History Peach Cobbler Day

Northern Light

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Tomorrow is Peach Cobbler Day. Now, I love peaches. I can eat them by the basketful when they are in season, however, call me weird, but I don't care for cooked peaches, especially hot cooked peaches, so I just decided to talk about cobblers in general.

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Cobblers it would seem are a North American invention, an adaptation of the steamed puddings that the Brits loved, but were hard to source ingredients for on this side of the pond. So as necessity is the mother of invention the cobbler was born. Cobblers can be made with almost any type of fruit, so what ever is in season was used. they can also be first course option made with meat or fish.
Early attempts to adapt the popular desserts to the primitive cooking equipment available in the new land and to make use of the local fruits led to the creation of the cobbler.

According to "The Wise Geek": Since they didn’t have brick ovens, the colonial cooks baked the fruit cobblers in pots over an open fire. They first made a filling of fruit and placed it into the pot. Then they added a skin of dough over the filling and covered the pot with a lid. As the cobblers cooked, the filling stewed and created its own juice and sauce, while the pastry puffed up and dried.

The new cobbler recipes required only a fraction of the flour required for a loaf of bread and allowed the cooks to use the fruits that were readily available. The various cobblers could feed large numbers of people, and the dishes were both nourishing and sustaining. The early colonists loved these juicy, fruit dishes so much that they were originally served as the main course for supper and for breakfast. It was not until the late 19th century as a greater variety of foods and ingredients became available that cobblers became primarily a dessert dish.

The "World's Largest Peach Cobbler" can be seen and tasted at the annual Georgia Peach Festival. This huge dish is 11 by five feet (about three by two meters) and eight inches (about 20 centimeters) deep. The recipe requires 75 gallons (285 liters) of local peaches, 90 pounds of real butter, 32 gallons (about 122 liters) of whole milk, 150 pounds of wheat flour, and 150 pounds of sugar.

This giant peach cobbler is so enormous that it must be baked in a custom-designed brick oven and the clean floor panels of school buses are used for baking pans. The baking process takes five hours to complete and starts with dividing the ingredients into five work stations that are manned by eight people. All of the ingredients are mixed in large, clean trash cans and stirred with boat paddles. Festival goers bring their own containers and can take home as much peach cobbler as they can handle."
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-peach-cobbler.htm

Cobblers have a lot of relatives, which might look a bit different from each other but have one commonality; they are delicious and good for you, well compared to some desserts, anyway. Some of these relatives are; tarts, pies, tortes, pandowdys, grunts, slumps, buckles, crisps, croustades, bird's nest pudding or crow's nest pudding, and z(s)onkers.
So, now that we have a knowledge base for cobblers, let get to the good part, The Recipes.
Peach Cobbler

  • Servings: 8

Source: Martha Stewart Living Television, July
  • 10 ripe peaches, pitted and sliced (2 quarts)
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons dark-brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 large egg
  • 2/3 cup heavy cream
  • Vanilla ice cream, or whipped cream, for serving
Directions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place peaches, cornstarch, dark-brown sugar, and cinnamon in a large bowl. Toss until well combined. Pour mixture into an 8 1/2-by-11 1/2-inch baking dish.

  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, 1/4 cup granulated sugar, the baking powder, and salt. Using a fork, two knives, or a pastry blender, cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse meal.

  3. Whisk together egg and cream in a liquid-measuring cup. Slowly add this mixture to dry ingredients; mix with a fork until dough just comes together. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured board, and roughly shape into a 12-inch log. Using a bench scraper, cut log into twelve equal portions.

  4. Place rough balls of dough on top of peach mixture. Sprinkle with remaining 2 tablespoons granulated sugar. Bake until golden brown, about 45 minutes. Transfer pan to a rack, and let cool slightly. Serve with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.
Easy, Foolproof Cobbler for Any Fruit
http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-easy-foolproof-cobbler-54973
makes enough for a 9x9 baking dish
1 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 cups sugar, plus a bit more for sprinkling
1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, melted
fresh berries or fruit (peeled and cut into chunks)

Combine the flour and sugar. Add the butter, mixing as you go, until the mixture forms a soft dough. It can be slightly crumbly, but you want it to hold together when you squeeze it.

Spray a baking dish with non-stick cooking spray. Put the fruit in the dish -- you will probably need about 4 cups of berries or chopped fruit. You want to create a thick layer that comes about two inches up the sides.
If the fruit is particularly tart, sprinkle with a light layer of sugar. If the fruit is soft and sweet, you don't need it.

