Photographs Above The Clouds, A Battle Remembered Forever

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JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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nurse grave babcock.JPG

Nurse Grace Babcock's close up doesn't do justice to her determination to have a portrait taken Above The Clouds in Tennessee. Photographer Thomas Merritt of Nashville deserves some credit, too.

nurse whole pic.JPG

As if nursing wounded in the middle of a war wasn't hazardous enough, Mrs. Grace Babcock climbed far above her hospital duties, perhaps an image sent to a husband elsewhere in the war. LoC.

Lookout Mountain, Tennessee was a landmark before two Major Generals threw their armies into the sky, battling it out " Above The Clouds ". Hooker and Stevens made it massive, timeless memorial. Numbers seem to vary, 408 Union men died there, captured or missing were over a thousand Confederates with around half the casualties Hooker's army suffered. So it could be thought negligible- if one death isn't too many- compared to losses at Antietam, Cold Harbor and Gettysburg. It wasn't. Lookout Mountain's loss by the Confederate army has been described as one of the turning points of the war- although please no one think I know enough to argue the point. Great synopsis here.
http://www.aboutnorthgeorgia.com/ang/Battle_of_Lookout_Mountain

Captain John Wilson's 8th Kentucky Infantry re-play their climb to plant their flag- since the battle was November, 1863 and this Linn photo dates from 1863, it must have been only a month or so later.
lookout capt wilson.JPG


" The Battle Above The Clouds " was quite literal, troops were both impeded and helped by fog. It captured a nation's attention and imagination, an unlikely battlefield became a tourist spot by the time the fog lifted. Helped hugely by business from the Federal camps, an intrepid photographer perched his studio on a cliff and opened shop. Ohio brothers Robert and J.B. Linn made a huge success- soldiers, civilians, officers, their wives and sweethearts ( and their kids! ) stood, sat, leaned and clung to those rocks, commemorating the day they felt intrepid with a photograph to prove it. War era photos proliferate and you just know for each one we see, around 20 more are in private collections or still waiting to be discovered in that trunk in an attic.

lookout families military.jpg

There's a small boy in this group, military families made the trek but bet there's a mother in there not happy to have her son enjoying the view. Have a shot of an entire group, just children.

The Linn brother's " Gallery Point Lookout " really was perched on a cliff. There's another thread ( mine, I'm not swiping anyone's promise! ), where Linn's studio comes up. Photographs from Lookout have always fascinated me, can't be the only one. A Linn peer, a man named Roper fell to his death from Roper's Rock- not named for the photographer's fatal fall but ( and this is really bizarre ) yet another man named Roper who also died there- a Pennsylvania soldier. No one knows if Roper worked for Robert and J.B., may not have. The Linns were the first but you'll see images bearing the address of photographers from as far away as Norristown, PA.

photo shop linn lookout.jpg

Linn's studio, can't remember where I found this- if it was Pinterest, which I trusted for 20 minutes years ago with accuracy, may not be the genuine thing but think it is? Found it a few years ago and the ID is missing in my files. It's the shop's foundation resting on a cliff edge that gets you.

lookout man and house.JPG

No idea what the structure may be- half of a double spread, cropped. Makes your toes curl.

The Linn gallery operated until 1886, J.B. running it alone after his brother's death in 1872. Among a plethora of images given us by Linn and others, war era photos are the most fascinating. Troops stationed anywhere nearby- and that's the Tennessee River down there, military camps, HQ's and depots scattered over miles, made the trek.

lookout miss ed w river.JPG

Another hand's down favorite- Miss Edwards seems unhappy. I'm with her. No problems with snakes, spiders, rodents ( except for rats ) or dark nights. Hate the bejammers out of extreme heights.

Tons more, choosing this one as terribly significant. It seems a little post war, not much. She's a widow, I think and it doesn't take a leap of faith to feel perhaps she's visiting the place a battle took her husband from her. Where it all began, November 24th, 1863. The Battle Above The Clouds.

lookout officers.JPG


widow.JPG
 

AnnaLee

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No problems with snakes, spiders, rodents ( except for rats ) or dark nights. Hate the bejammers out of extreme heights.
Well Annie, I am afraid of snakes, especially poisonous ones, and I also do not like extreme heights.
One thing about the ladies in these pics that concerns me is the long dresses they wear which could easily trip them leading to falling over the edge.
 
