Photos of 73rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Co. E)

Joined
May 21, 2013
Messages
28
#1
Hello,

Several years ago I learned by my g-g-g grandfather James Welch was a soldier with the Ohio 73rd Regiment, Company E. He was with them from 1861 through 1865 and was present at Gettysburg, Chancellorsville and many other memorable battles from the war. Through his 450 pension file and military service file I have been able to learn much about his life.

I am constantly looking for new information on the Ohio 73rd and have learned much from the biography of Samuel Hurst (also 73rd Reg OVI). However, I am ever looking for photos of this Regiment, particularly Company E. I am hoping that someone in this community might direct me towards new resources. I've scoured online sources and hope that perhaps in a private collection somewhere I might find photos of James or of this regiment. I do have one photo of the regiment in Chillicothe, Ohio and another of a reunion that took place in Ross County in the 1890s, but nothing else.

Is there anyone out there who might direct me towards new resources and perhaps avenues to discover photos of James Welch 73rd reg, Co E, Ohio Volunteer Infantry? Many thanks for your time and consideration and I am most grateful for any advice you all may have.

sincerely,

KCW
 

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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,464
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#2
Hello,

Several years ago I learned by my g-g-g grandfather James Welch was a soldier with the Ohio 73rd Regiment, Company E. He was with them from 1861 through 1865 and was present at Gettysburg, Chancellorsville and many other memorable battles from the war. Through his 450 pension file and military service file I have been able to learn much about his life.

I am constantly looking for new information on the Ohio 73rd and have learned much from the biography of Samuel Hurst (also 73rd Reg OVI). However, I am ever looking for photos of this Regiment, particularly Company E. I am hoping that someone in this community might direct me towards new resources. I've scoured online sources and hope that perhaps in a private collection somewhere I might find photos of James or of this regiment. I do have one photo of the regiment in Chillicothe, Ohio and another of a reunion that took place in Ross County in the 1890s, but nothing else.

Is there anyone out there who might direct me towards new resources and perhaps avenues to discover photos of James Welch 73rd reg, Co E, Ohio Volunteer Infantry? Many thanks for your time and consideration and I am most grateful for any advice you all may have.

sincerely,

KCW
James D. Welsh

Residence was not listed; 27 years old.

Enlisted on 10/12/1861 as a Private.

On 12/30/1861 he mustered into "E" Co. OH 73rd Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 7/13/1865 at Louisville, KY
(Mustered out by order of War Dept.)


He was listed as:
* Wounded 7/2/1863 Gettysburg, PA


Other Information:
born 7/24/1834 in Quarryville, Lancaster Co., PA
died 7/27/1905 in Hartwell, OH
Buried: Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, OH
Gravesite: 100-120-B3

(Parents: John & Catherine Welsh)

After the War he lived in Hartwell, OH

- Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio
Report of Maj. Samuel H. Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio Infantry.

HDQRS. SEVENTY-THIRD REGT. OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
Near Chattanooga, November 2, 1863.
CAPT.: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part
taken by this regiment in the actions of October 28 and 29 near Lookout
Creek:

In the afternoon of October 28, shortly after leaving Wauhatchie, in our
line of march toward Chattanooga, I was ordered to cross the Nashville
and Chattanooga Railroad and move the regiment forward
in line of battle, with its left touching the road, and ascertain whether
the enemy were in force in the dense woods in that direction. Having
made the dispositions indicated, and massed our front and right flank
with skirmishers, we moved forward until our line had passed that of the
First Brigade, Col. Buschbeck, with whom I was ordered to connect.
Here I halted the battalion while the skirmishers went forward to the
banks of Lookout Creek, where they communicated with the skirmishers
of the First Brigade, and assured themselves that the enemy was not in
force in that immediate vicinity, yet a running fire of skirmishers and
an attempt to burn the railroad bridge across the creek evidenced the
intention of the enemy to dispute our advance in that direction.

