Politics of New Jersey before and during the Civil War

Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
27
#1
As a lifelong resident of the Garden State, the unique politics of New Jersey before and during the Civil War have always been of particular interest to me. Thus, the purpose of this thread is to delve into reasons why New Jersey rejected Lincoln twice and behaved in many ways like a Border State with regard to emancipation and Reconstruction.

Obviously, there was precedent for New Jersey's political position during the years leading up to and during the war. It was the last Northern non-Border state to abolish slavery, doing so in 1804 and through a system of gradual - extremely gradual - emancipation. In fact, the long apprenticeships required by the New Jersey emancipation law resulted in "a handful of slaves among its population" counted as late as the 1860 Census (Hawk, Franklin and Marshall College, 2017). In addition, New Jersey's emerging position as an economic powerhouse - specifically with regard to textile production - undoubtedly created a crucial trade relationship with the cotton states (I believe a similar economic relationship contributed to the large anti-Lincoln, anti-war contingency in New York City).

Still, there are some assertions about the factors that shaped New Jersey politics that I want to explore and evaluate further. The previously-cited Hawk article states, "The political culture of New Jersey more closely resembled a slaveholding Border State like Kentucky or Delaware than its neighboring free states of New York and Pennsylvania." I cannot agree fully with this. Kentucky, in my view, was perhaps the least loyal of the Border States and shared almost nothing in common culturally or economically with New Jersey. The comparison with Delaware, however, is much more appropriate geographically, culturally, and socioeconomically. I also cannot agree totally with the contrast between New Jersey and New York. Yes, New Jersey rejected Lincoln twice while New York voted Republican - albeit by narrow margins - in both 1860 and 1864. However, New Jersey Governor Joel Parker was a staunchly pro-war Democrat while New York Governor Horatio Seymour was ambivalent towards the war at best. New York City Mayor Fernando Wood was so passionately pro-Confederate that he wanted to declare it a free city. As for Pennsylvania, it was certainly a more pro-Lincoln state than either New Jersey or New York. The Keystone State's influence in this regard is evident, as the South Jersey counties near Philadelphia voted for Lincoln twice while their North Jersey counterparts soundly rejected the Republican tickets of 1860 and 1864.

Any insights on New Jersey politics of the time, including comparisons with other Union states and/or factors that may have contributed to the Garden State's lukewarm attitude towards the Lincoln Adminstration, are much appreciated!
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
May 27, 2011
Messages
15,836
Location
los angeles ca
#2
As a lifelong resident of the Garden State, the unique politics of New Jersey before and during the Civil War have always been of particular interest to me. Thus, the purpose of this thread is to delve into reasons why New Jersey rejected Lincoln twice and behaved in many ways like a Border State with regard to emancipation and Reconstruction.

Obviously, there was precedent for New Jersey's political position during the years leading up to and during the war. It was the last Northern non-Border state to abolish slavery, doing so in 1804 and through a system of gradual - extremely gradual - emancipation. In fact, the long apprenticeships required by the New Jersey emancipation law resulted in "a handful of slaves among its population" counted as late as the 1860 Census (Hawk, Franklin and Marshall College, 2017). In addition, New Jersey's emerging position as an economic powerhouse - specifically with regard to textile production - undoubtedly created a crucial trade relationship with the cotton states (I believe a similar economic relationship contributed to the large anti-Lincoln, anti-war contingency in New York City).