Take the dough by the handful and pat it into disks that are about 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick. Lay them on top of the fruit, continuing with the patties, until it is covered. Bake the cobbler at 350 degrees for about 45-50 minutes, until the crust is light golden brown. Let cool slightly, then serve with ice cream.










 

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MRB1863

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#2
Like mostly all fruit cobblers - peach, apple, cherry, berry...especially like the topping. There's something about those "crunchies" on the top when mixed with the soft fruit filling or ice cream. Now I'm hungry again. We just finished a roast beef dinner a few hours ago. I guess I never met a calorie I didn't like!!!
 

hanna260

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#4
Well... if we're talking about cobblers in general... I adore apple cobbler.

And here's a recipe for Aretha Franklin's Peach cobbler.

Ingredients

10 (8 1/2-ounce) cans sliced peaches, drained
2 sticks unsalted butter, divided, 1 stick cut into small pieces
1 cup sugar, plus 1/4 cup
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1/2 cup plain bread crumbs
2 store bought refrigerated pie doughs
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
Canola oil spray
1 pint vanilla ice cream, for serving

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large saucepan, add peaches, 1 stick of butter, 1 cup of sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg and bring to a simmer. Add bread crumbs and stir. Using a sprinkle of flour, roll out both pie crusts; 1 will be used for the top of the cobbler and 1 for the bottom.

Spray a 10-inch square pan with canola oil and place 1 layer of dough into the baking dish. Place a few chips of butter, as well as a dusting of the remaining sugar, on the bottom crust. Pour the peach mixture into the baking dish. Cut the top layer of dough into strips and arrange them on the top of the peaches in a lattice pattern. Top with 3 or 4 chips of butter and bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until the crust is brown and the peaches are bubbling. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

This is not my own recipe and you can read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/aretha-franklins-peach-cobbler-recipe.html?oc=linkback.

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#7
We used to have a bunch of terribly neglected peach trees out in the back pasture. The fruit was too small and beat up to be good for much, but cobbler covers a multitude of sins... Every summer we would have lovely cobbler made with fresh peaches. Sadly time and storms have done for the peach trees now.

The best cobbler locally comes from Cousin's gas station in Piperton at the corner of 196 and 72. Seriously! They make a great grilled bologna sandwich too. I honestly hate bologna but they somehow make it delicious. For a gas station in the middle of nowhere it's haute cuisine.

You know what doesn't make good cobbler? Overripe bananas. When I was still in college and engaged to my now-husband, he and his best friend decided to impress us ladies by making cobbler but they only fruit on hand was bananas. Their experiment came out smelling like burnt rubber bands and tasted about like it smelled.
 

diane

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#8
We used to have a bunch of terribly neglected peach trees out in the back pasture. The fruit was too small and beat up to be good for much, but cobbler covers a multitude of sins... Every summer we would have lovely cobbler made with fresh peaches. Sadly time and storms have done for the peach trees now.

The best cobbler locally comes from Cousin's gas station in Piperton at the corner of 196 and 72. Seriously! They make a great grilled bologna sandwich too. I honestly hate bologna but they somehow make it delicious. For a gas station in the middle of nowhere it's haute cuisine.

You know what doesn't make good cobbler? Overripe bananas. When I was still in college and engaged to my now-husband, he and his best friend decided to impress us ladies by making cobbler but they only fruit on hand was bananas. Their experiment came out smelling like burnt rubber bands and tasted about like it smelled.
:rofl: Banana cobbler is right up there with my cantaloupe pie. Even the dogs wouldn't eat it - they pulled their heads into their shoulders, looked at me like they couldn't believe I'd try to poison them, and set about giving it a decent burial!
 

MRB1863

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#9
:rofl: Banana cobbler is right up there with my cantaloupe pie. Even the dogs wouldn't eat it - they pulled their heads into their shoulders, looked at me like they couldn't believe I'd try to poison them, and set about giving it a decent burial!
I'll take your dog's advice! Let's stick with Peach Cobbler. Smart dogs!
 

DR_Hanna

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#10
The best cobbler locally comes from Cousin's gas station in Piperton at the corner of 196 and 72. Seriously! They make a great grilled bologna sandwich too.
You mean this Cousin's?
I knew we should have taken the northern route to Oklahoma City from Atlanta last year.
It is a comfort to know there is still a place where a body can get a grilled Bologna sandwich followed by Cobbler and Ice Cream. Hog heaven.
 
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#15
They really should change Peach Cobbler Day to a time when peaches are in season!

Apples, cherries, strawberries, blueberries, rhubarb are all good! At least in some places, strawberries and rhubarb should both be coming into season, and the combination is excellent.

I've never made anything out of Bartlett pears, because I eat the raw pears up right away!
 

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