In the meantime, the enemy's batteries on the mountain were vigorously
engaged in shelling our position, which, however, resulted to us in no
casualties, save the slight wounding of 1 man. After remaining in this
position about half an hour, I was ordered to withdraw the regiment and
rejoin the brigade, which order I at once obeyed. On the morning of the
29th, while the Second Brigade, with the Seventy-third Ohio in the
advance, was moving to the support of Gen. Geary, at about 2
o'clock in the morning, I was ordered to form line of battle on the left
of the road and sweep through the woods on the west side of a range of
hills that ran parallel with the road on which we had been advancing. I
immediately sent forward Capt. Buchwalter, with instructions to
deploy his company (A) as skirmishers and move in the direction
indicated for the battalion. We then moved forward in line as rapidly as
possible, considering the irregularities of the ground, the dense growth
of underbrush, and the fallen timber. We had advanced, however, only
a few hundred yards when the enemy's skirmishers opened fire upon us
from the hill-tops on our left and from our front. I was ordered to wheel
the battalion to the left and charge the hill, and was informed that the
Thirty-third Massachusetts would connect with me on the left and move
up the hill in the same line of battle. I instructed Capt. Buchwalter to
move his skirmishers by the left into our new front and advanced in that
direction, in executing which order his line received a heavy volley from
an unseen force of the enemy on our right, and the gallant captain fell
mortally wounded.

We moved up the hill (steep and difficult though it was) for a hundred
paces, receiving an irregular fire from the enemy in our front. Then we
lay down and rested fora minute. The enemy's fire now indicated their
position and the direction of their line of battle. We had yet another
hundred paces to climb before we could use our bayonets, and we rose
up and moved forward again to the charge, cheering as we went, and
driving in the enemy's skirmishers. The heavily increasing fire of the
enemy provoked an occasional shot from our own lines in answer. Our
skirmishers had been constantly engaged and now their line opened right
and left, and we were confronted by the enemy's whole line of battle,
sheltered behind formidable breastworks on the crest of the hill. As we
came in sight of them in the clear moonlight they lowered their guns and
poured into our ranks a most deadly fire. Our boys began to fall rapidly,
but the ranks were instantly closed, and steadily, in the face of death,
our little battalion kept shouting and charging forward. The firing in our
front became so rapid and effective that I commanded the regiment to
answer it, which they did handsomely, still, however, continuing to
advance.

When we had approached within 2 or 3 rods of the enemy's breastworks
there opened upon us a most murderous fire from a force on our right
flank, completely enfilading our line. The appearance of this force on
our flank seemed to forbid our farther advance. I knew we had no
support on our right, and we had not held communication with the
Thirty-third Massachusetts at any time during the engagement.
Regarding the Seventy-third as the directing battalion, I had paid no
attention to our support on the left, and it was impossible for me to
learn whether Col. Underwood was advancing or not, while heavy
and irregular firing, with cries of "Don't fire upon your own men,"
coming from the left of our front, only increased the confusion. Under
the circumstances I deemed it rash to advance farther until I knew that
one, at least, of my flanks was protected. I ordered the regiment to
retire a few rods, which they did in perfect order, and lay down again,
while I sent Capt. Higgins to ascertain the position and movements of
the Thirty-third Massachusetts. Learning that, though they had fallen
back, they were again advancing, I was preparing to go forward also,
when information came that the Thirty-third had turned the enemy's
flank, was gallantly charging him in his breastworks, and driving him
from the left crest of the hill.

I immediately charged forward again, took and occupied the works and
hill in our own front, from which the enemy rapidly fled. The taking of
this hill had not been accomplished, however, without fearful cost.
One-half of my line officers and one-third of my men were either killed
our wounded in this brief but desperate struggle, and never had men
shown higher courage than characterized the work of that morning. A
full report of the casualties has already been forwarded. I cannot,
however, neglect to mention specially the lamented Capt. Buchwalter
(wounded and since dead), whose chivalrous spirit and high, manly, and
soldierly qualities won all hearts, and gave promise of a brilliant and
useful career.