Still, there are some assertions about the factors that shaped New Jersey politics that I want to explore and evaluate further. The previously-cited Hawk article states, "The political culture of New Jersey more closely resembled a slaveholding Border State like Kentucky or Delaware than its neighboring free states of New York and Pennsylvania." I cannot agree fully with this. Kentucky, in my view, was perhaps the least loyal of the Border States and shared almost nothing in common culturally or economically with New Jersey. The comparison with Delaware, however, is much more appropriate geographically, culturally, and socioeconomically. I also cannot agree totally with the contrast between New Jersey and New York. Yes, New Jersey rejected Lincoln twice while New York voted Republican - albeit by narrow margins - in both 1860 and 1864. However, New Jersey Governor Joel Parker was a staunchly pro-war Democrat while New York Governor Horatio Seymour was ambivalent towards the war at best. New York City Mayor Fernando Wood was so passionately pro-Confederate that he wanted to declare it a free city. As for Pennsylvania, it was certainly a more pro-Lincoln state than either New Jersey or New York. The Keystone State's influence in this regard is evident, as the South Jersey counties near Philadelphia voted for Lincoln twice while their North Jersey counterparts soundly rejected the Republican tickets of 1860 and 1864.

Any insights on New Jersey politics of the time, including comparisons with other Union states and/or factors that may have contributed to the Garden State's lukewarm attitude towards the Lincoln Adminstration, are much appreciated!
I have never come across any information that on a per capita basis New Jersey had more or less young men enlist in the Union Army then any other state. I have never come across any information that New Jersey's troops had a higher desertion rate then any other state.
I have never come across any figures for men from New Jersey joining the Confederate Army not to say any did not. One book cited by @CSA Today estimated 2k men from Pennsylvania joined the Confederate Army and a source cited by @CM Winkler estimated 4k men from Indiana joined the Confederate Army.
McCellen was a native son if New Jersey and perhaps to much us made if the 1864 Presidential election. McCellen made it quite clear that if he won he would not grant Independence to the Confederacy.
By November 1864 the Confederacy was basically defeated. There was no viable path to Independence.
Leftyhunter
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
27
#3
I have never come across any information that on a per capita basis New Jersey had more or less young men enlist in the Union Army then any other state. I have never come across any information that New Jersey's troops had a higher desertion rate then any other state.
I have never come across any figures for men from New Jersey joining the Confederate Army not to say any did not. One book cited by @CSA Today estimated 2k men from Pennsylvania joined the Confederate Army and a source cited by @CM Winkler estimated 4k men from Indiana joined the Confederate Army.
McCellen was a native son if New Jersey and perhaps to much us made if the 1864 Presidential election. McCellen made it quite clear that if he won he would not grant Independence to the Confederacy.
By November 1864 the Confederacy was basically defeated. There was no viable path to Independence.
Leftyhunter
Agreed, I have never come across such information either. There’s no question that New Jersey troops proved to be some of the most valiant and loyal in the Federal Army. That’s why I’m searching for factors that may have contributed to New Jersey’s appetite for, politically speaking, a more conservative form of Unionism. There’s no question that the state was pro-Union. What it wasn’t, however, was pro-Lincoln. McClellan being a favorite son was a factor for sure, but there’s definitely more to the story.
 
Joined
May 27, 2011
Messages
15,836
Location
los angeles ca
#4
Agreed, I have never come across such information either. There’s no question that New Jersey troops proved to be some of the most valiant and loyal in the Federal Army. That’s why I’m searching for factors that may have contributed to New Jersey’s appetite for, politically speaking, a more conservative form of Unionism. There’s no question that the state was pro-Union. What it wasn’t, however, was pro-Lincoln. McClellan being a favorite son was a factor for sure, but there’s definitely more to the story.
Just speculating that perhaps voters from New Jersey were more in favor of free trade and more favorable to the Democratic Party then other states.
Leftyhunter
 

trice

Lt. Colonel
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
11,197
#5
As a lifelong resident of the Garden State, the unique politics of New Jersey before and during the Civil War have always been of particular interest to me. Thus, the purpose of this thread is to delve into reasons why New Jersey rejected Lincoln twice and behaved in many ways like a Border State with regard to emancipation and Reconstruction.

