be nice and serve the gentlemen discussing politics some tea, though - and next time don't forget the cookies again
smilie_girl_002.gif
 
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#20
I couldn't have voted for president in 1868 either, although in my home territory of Wyoming, I could have voted for territorial and local offices (but not Federal) starting in 1869. We in the Equality State (although not yet a state) were the first!

I wouldn't have been serving tea and cookies but would have been out there agitating for Votes for Women! And probably riding astride!
 



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