Capt. Barnes, Lieut.'s McCommon, Hawkins, Talbott, and Martin
were among the wounded, and deserve honorable mention. They
behaved most gallantly in the fight, and their scars will be
remembrances of duty bravely done. But where all acted so nobly it
were invidious not to award them a just meed of praise. Those who
survived unscathed were no less courageous than their fallen comrades.
Capt. Higgins, acting major, behaved with his accustomed intrepidity,
being always in the thickest of the fight cheering the men forward.
Lieut.'s Hinson, Kinney, Downing, Stone, Peters and Davis, all
commanding companies, were connstantly with their men, inspiring
them with a sublime courage, and leading them with soldiery
determination against that wall of fire. Lieut. Hosler, acting
adjutant, assisted me efficiently, and the non-commissioned officers and
the men in the ranks did all that I could ask. With daring, dauntless
spirits, they attacked an enemy vastly superior in numbers and holding
a fortified and almost impregnable position, and drove them from that
position by the most heroic and desperate effort. It was an achievement
worthy the best men of a veteran army, and must add new luster to our
already honorable names, and make it a consideration of just and honest
pride to belong to the brave old Seventy-third.

I have the honor, captain, to subscribe myself, your obedient servant,

SAM'L H. HURST,
Maj., Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. B. F. STONE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 107-54 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA. AND N. GA.
[Series I. Vol. 31. Part I, Reports and Union Correspondence. Serial No. 54.]

*************************************************************************************

Report of Maj. Samuel H. Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio Infantry.

HDQRS. SEVENTY-THIRD OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.
Lookout Valley, Tennessee, December 22, 1863.
CAPT.: I have the honor to make the following report of the part
taken by the Seventy-third Ohio Regt. in the late campaign
beginning with the battle of Chattanooga and ending in the relief of
Knoxville, and the return of the corps to the old camping ground:

On the afternoon of November 23 when the army moved forward and
engaged the enemy in front of Chattanooga, the Eleventh Corps holding
the left of our line, this regiment was massed in column and
I was ordered to support the Fifty-fifth Ohio, which engaged the enemy at the point where our line of battle crossed
the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. We were held thus
in reserve until about 12 o'clock, November 24. The enemy's
sharpshooters kept up a very annoying fire along the front of the Second
Division, and could not be dislodged by our skirmishers. A small creak
ran between the two skirmish lines, and the enemy appeared to hold a
strong position on its opposite bank. I was ordered to cross this creek
near its mouth and charge the enemy in the woods, driving them from
the front off our division lines, or, at least, developing their position and
strength. Throwing the regiment across the creek, I sent forward
Companies A and B as skirmishers, and charged on the double-quick.
We drove in their skirmishers on the left and gained the rear of their
rifle-pits, cutting off about 30 men from their supports. These men at
once gave themselves up as prisoners. We gained a position behind the
embankment of the East Tennessee railroad almost 300 yards from its
crossing the Memphis road. Here we engaged the enemy's sharpshooters
in a clump of houses, and being ordered not to go farther forward, we
remained in this advanced position during the night.

Early next morning, in conjunction with the skirmishers of the Second
Brigade, we charged the enemy's skirmishers again, and drove them a
fourth of a mile, the left of our division moving forward and holding the
ground thus gained. In these charges the offices and men of the regiment
behaved with veteran coolness and courage, sustaining their high
character for gallantry in action.

This regiment took no further part in the battle at Chattanooga, but with
the brigade moved up the river to the Chickamauga from which place
on the following day we took up the line of march in pursuit of the
retreating foe. From Graysville we advanced with the brigade to
Parker's Gap, and thence to Red Clay, where we assisted in the
destruction of the railroad. Subsequently the regiment filled its place in
the brigade in the march through East Tennessee to the relief of
Knoxville, advancing as far as Louisville.
The men bore with a heroic spirit the rigors of this trying campaign.
May of them were without blankets and some without shoes, but cheered
by the welcome of loyal citizens and prompted by their own high
soldierly spirit, they did their duty well.

The casualties during the campaign were 1 wounded, 1 died during the
march, and 1 missing.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

SAML. H. HURST,
Maj., Comdg. Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

-----------

Capt. B. F. STONE.
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLIII.] THE CHATTANOOGA-RINGGOLD CAMPAIGN. PAGE 380-55
[Series I. Vol. 31. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 55.]

***************************************************************************************

Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel H. Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio Infantry.