Obviously, there was precedent for New Jersey's political position during the years leading up to and during the war. It was the last Northern non-Border state to abolish slavery, doing so in 1804 and through a system of gradual - extremely gradual - emancipation. In fact, the long apprenticeships required by the New Jersey emancipation law resulted in "a handful of slaves among its population" counted as late as the 1860 Census (Hawk, Franklin and Marshall College, 2017). In addition, New Jersey's emerging position as an economic powerhouse - specifically with regard to textile production - undoubtedly created a crucial trade relationship with the cotton states (I believe a similar economic relationship contributed to the large anti-Lincoln, anti-war contingency in New York City).

Still, there are some assertions about the factors that shaped New Jersey politics that I want to explore and evaluate further. The previously-cited Hawk article states, "The political culture of New Jersey more closely resembled a slaveholding Border State like Kentucky or Delaware than its neighboring free states of New York and Pennsylvania." I cannot agree fully with this. Kentucky, in my view, was perhaps the least loyal of the Border States and shared almost nothing in common culturally or economically with New Jersey. The comparison with Delaware, however, is much more appropriate geographically, culturally, and socioeconomically. I also cannot agree totally with the contrast between New Jersey and New York. Yes, New Jersey rejected Lincoln twice while New York voted Republican - albeit by narrow margins - in both 1860 and 1864. However, New Jersey Governor Joel Parker was a staunchly pro-war Democrat while New York Governor Horatio Seymour was ambivalent towards the war at best. New York City Mayor Fernando Wood was so passionately pro-Confederate that he wanted to declare it a free city. As for Pennsylvania, it was certainly a more pro-Lincoln state than either New Jersey or New York. The Keystone State's influence in this regard is evident, as the South Jersey counties near Philadelphia voted for Lincoln twice while their North Jersey counterparts soundly rejected the Republican tickets of 1860 and 1864.

Any insights on New Jersey politics of the time, including comparisons with other Union states and/or factors that may have contributed to the Garden State's lukewarm attitude towards the Lincoln Adminstration, are much appreciated!
In the Election of 1860, New Jersey split the Electoral College vote 4-3. There was a "Fusion" vote in some areas where the supporters of the other three candidates joined together in an "anybody-but-Lincoln" vote. Lincoln lost where the "Fusion" movement was and won where the vote was split up.

There is a book called The Secession Movement in the Middle Atlantic States ( 1973) by Fred Niklason, who I think was a professor at Fairleigh Dickinson. This is a really, really dry book that uses statistics and old newspaper accounts to look at the five states (NY-NJ-PA-MD-DE) on the eve of the Civil War. It comes to the conclusion that NJ was the most-likely-to-secede, IIRR. The Paramus library had a copy many years ago.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
27
#6
In the Election of 1860, New Jersey split the Electoral College vote 4-3. There was a "Fusion" vote in some areas where the supporters of the other three candidates joined together in an "anybody-but-Lincoln" vote. Lincoln lost where the "Fusion" movement was and won where the vote was split up.

There is a book called The Secession Movement in the Middle Atlantic States ( 1973) by Fred Niklason, who I think was a professor at Fairleigh Dickinson. This is a really, really dry book that uses statistics and old newspaper accounts to look at the five states (NY-NJ-PA-MD-DE) on the eve of the Civil War. It comes to the conclusion that NJ was the most-likely-to-secede, IIRR. The Paramus library had a copy many years ago.
Thanks for the suggestion - I’ll definitely try to track down a copy of that book.

And yes, I am familiar with the 1860 Fusion Ticket in NJ. While Lincoln was awarded four of New Jersey’s seven Electoral votes, the Fusion (in the candidate of Stephen Douglas) won the state’s popular vote. I have to believe that NJ’s large immigrant community, most of whom fit squarely in the “Northern Democrat” category, as well as its burgeoning manufacturing sector (creating the economic relationship with the cotton states), were central to the rejection of Lincoln in 1860. I am sure that similar voting patterns can be found in ethnic wards of neighboring New York City and Philadelphia, despite the latter’s reputation as a more solidly Republican city at the time.
 

trice

Lt. Colonel
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
11,197
#7
Just speculating that perhaps voters from New Jersey were more in favor of free trade and more favorable to the Democratic Party then other states.
Leftyhunter
New Jersey was usually aligned with "the South" in Congress. NJ was the last state to emancipate their slaves before the Civil War. Southern planters were far more likely to send their sons to Princeton than Harvard or Yale.
 

trice

Lt. Colonel
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
11,197
#8
Thanks for the suggestion - I’ll definitely try to track down a copy of that book.