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Ole Miss

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Beautiful Photos! I went to school for 2 years (1967-69) at the University of Chattanooga and spent many hours exploring Lookout Mountain but never near the edge!! Beautiful views in every direction but must remember it gets very windy up there and is dangerous on the edges!
Regards
David
 

ucvrelics

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Love the photo but she is not even as close as she could get. I remember my brother and I getting a photo made on the next rock down, That was over 55 years ago. I would not get that close now. Older and Wiser:D
 
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Thanks for sharing the photos many of which I have never seen. I live about 1/2 mile below these bluffs and the Cravens House near Ruby Falls. I have climbed on and around these rocks ever since I was a kid and sometimes live on the edge but I would never get that close! The wind can be gusty at times. Over the years several people have died from falling off sunset rock which is on the other side of Point Park. I was on a web site a few days ago and discovered that a few women fought in The Battle Of Lookout Mountain. They were in the Union ranks and had changed their names and dressed as men. This was discovered after one was killed and the other one wounded.
 

Belle Montgomery

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View attachment 293548
Nurse Grace Babcock's close up doesn't do justice to her determination to have a portrait taken Above The Clouds in Tennessee. Photographer Thomas Merritt of Nashville deserves some credit, too.

View attachment 293549
As if nursing wounded in the middle of a war wasn't hazardous enough, Mrs. Grace Babcock climbed far above her hospital duties, perhaps an image sent to a husband elsewhere in the war. LoC.

Lookout Mountain, Tennessee was a landmark before two Major Generals threw their armies into the sky, battling it out " Above The Clouds ". Hooker and Stevens made it massive, timeless memorial. Numbers seem to vary, 408 Union men died there, captured or missing were over a thousand Confederates with around half the casualties Hooker's army suffered. So it could be thought negligible- if one death isn't too many- compared to losses at Antietam, Cold Harbor and Gettysburg. It wasn't. Lookout Mountain's loss by the Confederate army has been described as one of the turning points of the war- although please no one think I know enough to argue the point. Great synopsis here.
http://www.aboutnorthgeorgia.com/ang/Battle_of_Lookout_Mountain

Captain John Wilson's 8th Kentucky Infantry re-play their climb to plant their flag- since the battle was November, 1863 and this Linn photo dates from 1863, it must have been only a month or so later.
View attachment 293551

" The Battle Above The Clouds " was quite literal, troops were both impeded and helped by fog. It captured a nation's attention and imagination, an unlikely battlefield became a tourist spot by the time the fog lifted. Helped hugely by business from the Federal camps, an intrepid photographer perched his studio on a cliff and opened shop. Ohio brothers Robert and J.B. Linn made a huge success- soldiers, civilians, officers, their wives and sweethearts ( and their kids! ) stood, sat, leaned and clung to those rocks, commemorating the day they felt intrepid with a photograph to prove it. War era photos proliferate and you just know for each one we see, around 20 more are in private collections or still waiting to be discovered in that trunk in an attic.

View attachment 293552
There's a small boy in this group, military families made the trek but bet there's a mother in there not happy to have her son enjoying the view. Have a shot of an entire group, just children.

The Linn brother's " Gallery Point Lookout " really was perched on a cliff. There's another thread ( mine, I'm not swiping anyone's promise! ), where Linn's studio comes up. Photographs from Lookout have always fascinated me, can't be the only one. A Linn peer, a man named Roper fell to his death from Roper's Rock- not named for the photographer's fatal fall but ( and this is really bizarre ) yet another man named Roper who also died there- a Pennsylvania soldier. No one knows if Roper worked for Robert and J.B., may not have. The Linns were the first but you'll see images bearing the address of photographers from as far away as Norristown, PA.

View attachment 293545
Linn's studio, can't remember where I found this- if it was Pinterest, which I trusted for 20 minutes years ago with accuracy, may not be the genuine thing but think it is? Found it a few years ago and the ID is missing in my files. It's the shop's foundation resting on a cliff edge that gets you.

View attachment 293553
No idea what the structure may be- half of a double spread, cropped. Makes your toes curl.

The Linn gallery operated until 1886, J.B. running it alone after his brother's death in 1872. Among a plethora of images given us by Linn and others, war era photos are the most fascinating. Troops stationed anywhere nearby- and that's the Tennessee River down there, military camps, HQ's and depots scattered over miles, made the trek.

View attachment 293554
Another hand's down favorite- Miss Edwards seems unhappy. I'm with her. No problems with snakes, spiders, rodents ( except for rats ) or dark nights. Hate the bejammers out of extreme heights.

Tons more, choosing this one as terribly significant. It seems a little post war, not much. She's a widow, I think and it doesn't take a leap of faith to feel perhaps she's visiting the place a battle took her husband from her. Where it all began, November 24th, 1863. The Battle Above The Clouds.

View attachment 293555

View attachment 293558
OMG! I get dizzy just looking at the photos!
 
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