HDQRS. 73D REGT. OHIO VETERAN VOL. INFANTRY,
Atlanta, Ga., September 23, 1864.
CAPT.: I have the honor, in obedience to orders, to report the
operations of this command from the 2d day of May, 1864, to the
20th of September, 1864:

On the 2d of May the regiment, with 318 guns left its camp in
Lookout Valley and, joining the march of the brigade, moved to
Gordon's Mills, on a branch of the Chickamauga, where we halted
for a day; again moving forward, we halted near Ringgold and sent
to the rear our surplus baggage; then we moved to Leet's farm,
and from there across Taylor's Ridge, via Gordon's Springs, and,
with the Army of the Cumberland, confronted the enemy at Buzzard
Roost. Here we skirmished for two days, losing 1 man.
Withdrawing, we moved with the brigade, via Snake Creek Gap,
upon Resaca; assisted in driving the enemy into his works at this
place, and having developed his position and engaged him with
slight loss, on the 15th of May we moved with brigade to the extreme
left of our army and joined in the attack and assault of that
day, which engagement resulted to us in killed and wounded in the
loss of 56 men. A full report of the part taken in that engagement
by this command has been duly forwarded.* On the following day
the regiment joined in the pursuit of the enemy, crossing Connesauga
and Coosawattee Rivers, and moving in a southerly direction.
On the 18th We again encountered the enemy on a wooded hill, across
which our route lay. On the following day we engaged the enemy's
skirmishers, who fell back toward Cassville. This regiment skirmished
in the direction of Kingston, and discovered the enemy
in strong force in our immediate front. We then fell back with
the brigade and threw up temporary defenses. Subsequently we
made a movement to the left and advanced to the seminary at Cassville;
drove the enemy's skirmishers into the village, and opened
fire on a column of troops passing through the place. Later we supported
a section of artillery on Seminary Hill, and kept up a brisk
skirmish until relieved by Col. Coburn, commanding Second
Brigade. We rested in this vicinity until the 23d of May, when we
again joined the column on the march; moved down and across the
Etowah River, leaving Allatoona Mountains on our left, and crossing
Burnt Hickory Ridge, met the enemy near Dallas and participated
in the battle fought by the Twentieth Corps on the 25th of
May. In this engagement this command lost 72 officers and men
in killed and wounded. After this the regiment joined in the successive
movements to the left, and on the 15th of June in support of
the First Brigade in a charge on the enemy's position near Pine
Mountain. On the 19th and 22d, successively, we were joined with
the brigade in charging the enemy and driving him within his main
works near Kenesaw, in which charges and skirmishes the regiment
lost 36 men killed and wounded. On the evening of the 22d of June
we were moved to the right of the corps, on the Powder Springs
road, where we remained several days, and until the enemy fell
back from Marietta, when we were advanced to the vicinity of the
Chattahoochee River. Here we had ten days of much needed rest.
On the 17th of July we were thrown across the Chattahoochee and
moved toward Buck Head. On the 20th of July we moved early and
crossed Peach Tree Creek in the rear of Gen. Newton's position,
occupying a place in the second line. My regiment supported and
relieved the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin during the engagement of this
day, with a loss to the command of 18 officers and men. On the 22d
we were again advanced as the enemy fell back to the defenses of
Atlanta. My command occupied temporarily a number of positions
during the investment of this placed with a loss of 15 men killed and
wounded. Falling back with the brigade to Turner's Ferry, when
the main army moved upon Jonesborough, we came forward again
and on the 4th of September took a position within the defenses of
Atlanta, where we have been encamped to the present time. The
campaign has been a severe one, the loss to this command in killed
and wounded alone being 210 men and 8 officers, but the courage,
the gallantry, the endurance, and determination of officers and men
alike have proven their high soldierly capabilities, while the confident
spirit of our troops gives full assurance that to our noble army
Atlanta is but the "Gate City."

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. H. HURST,
Lieut.-Col., Comdg. 73d Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Capt. C. H. YOUNG,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig., 3d Div., 20th Corps.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.--ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. PAGE 461-73
[Series I. Vol. 38. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 73.]

*************************************************************************************


Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel H. Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio Infantry,
of operations September 2-December 21.