And yes, I am familiar with the 1860 Fusion Ticket in NJ. While Lincoln was awarded four of New Jersey’s seven Electoral votes, the Fusion (in the candidate of Stephen Douglas) won the state’s popular vote. I have to believe that NJ’s large immigrant community, most of whom fit squarely in the “Northern Democrat” category, as well as its burgeoning manufacturing sector (creating the economic relationship with the cotton states), were central to the rejection of Lincoln in 1860. I am sure that similar voting patterns can be found in ethnic wards of neighboring New York City and Philadelphia, despite the latter’s reputation as a more solidly Republican city at the time.
NJ and PA were the two states where Republicans pushed the iron-and-steel tariff in the 1860 Election. The area of NJ that applied to would be places from Bayonne over to Paterson and down towards Allaire. Up in Bergen County there was little support for Republicans, Lincoln, or the Civil War (although there are 3 brothers who served in the same USCT regiment buried in Park Ridge).
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
27
#9
New Jersey was usually aligned with "the South" in Congress. NJ was the last state to emancipate their slaves before the Civil War. Southern planters were far more likely to send their sons to Princeton than Harvard or Yale.
Was this unique to New Jersey among Northern states, or was it just more conspicuous in New Jersey because of its small size? New York City, for example, seemed to have been a Democratic bastion with no love lost for Lincoln or, in some cases, the war effort in general (i.e., the 1863 Draft Riots and Fernando Wood's attempts to obtain "free city" status). However, the politics of New York State as a whole were not as strongly Democratic due to heavily Republican areas Upstate and in Western New York. New Jersey, on the other hand, seemed to have been divided into a mostly Republican southern half (counties adjacent to Philadelphia) and a mostly Democratic northern half (counties adjacent to NYC and the Upper Delaware Valley). Thus, a slightly more populous North Jersey gave the Democrats a statewide advantage. Still, I have never heard of New Jersey being grouped with the South in Congress. Yes, NJ was the last Northern state to emancipate, but that was still 57 years before Fort Sumter. In addition, New Jersey was strongly pro-Union throughout the war, and Governor Joel Parker was a steadfastly pro-war Democrat. I don't see any widespread evidence of Confederate sympathies in New Jersey during the Civil War, only a distaste for the Lincoln Administration's policies and ambivalence towards emancipation as a war goal in certain areas of the state.
 

Story

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Messages
1,421
Location
SE PA
#10
Abstract
A popular narrative of the Civil War assumes that all Northern states stood united behind President Abraham Lincoln in their loyalty to the Union. However, the case of New Jersey suggests that this narrative of devotion is simply a myth. The agrarian economy of New Jersey kept the state firmly opposed to universal emancipation, and New Jersey behaved more like a border state than its geographic neighbors of Pennsylvania and New York. By examining New Jersey's response to the release of the Emancipation Proclamation and the Election of 1864, the myth of Northern unity is broken by understanding persistent state-level economic factors.

An Anomalous Case of Southern Sympathy: New Jersey 's Civil War Stance Emily A. Hawk Franklin & Marshall College Class of 2016
https://cupola.gettysburg.edu/cgi/v...com/&httpsredir=1&article=1082&context=gcjcwe
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
27
#11
Abstract
A popular narrative of the Civil War assumes that all Northern states stood united behind President Abraham Lincoln in their loyalty to the Union. However, the case of New Jersey suggests that this narrative of devotion is simply a myth. The agrarian economy of New Jersey kept the state firmly opposed to universal emancipation, and New Jersey behaved more like a border state than its geographic neighbors of Pennsylvania and New York. By examining New Jersey's response to the release of the Emancipation Proclamation and the Election of 1864, the myth of Northern unity is broken by understanding persistent state-level economic factors.

