Pickett's Colonel's - Eppa Hunton - 8th Virginia Infantry

Seth VA/NC

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Pickett had 13 colonel's who advanced on the Union Lines on July 3rd, 1863. Out of those 13, 5 of Colonels had served with Pickett since the Peninsula Campaign in 1862.

hunton eppa1.jpg


Probably the most well known and famous Colonel in Pickett's Division is Eppa Hunton of the 8th Virginia Infantry, Eppa Hunton was born September 22, 1822 in Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia . He worked as a teacher and later become a lawyer. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was commissioned as Colonel in the 8th Virginia Infantry, a regiment entirely made up of men from Northern Virginia. He lead the 8th Virginia at First Manassas and Leesburg. In Spring of 1862 it joined a new brigade of Virginian Infantry lead by Brigadier General George Pickett, He lead the 8th Virginia at Williamsburg and,Seven Pines, and Gaines Mill. Eppa Hunton took command of the brigade when George Pickett was wounded in his shoulder at Gaines Mill's and he lead the Brigade in Victories at Frazier's Farm and Second Manassas. During the campaigns of 1862, Colonel Hunton nicknamed his 8th Virginia "The Bloody Eighth." With the commission of a new Brigadier General Richard Brooke Garnett to command the brigade, Eppa Hunton returned as Colonel of the 8th Virginia which he lead at South Mountain, and General Pickett became a Divisional Commander of four Virginia Brigades. During Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg Eppa Hunton was severely wounded in the leg and his horse was killed. After recovering from his wound he would take over command of Pickett's Old Brigade, due to General Garnett being killed at Gettysburg. Now promoted to Brigadier General he would lead the remnants of Pickett's old brigade at Cold Harbor and Five Forks. Eppa Hunton would be captured at Saylor's Creek on April 6, 1865. He spent several months at the P.O.W. camp Fort Warren, he was released and paroled in July of 1865. He later became a career politician after the war, and was well known for defending General Pickett and his reputation from critics.
 

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War Horse

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Pickett had 13 colonel's who advanced on the Union Lines on July 3rd, 1863. Out of those 13, 5 of Colonels had served with Pickett since the Peninsula Campaign in 1862.

View attachment 44059

Probably the most well known and famous Colonel in Pickett's Division is Eppa Hunton of the 8th Virginia Infantry, Eppa Hunton was born September 22, 1822 in Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia . He worked as a teacher and later become a lawyer. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was commissioned as Colonel in the 8th Virginia Infantry, a regiment entirely made up of men from Northern Virginia. He lead the 8th Virginia at First Manassas and Leesburg. In Spring of 1862 it joined a new brigade of Virginian Infantry lead by Brigadier General George Pickett, He lead the 8th Virginia at Williamsburg and,Seven Pines, and Gaines Mill. Eppa Hunton took command of the brigade when George Pickett was wounded in his shoulder at Gaines Mill's and he lead the Brigade in Victories at Frazier's Farm and Second Manassas. During the campaigns of 1862, Colonel Hunton nicknamed his 8th Virginia "The Bloody Eighth." With the commission of a new Brigadier General Richard Brooke Garnett to command the brigade, Eppa Hunton returned as Colonel of the 8th Virginia which he lead at South Mountain, and General Pickett became a Divisional Commander of four Virginia Brigades. During Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg Eppa Hunton was severely wounded in the leg and his horse was killed. After recovering from his wound he would take over command of Pickett's Old Brigade, due to General Garnett being killed at Gettysburg. Now promoted to Brigadier General he would lead the remnants of Pickett's old brigade at Cold Harbor and Five Forks. Eppa Hunton would be captured at Saylor's Creek on April 6, 1865. He spent several months at the P.O.W. camp Fort Warren, he was released and paroled in July of 1865. He later became a career politician after the war, and was well known for defending General Pickett and his reputation from critics.
Your relative?
 

Seth VA/NC

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Your relative?
Oh No, my highest ranking relative was a sergeant, my family wasn't so rich at that time haha.

I just wanted to post all of Pickett's Colonels and Officers under his command, right now I am just trying to compile all the pictures and info, but can't find all the pictures yet.

Eppa Hunton lead "Pickett's" Brigade for a while, and took over after Garnett's Death.
 

War Horse

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Ok, I saw where you posted you had 3 relatives in the charge. This has been an excellent thread that I am enjoying very much. I like to learn more about 5 forks. Off to the web I go. Thanks again
 

Old Bay

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Hunton bought Mosby's house in 1877 in Warrenton (now the Mosby museum). He also lived, at one point, on Waterloo St. in Warrenton at an 1820s era residence which later became a restaurant called Napoleon's. It caught fire in July 2014 and was damaged quite severely. Not sure of the fate right now as a engineering firm is supposed to be checking whether it's salvageable or not.

My 3x great grandfather was with Hunton at Ball's Bluff (Leesburg) in the 8th Virginia. I read the Virginia Regimental Series book on the 8th and the author, John E. Divine, stated that Hunton was quite capable but never rose above brigadier due to fairly constant illness (with my usual caveat, if I recall correctly).

Mosby Museum
2eej6ys.jpg


Napoleon's
33tsegz.jpg
 
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Old Bay

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Sad to say that that the old Napoleon's has been demolished. Went by there on Wednesday and it's just a big hole in the ground now.
 

DaveBrt

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Hunton wrote an autobiography, published in 1933.

In late May, 1861, Lee ordered Col. Hunton to destroy the bridges and rolling stock of the Alexandria. Loudoun & Hampshire RR. Hunton destroyed the bridges, but not the rolling stock. He had an engineer officer remove the essential parts of the two locomotives he had and hide the parts. He arranged the cars to be easily set afire if the Federals approached. He reported his actions to Lee and they were approved.

On July 30th, Mr. (soon the be Captain) Thomas R. Sharp led a force of railroad men to retrieve the rolling stock. Col. Hunton provided security as the team hauled the two locomotives (and probably the cars) south from Leesburg, then west to the Piedmont Station on the Manassas Gap RR, where they were put on the tracks and restored to running order.

The two locomotives were the C. P. Manning and the Lewis McKenzie. The McKenzie was purchased from the Confederate Government by the Virginia Central RR and ran under the new name General Beauregard. The Manning ran on the Richmond, Frederickburg & Potomac RR under the name General Johnston.
 

Seth VA/NC

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Hunton bought Mosby's house in 1877 in Warrenton (now the Mosby museum). He also lived, at one point, on Waterloo St. in Warrenton at an 1820s era residence which later became a restaurant called Napoleon's. It caught fire in July 2014 and was damaged quite severely. Not sure of the fate right now as a engineering firm is supposed to be checking whether it's salvageable or not.

My 3x great grandfather was with Hunton at Ball's Bluff (Leesburg) in the 8th Virginia. I read the Virginia Regimental Series book on the 8th and the author, John E. Divine, stated that Hunton was quite capable but never rose above brigadier due to fairly constant illness (with my usual caveat, if I recall correctly).

Mosby Museum
2eej6ys.jpg


Napoleon's
33tsegz.jpg
His illness was a constant restraint on him, he feel ill during the middle of a battle as well (I think Frayser's Farm) with a fever,
 


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