HDQRS. SEVENTY-THIRD Regt. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,
Savannah, Ga., December 24, 1864.
CAPT.: In obedience to orders I have the honor to submit the
following report of the operations of my command from the time of the
occupation of Atlanta to the present date:

This command marched into and occupied a position in the defenses of
Atlanta on the 2d day of September, 1864. From that time to the 21st
of October the regiment performed picket-duty and worked upon the
new line of fortification projected for the defense of the city. On the
21st of October the regiment joined in an expedition commanded by
Col. Daniel Dustin. The expedition went about twenty miles due
east, collected over 800 wagons loads of forage, and returned to camp
at Atlanta in four days without loss to this command. On the 15th day
of November, 1864, this regiment moved from its camp in the defenses
of Atlanta and began the march across the State of Georgia, occupying
its position in the brigade in the line of march until it reached the
defenses of Savannah without a single casualty in the command. The
regiment assisted in destroying the railroad at Social Circle and at
Madison.

My command subsisted for thirty days almost wholly upon the products
of the country through which we passed.

I have to submit the following estimate of animals captured by my
command: 10 horses, 20 mules, 6 head beef-cattle.

I have also to submit and estimate of commissaries and forage captured
and used by the men and animals of my command; 200 hogs and pigs,
40 sheep, 2,000 chickens and turkeys, 100 bushels meal, 100 gallons
molasses, 1,000 pounds honey, 300 bushels sweet potatoes, 2,000
pounds flour, 1,000 pounds sugar, 300 bushels corn, and 1 ton of rough
forage.

The expedition was in nowise severe on this command. The health of
the men was excellent throughout the campaign.

I have the honor, captain, to subscribe myself your obedient servant,

SAML. H. HURST,
Lieut. Col., Cmdg. Seventy-third Ohio Vet. Vol. Infantry.

Capt. C. H. YOUNG,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig., 3d Div., 20th Army Corps.


Source: Official Records
PAGE 352-92 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. [CHAP. LVI.
[Series I. Vol. 44. Serial No. 92.]

*************************************************************************************
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,464
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#3
Hello,

Several years ago I learned by my g-g-g grandfather James Welch was a soldier with the Ohio 73rd Regiment, Company E. He was with them from 1861 through 1865 and was present at Gettysburg, Chancellorsville and many other memorable battles from the war. Through his 450 pension file and military service file I have been able to learn much about his life.

I am constantly looking for new information on the Ohio 73rd and have learned much from the biography of Samuel Hurst (also 73rd Reg OVI). However, I am ever looking for photos of this Regiment, particularly Company E. I am hoping that someone in this community might direct me towards new resources. I've scoured online sources and hope that perhaps in a private collection somewhere I might find photos of James or of this regiment. I do have one photo of the regiment in Chillicothe, Ohio and another of a reunion that took place in Ross County in the 1890s, but nothing else.

Is there anyone out there who might direct me towards new resources and perhaps avenues to discover photos of James Welch 73rd reg, Co E, Ohio Volunteer Infantry? Many thanks for your time and consideration and I am most grateful for any advice you all may have.

sincerely,

KCW
P339669.gif


Samuel Hoffman Hurst, Colonel of the 73rd Ohio Infantry

Residence was not listed; 30 years old.

Enlisted on 11/7/1861 as a Captain.

On 12/30/1861 he was commissioned into "A" Co. OH 73rd Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 7/20/1865 at Louisville, KY


Promotions:
* Major 6/21/1862
* Lt Colonel 2/17/1864
* Colonel 7/13/1864 (Not Mustered)
* Colonel 3/13/1865 by Brevet
* Brig-General 3/13/1865 by Brevet


Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* 6/21/1862 from company A to Field & Staff


Other Information:
born 9/22/1831 in Union Twp., Ross County, OH
died 7/28/1908 in Chillicothe, OH

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio
- Ohio in the War
- Adjutant General's Office General Order #133, August 22, 1865
- Dyer: A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion
- Heitman: Register of United States Army 1789-1903
- Brevet Brigadier Generals in Blue
- Photo courtesy of Massachusetts Commandery of MOLLUS
 
Joined
May 21, 2013
Messages
28
#4
Hi there,

Thanks so much for the information. It's true that James enlisted in 1861 and was discharged in KY in 1865. He was also wounded in Gettsburg as you mentioned. However, the information below is not correct:

Other Information:
born 7/24/1834 in Quarryville, Lancaster Co., PA
died 7/27/1905 in Hartwell, OH
Buried: Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, OH
Gravesite: 100-120-B3
(Parents: John & Catherine Welsh) After the War he lived in Hartwell, OH

James was born in County Kerry, Ireland around 1831 to unknown parents. He came to Ohio in the mid 1850s and married a woman named Ellen Kane. They had three children named John, Edward and Mary and possibly a daughter named Amanda who died as a baby or child. His military service and pension file (more than 450 pages) list more than 50 years of pensions applications and mostly rejections for increase in pension. It took me over a year, but I transcribed the entire 450 pages in to MSWord. James died in a Dayton, Ohio military hospital in 1913 after he broke his him.

I'm dying to find other photos and information about James and the Ohio 73rd. I've read Hurst's book and his personal diary but would love to find more photos of the regiment. I know James must have had a photo taken, but for the life of me I don't know where to look. I'm guessing it might be impossible to find such a photo, but you never know. I'd love to hear from anyone out there that might have photos of the Ohio 73rd in there private collection etc. Thanks!

- KCW
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,464
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#6
Hi there,

Thanks so much for the information. It's true that James enlisted in 1861 and was discharged in KY in 1865. He was also wounded in Gettsburg as you mentioned. However, the information below is not correct:

Other Information:
born 7/24/1834 in Quarryville, Lancaster Co., PA
died 7/27/1905 in Hartwell, OH
Buried: Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, OH
Gravesite: 100-120-B3
(Parents: John & Catherine Welsh) After the War he lived in Hartwell, OH

James was born in County Kerry, Ireland around 1831 to unknown parents. He came to Ohio in the mid 1850s and married a woman named Ellen Kane. They had three children named John, Edward and Mary and possibly a daughter named Amanda who died as a baby or child. His military service and pension file (more than 450 pages) list more than 50 years of pensions applications and mostly rejections for increase in pension. It took me over a year, but I transcribed the entire 450 pages in to MSWord. James died in a Dayton, Ohio military hospital in 1913 after he broke his him.

I'm dying to find other photos and information about James and the Ohio 73rd. I've read Hurst's book and his personal diary but would love to find more photos of the regiment. I know James must have had a photo taken, but for the life of me I don't know where to look. I'm guessing it might be impossible to find such a photo, but you never know. I'd love to hear from anyone out there that might have photos of the Ohio 73rd in there private collection etc. Thanks!

- KCW
Three Other members of the 73rd. I can post four others if you're interested. Sorry, none of them is your ancestor.
P363072.gif

Robert Edes Beecher

Residence was not listed; 33 years old.

Enlisted on 9/16/1862 as a 1st Sergeant.

On 9/16/1862 he mustered into "I" Co. OH 73rd Infantry
He was discharged for promotion on 6/30/1864

On 6/30/1864 he was commissioned into US Volunteers Adjutant Genl Dept
He was Mustered Out on 9/19/1865


Promotions:
* 2nd Lieut 9/18/1862 (As of Co. C)
* Capt 6/30/1864 (Captain & Asst Adjutant General)
* Major 3/13/1865 by Brevet
* Lt Colonel 3/13/1865 by Brevet


Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* 9/18/1862 from company I to company C
* 3/13/1863 from company C to company E


Other Information:
born in 1829 in Ohio
Member of GAR Post # 140 (Hubbard V. Smith) in Athol, MA


After the War he lived in Athol, MA

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio
- Heitman: Register of United States Army 1789-1903
- GAR Dept of Massachusetts 1866-1947 (Sargent)
P344276.gif

Richard Enderlin

Residence was not listed; 18 years old.

Enlisted on 11/19/1861 at Chillicothe, Ross Co., OH as a Musician.