An Anomalous Case of Southern Sympathy: New Jersey 's Civil War Stance Emily A. Hawk Franklin & Marshall College Class of 2016
https://cupola.gettysburg.edu/cgi/v...com/&httpsredir=1&article=1082&context=gcjcwe
I've read the Hawk article. It makes some very strong arguments, but the "agrarian economy" argument is, in my opinion, inconsistent. The reality is that New Jersey was a free state not dependent on slave labor, albeit one that had instituted an extremely gradual emancipation system 57 years before the start of the war. By the eve of Lincoln's election, New Jersey had become an industrial powerhouse, with cities like Newark, Paterson, Trenton, and Camden having developed into bastions of manufacturing. These cities offered plentiful job opportunities to new immigrants. So, we have two reasons why, in Hawk's words, "state-level economic factors" contributed to New Jersey's rejection of Lincoln's policies. For one, New Jersey industrialists were protective of the economic relationship with the cotton states, meaning that a faction of powerful people in the state would be unenthusiastic about the prospect of war with the South. Another factor is the state's large population of first-generation Americans at the time. Ethnic Irish and others who had recently arrived to U.S. shores were undoubtedly wary of the competition an influx of freedmen from the South would create in the low-wage job market (i.e., in the factories of New Jersey cities).
 
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
11,197
#14
Was this unique to New Jersey among Northern states, or was it just more conspicuous in New Jersey because of its small size? New York City, for example, seemed to have been a Democratic bastion with no love lost for Lincoln or, in some cases, the war effort in general (i.e., the 1863 Draft Riots and Fernando Wood's attempts to obtain "free city" status). However, the politics of New York State as a whole were not as strongly Democratic due to heavily Republican areas Upstate and in Western New York. New Jersey, on the other hand, seemed to have been divided into a mostly Republican southern half (counties adjacent to Philadelphia) and a mostly Democratic northern half (counties adjacent to NYC and the Upper Delaware Valley). Thus, a slightly more populous North Jersey gave the Democrats a statewide advantage. Still, I have never heard of New Jersey being grouped with the South in Congress. Yes, NJ was the last Northern state to emancipate, but that was still 57 years before Fort Sumter. In addition, New Jersey was strongly pro-Union throughout the war, and Governor Joel Parker was a steadfastly pro-war Democrat. I don't see any widespread evidence of Confederate sympathies in New Jersey during the Civil War, only a distaste for the Lincoln Administration's policies and ambivalence towards emancipation as a war goal in certain areas of the state.
Certainly more pronounced in NJ.

The state was also apparently unique in one other thing: emigration. According to an article I read (once, long ago, no idea where), when people from Northern states (those North of the Mason-Dixon Line and the Ohio River) moved within the country, they moved to a new Free State/Territory. When people from Southern States (those South of the Mason-Dixon Line and the Ohio River) moved within the country, they moved to a new Slave State/Territory. The exception was New Jersey, where more people moved to a Slave State/Territory.

On NJ Republican areas, the ones you are pointing to are also the industrial areas of NJ. The ones you are calling Democratic were overwhelmingly rural (anything near the Shore was essentially hard-to-reach and lightly populated before the RR got there; not sure what places out near Hackettstown were like in 1860.)

On Slavery: gradual emancipation in NJ was R-E-A-L-L-Y S-L-O-W. NJ denies there are any left in 1860; the Federal census of 1860 shows a few (all but one are over age 65) which NJ describes as "indentured for life". There was also a cute little deal running in NJ where slaveholders freed their underage slaves -- making them wards of the state -- and then took them back as guardians for the wards. The state paid them for taking care of them until adulthood. At one point, this pay amounted to roughly 25% of the state's annual budget. It was also administered by local commissioners who decided who to place the newly-freed slaves with -- and they might be slaveholders themselves.

