{⋆★⋆} BG Palmer, Joseph B.

Joseph Benjamin Palmer

General Palmer.jpg

Born: November 1, 1825

Birthplace: Rutherford County Tennessee

Father: Dr. William Howard Palmer 1801 – 1852

Mother: Mildred Ann Johns 1805 – 1833

Wife: Margaret J. Ballentine 1830 – 1886
(Buried: Maplewood Cemetery Pulaski Tennessee)​

Children:

Horace Edward Palmer 1855 – 1912​
(Buried: Evergreen Cemetery Murfreesboro Tennessee)​

Education:

Graduated from Union University in Murfreesboro Tennessee​

Occupation:

Attorney in Murfreesboro Tennessee​
Member of Tennessee State General Assembly​
1855 – 1859: Mayor of Murfreesboro Tennessee​

Civil War Career:

1861: Captain in 18th Tennessee Infantry Regiment​
1861 – 1864: Colonel of 18th Tennessee Infantry Regiment​
1862: Part of the Garrison that Surrendered at Fort Donelson​
1863: Wounded in right shoulder & right leg Battle of Stones River​
1863: Wounded in the right shoulder during the Battle of Chickamuga​
1863: District Commander in the Department of Tennessee​
1864: Participated in the Atlanta Campaign​
1864: Wounded during the Battle of Jonesborough​
1864 – 1865: Brigadier General of Confederate Army Infantry​
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1864: Participated in the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee​
1864: Part of the rearguard during the Battle of Nashville, Tennessee​
1865: Wounded during the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina​
1865: Surrendered and Paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina​

1866: Pardoned by the United States Government​
Occupation after War:
1865 – 1890: Attorney in Murfreesboro, Tennessee​

Died: November 4, 1890

Place of Death: Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Cause of Death: Heart Attack

Age at time of Death: 65 years old

Burial Place: Evergreen Cemetery, Murfreesboro, Tennessee


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Seduzal

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Location
Canton, North Carolina
Thanks for sharing this awesome article and photos. Never seen or heard this before learning something new. Also another piece of Civil War history found.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
In the final reorganization he was given a brigade composed of 38 Tennessee regiments and 2 battalions which were consolidated into four regiments.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
The biography that I'm reading, Stewart Sifkis's Who Was Who in the Civil War, lists Palmer's wounds 3 at Murfreesboro, 1 at Chickamauga, 1 Jonesboro and 1 at Bentonville.
 

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
General Palmer’s post war home is for sale. He built it on Main Street in Murfreesboro, Tennessee a couple of blocks east of the square. The house has been lovingly renovated by another general & his wife. It is a beautiful place. There is a tennis court & guest house. Because she had bad arthritis, there is an elevator. The house is a short walk from a grocery store, restaurants, summer concerts, Saturday farmer’s market & all the parades come to you. I live a few blocks away & can attest to what a great place the old part of Murfreesboro is. Your family could form up with us as living history volunteers at Stones River National Battlefield.
 

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Palmer was an exceptional leader. For me, the outstanding example of his executive ability came during the waning hours of the first day at Stones River. General Bragg ordered Palmer to charge Union Gen. Hazen’s position at the Round Forrest. That was the hinge pin on which General Rosecrans’ line had bent back & held. Palmer lined his men up for the attack. In front of him was a scene of indescribable horror. The repeated piecemeal attacks that Bragg & General Polk had ordered to break the union line at that critical point had left a literal carpet of bodies laying along the line of advance. Numerous letters & journal entries stated that it was possible to walk from the starting line 1/2 mile to the swale in front of Hazen’s line where survivors went to ground stepping on bodies w/o touching the ground.
Unlike the commanders before him, Palmer reconnoitered the ground & ordered his me to fall back into the trees. Darkness settled in as firing along the line sputtered out. Refusing to order the futile attack was a decision of equal parts tactical rationality & moral courage. One of the units that preceded Palmer suffered 82% casualties, no wounded, no POW’s.
 

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