On 12/15/1861 he mustered into "B" Co. OH 73rd Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 5/30/1865 at Camp Chase, OH


Promotions:
* Sergt 7/1/1863


Other Information:
born 1/11/1843 in Germany
died 2/11/1930 in Chillicothe, OH
Buried: Grandview Cemetery, Chillicothe, OH

Medal of Honor Information:
He was awarded the Medal of Honor
for action on 7/1/1863 at Gettysburg, PA.
(Voluntarily took rifle and served in ranks; rescued
a wounded comrade)

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio
- Deeds of Valor. How our Soldier-heroes won the Medal of Honor
- Medal of Honor Recipients 1863-1994
P350448.gif

William R. Farlow

Residence Ross County OH; an 18 year-old Farmer.

Enlisted on 11/12/1861 as a Private.

On 12/30/1861 he mustered into "C" Co. OH 73rd Infantry
He was discharged for wounds on 12/31/1862

On 5/2/1864 he was commissioned into "H" Co. OH 149th Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 8/30/1864 at Camp Dennison, OH


He was listed as:
* Wounded 8/30/1862 2nd Bull Run, VA


Promotions:
* Capt 5/2/1864 (As of Co. H 149th OH Infantry)


Other Information:
born 3/10/1843 in Ross County, OH
died 4/24/1921
Buried: Lincoln Cemetery, Wells County, IN

(Married Mary Alice McCrumb)

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio
- Research by Mark Davis
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
 
Joined
May 21, 2013
Messages
28
#7
Wow thanks for posting these. It's interesting to see some of the other soldiers from the Regiment. I'd be interested in seeing the others as well. The article that was posted was also fascinating. I was just Columbus recently doing research. I wonder what ever happened to the flag? I'd be interested in seeing it.

Do you have any other ideas where I might search for other photos of the Regiment and Co E in particular? Thanks so much for this great information!!!
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,464
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#9
Wow thanks for posting these. It's interesting to see some of the other soldiers from the Regiment. I'd be interested in seeing the others as well. The article that was posted was also fascinating. I was just Columbus recently doing research. I wonder what ever happened to the flag? I'd be interested in seeing it.

Do you have any other ideas where I might search for other photos of the Regiment and Co E in particular? Thanks so much for this great information!!!

Flag of the 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry : http://www.ohiocivilwar150.org/omeka/items/show/1376
 

ExNavyPilot

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2010
Messages
2,967
Location
Chesapeake, VA
#10
Many soldiers never did get pictures of themselves made during the war. The CDVs were rather pricey and a luxury for farmers and laborers. I've only found one photo of an ancestor of mine in uniform. Found many photos of them after the war as older men. That being said, keep looking. You might just get lucky, especially considering that previously unseen archives are being digitized and made available on the internet every so often.
 
Joined
May 21, 2013
Messages
28
#12
Thanks for the info. I'll keep searching for sure. Does anyone out there know how I get copies of the followin articles pertaining to the Ohio 73rd Regiment? Are they online somewhere? If not, who do I obtain copies? Thank you!

  • National Tribune. The 73rd Ohio at Gettysburg. Henry H. Gushee. December 24th, 1908
  • National Tribune. Ohio at Gettysburg. F. Marion Cline. 73rd O.V.I. May 8th, 1913
  • National Tribune. How He Saw Lincoln. Josephus Cunningham. 73rd O.V.I. March 18th, 1926
  • National Tribune. How One Soldier Saw Honest Abe. J. Cunningham. December 12th, 1940
 
Joined
May 15, 2015
Messages
5
#16
My avatar is Willis Shattuck who served in the 73rd OVVI from February 1864-July 1865. This is Samuel "Ake" Shattuck (who I believe to be his cousin) also a veteran of the 73rd.
View attachment 29430
The 73rd marches down Paint St in Chilicothe, Feb 1864. Willis would be in the last rank, Co. K
View attachment 29431

Great photo!

I have 2 ancestors who served in the 73rd Regiment, Company C, Ohio Voluntary Infantry.

Howard A. Turner, Sr., Corporal (Nov 1861 - Sep 1862)
Howard A. Turner, Jr., Musician (Nov 1861 - Dec 1864) -- Age 15

Jr. was likely in the above photo as he was present in Jan-Feb Company Muster roll

I know finding specific pictures of the Father and/or Son is not likely. But more photos of the 73rd where Company C can be seen would be great.

Any help, pointers or other pics?
 

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