Bergen County was an area that was not very enthusiastic about the Civil War. In 1861, IIRR, the legislature had to threaten drafting up this way to get the men needed for the first call for troops in 1861 and the 9-month regiment raised up here for the 1864 Campaign is generally regarded as the worst of the NJ regiments (Colonel is buried in the same cemetery with those three USCT brothers). That NJ regiment was down in VA that Spring-Summer, but was never brought up for combat by Grant or Meade.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
27
#15
Certainly more pronounced in NJ.

The state was also apparently unique in one other thing: emigration. According to an article I read (once, long ago, no idea where), when people from Northern states (those North of the Mason-Dixon Line and the Ohio River) moved within the country, they moved to a new Free State/Territory. When people from Southern States (those South of the Mason-Dixon Line and the Ohio River) moved within the country, they moved to a new Slave State/Territory. The exception was New Jersey, where more people moved to a Slave State/Territory.

On NJ Republican areas, the ones you are pointing to are also the industrial areas of NJ. The ones you are calling Democratic were overwhelmingly rural (anything near the Shore was essentially hard-to-reach and lightly populated before the RR got there; not sure what places out near Hackettstown were like in 1860.)

On Slavery: gradual emancipation in NJ was R-E-A-L-L-Y S-L-O-W. NJ denies there are any left in 1860; the Federal census of 1860 shows a few (all but one are over age 65) which NJ describes as "indentured for life". There was also a cute little deal running in NJ where slaveholders freed their underage slaves -- making them wards of the state -- and then took them back as guardians for the wards. The state paid them for taking care of them until adulthood. At one point, this pay amounted to roughly 25% of the state's annual budget. It was also administered by local commissioners who decided who to place the newly-freed slaves with -- and they might be slaveholders themselves.

Bergen County was an area that was not very enthusiastic about the Civil War. In 1861, IIRR, the legislature had to threaten drafting up this way to get the men needed for the first call for troops in 1861 and the 9-month regiment raised up here for the 1864 Campaign is generally regarded as the worst of the NJ regiments (Colonel is buried in the same cemetery with those three USCT brothers). That NJ regiment was down in VA that Spring-Summer, but was never brought up for combat by Grant or Meade.
Interesting, as so many New Jersey regiments are notable for their valor and distinguished service (i.e., the 12th New Jersey at Gettysburg, the 33rd New Jersey at Chattanooga, etc). However, as Bergen County was one of the areas of greatest resistance to emancipation in NJ decades earlier, it is not entirely surprising that lack of enthusiasm for the war in the state would have been concentrated in that area.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
27
#16
On NJ Republican areas, the ones you are pointing to are also the industrial areas of NJ. The ones you are calling Democratic were overwhelmingly rural (anything near the Shore was essentially hard-to-reach and lightly populated before the RR got there; not sure what places out near Hackettstown were like in 1860.).
I think this is a bit of a generalization. Statistics show that the Republican/Democratic split in New Jersey was more of a North Jersey/South Jersey thing. South and southwest of Monmouth, all counties except Gloucester voted for Lincoln in 1860 (including some of the most rural areas of the state). Monmouth and all counties to the north and northwest, save Morris and Passaic, voted for the Fusion. In 1864, the North/South split was even more pronounced, with all counties south of Mercer and Monmouth voting for Lincoln, and those two counties plus all counties to the north voting for McClellan. This would support your assertion that the state’s “anti-war” concentration may very well have been centered around Bergen County. It is also consistent with the reality that slavery in New Jersey, when it did exist as a legal institution, was heavily concentrated in North Jersey. Heavy Quaker influence in South Jersey largely precluded slavery gaining a foothold as an institution in the region in colonial times.
 
