Restricted Debate Politics in the Upper South During the Secession Crisis in Late 1860

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Illinois
#1
I was scouring through newspapers from the Upper South in December 1860 today, specifically Fayetteville, North Carolina, in search of information on another topic, when I saw some articles about the states of the Upper South after Lincoln's election. I did not have time to read them as they were not generally related to what I was researching, but "Who Makes the Noise?" on Page 3 of the Fayetteville Weekly Observer on December 17, 1860, caught my eye. Its author argued states like South Carolina were outright wrong/lying about the issue of non-enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Act being a justification/motivation for secession given that argument was being made by states further south where runaways to the North was less of an issue than in the Upper South and also pointing out that separation of the slave states from the Union would make runaways a much bigger problem since the Fugitive Slave Act would no longer be relevant at all. They also pointed out that South Carolina had the luxury of being particularly aggressive in their rhetoric given they were insulated by the Upper South/Border States such as North Carolina and Virginia and predicted that secession would mean a war in which the Upper South would see and do most of the fighting. Indeed, North Carolina lost around 40,000 men in the Confederate service vs. South Carolina's loss of 12,992.
 

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Jan 12, 2016
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South Carolina
#2
but "Who Makes the Noise?" on Page 3 of the Fayetteville Weekly Observer on December 17, 1860, caught my eye. Its author argued states like South Carolina were outright wrong/lying about the issue of non-enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Act being a justification/motivation for secession given that argument was being made by states further south where runaways to the North was less of an issue than in the Upper South and also pointing out that separation of the slave states from the Union would make runaways a much bigger problem since the Fugitive Slave Act would no longer be relevant at all.
Paging James Lutzweiler - you had a thread on this very topic, I think.
 

OpnCoronet

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Feb 23, 2010
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#3
The thing to remember about the secession conventions, is that they were called into being, to secede, by those who were calling for those conventions, not to debate or deliberate on whether or not to secede.

With lincoln's election and the first calls for the conventions by the lower South, there were those leaders in the South who believed it was better to have the conventions and vote down secession. But when a leader of, I believe, Ga.'s opponent of secession, used the argument for Stephen Douglas, he replied if if they did not have to votes to to prevent the conventions, they would not have the votes to prevent secession.

Usually the biggest losers at the beginnings of a Revolution, are those who think politics as usual is sufficient.
 



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