Our Civil, Civil War Ancestors, Playing Nice With Each Other

Rebforever

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Oct 26, 2012
Messages
10,064
#21
I ' think ' @Rebforever means it's all talk, no manners and we're dreaming if we think there are manners around. Which is odd from someone his generation whose children probably knew ' Yes ma'am ' and " No, thank you ' before they could tie their shoes. If it isn't dreaming for most of us who grew up with it and insisted on the same thing with our children, no reason to think it can't survive for more generations.
I still say that today. Now the attack is being made against using ma’am.
I hear my daughter use polite words. My Grands not so much.
 

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byron ed

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
2,546
Location
Midwest
#22
I ' think ' @Rebforever means it's all talk, no manners and we're dreaming if we think there are manners around. Which is odd from someone his generation whose children probably knew ' Yes ma'am ' and " No, thank you ' before they could tie their shoes. If it isn't dreaming for most of us who grew up with it and insisted on the same thing with our children, no reason to think it can't survive for more generations.
A business associate was floored that I'd pull a chair back for her at a luncheon, not thinking too much about it I thought oops, perhaps I shouldn't have. Same thing for opening doors for a woman, or seeing that any lone woman reaches her car after an event before driving off myself. In those cases it applies to elderly as well so I haven't sensed it was award for them.

These 19th century manners are passe? I'm a fossil?
 



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