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
11,197
#17
I think this is a bit of a generalization. Statistics show that the Republican/Democratic split in New Jersey was more of a North Jersey/South Jersey thing. South and southwest of Monmouth, all counties except Gloucester voted for Lincoln in 1860 (including some of the most rural areas of the state). Monmouth and all counties to the north and northwest, save Morris and Passaic, voted for the Fusion. In 1864, the North/South split was even more pronounced, with all counties south of Mercer and Monmouth voting for Lincoln, and those two counties plus all counties to the north voting for McClellan. This would support your assertion that the state’s “anti-war” concentration may very well have been centered around Bergen County. It is also consistent with the reality that slavery in New Jersey, when it did exist as a legal institution, was heavily concentrated in North Jersey. Heavy Quaker influence in South Jersey largely precluded slavery gaining a foothold as an institution in the region in colonial times.
I am not sure when he moved there, but McClellan lived in Maywood after the Civil War (on the RR coming up through Hackensack). Bergen County was pretty sparsely settled farm country at that point. The Hackensack and New York RR had reached Hackensack by 1858, but wasn't up to Hillsdale until 1870.

Paterson in Passaic is only a few miles away from Hackensack and was one of the great pre-Civil War industrial cities of the US. Boonton Iron Works had been around since the 1770s and got bigger when the Morris Canal was built around 1830. Ringwood Iron Works had forged the Great Chain for West Point in the Revolution. Down in Allaire, the engine for Robert Fulton's Claremont was built at James Allaire's works. NJ iron production was generally bog iron, suffering from British competition/dumping after the Crimean War, and thus strong supporters were abundant in those areas for the Morrill Tariff in the election of 1860. I've never looked, but you might find strong support along the Delaware River as well, since that would tie the population to PA/Philadelphia interests. (NJ iron works were important contributors to the Union war effort -- Allaire supplied the engines for at least 17 Union warships, being owned by Cornelius Vanderbilt -- but many died out after the Civil War.)

Many of the manufacturers of cheap goods for the slaves of "the South" were in Brooklyn and the area around Bayonne, NJ (companies that it appeared the Confederacy was going to default debt payments to in early 1861).

If you haven't already seen it, you might want to take a peak at the New Jersey and the Civil War page on NewJerseyAlmanac.com where you'll find this paragraph:

The state's emerging industrial sector also provided needed support for the War. Charles Hewitt’s Trenton Iron Works made 1,000 musket barrels a week at the height of the war; textile factories in Paterson and Newark produced hundreds of thousands of uniforms; and former cutlery manufacturers in Trenton converted their production to supply thousands of swords and bayonets. Paterson’s Rogers, Ketchum and Grosvenor Locomotive Works built many of the railroad engines and locomotives that transported troops and supplies; its locomotive The General was the subject of the famous chase in 1862 when it was seized in northern Georgia by Union spies and Army volunteers in civilian clothes and driven to Tennessee to damage the railroad along its path while pursued by Confederates, with seven of the raiders, including its leader James Andrews, later caught and hung as spies.​
 
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
11,197
#18
Interesting, as so many New Jersey regiments are notable for their valor and distinguished service (i.e., the 12th New Jersey at Gettysburg, the 33rd New Jersey at Chattanooga, etc). However, as Bergen County was one of the areas of greatest resistance to emancipation in NJ decades earlier, it is not entirely surprising that lack of enthusiasm for the war in the state would have been concentrated in that area.
For anyone interested in such matters, there is a truly excellent book called Remember You Are Jerseymen: A Military History of Jerseys Troops in the Civil War by Joseph G. Bilby and William C. Goble covering all the units raised in New Jersey for the Civil War. There is a chapter of each regiment of infantry or cavalry and (I think) for each artillery battery.
 
Joined
Mar 27, 2018
Messages
123
#20



(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top