Order of Battle for the Army of Northern Virginia, June 1862

Joined
Aug 7, 2019
INTRODUCTION :
* During the Seven Days battles, Lee's greatest failure as an army commander was (in my opinion) to communicate properly with too many subordinates. As a result, the Federals had the upper hand at the tactical level in the majority of the battles fought near Richmond, while inflicting severe losses to their Confederate counterparts.

* These losses could have been avoided, or at least reduced, if a good army organization had been put in place before the fight. However, many problems come to my mind when asking myself how could it be possible to create a near-perfect military tool with so much "difficult" officers and troops from different states mixing together.

* The following order of battle is my first try, I'm mainly dealing with infantry (sub-)units for the moment. Anyone is allowed to rearrange it and propose another solution.

JUNE 11 - 23, 1862

* ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
: GEN "Bobby" Lee (~88,000)

* * RIGHT WING (ARMY OF THE PENINSULA) : MG "Prince John" Magruder (~25,500)

* * * D. R. Jones' Division : MG "Neighbor" Jones (~11,500)
* * * * * Ripley's Brigade : 6/23/27/28/44/48 GA (~3,000)
* * * * * Toombs' Brigade : 2/10/15/17/20/53 GA (~3,000)
* * * * * Cobb's Brigade : 3/4/16/22/24 GA + Cobb's (GA) Legion (~3,000)
* * * * * Wright's Brigade : 1/7/8/9/11 GA + 2 GA Battalion (~2,500)
* * * * * Division Artillery Battalion : 8 Batteries (32 guns)

* * * McLaws' Division : MG Lafayette McLaws (~14,000)
* * * * * Kershaw's Brigade : 2/3/5/6/7/8 SC + 4 SC Battalion (~3,000)
* * * * * Semmes' Brigade : 1/2/5/10/14 LA + 1 LA Zouaves Battalion + 3 LA Battalion (~3,500)
* * * * * Griffith's Brigade : 12/13/17/18/19/21 MS + 2 MS Battalion (~4,000)
* * * * * Featherston's Brigade : 1/7/14 TN + 2/11 MS + 2 FL (~3,500)
* * * * * Division Artillery Battalion : 10 Batteries (38 guns)

* * CENTER WING (ARMY OF THE POTOMAC) : MG "Pete" Longstreet (~25,000)

* * * A. P. Hill's Light Division : MG A. P. Hill (~12,500)
* * * * * J. R. Anderson's Brigade : 14/18/19/35/45/49 GA (~3,000)
* * * * * Branch's Brigade : 6/7/18/28/33/37 NC (~3,000)
* * * * * Pender's Brigade : 15/16/22/34/38 NC (~3,000)
* * * * * Gregg's Brigade : 1/12/13/14 SC + 1/2 SC Rifles (~3,500)
* * * * * Division Artillery Battalion : 12 Batteries (51 guns)

* * * Anderson's Division : BG "Fighting Dick" Anderson (~12,500)
* * * * * Archer's Brigade : 1/3/7/11/17/24 VA (~2,500)
* * * * * Pickett's Brigade : 8/18/19/28/56 VA + 22 VA Battalion (~3,000)
* * * * * Wilcox's Brigade : 8/9/10/11/13/14 AL (~3,500)
* * * * * Texas (Hood's) Brigade : 1/4/5 TX + 3 AK + 2 AK Battalion + Hampton's (SC) Legion + Palmetto (SC) Sharpshooters (~3,500)
* * * * * Division Artillery Battalion : 10 Batteries (41 guns)

* * LEFT WING (ARMY OF THE VALLEY) : MG "Stonewall" Jackson (~23,500)

* * * Ewell's Division (consolidated) : MG "Baldy" Ewell (~14,500)
* * * * * Stonewall (Winder's) Brigade : 2/4/5/27/33 VA + 1 VA Battalion (~1,500)
* * * * * J. R. Jones' Brigade : 10/21/23/37/42/48 VA (~3,000)
* * * * * Elzey's Brigade : 13/25/31/44/52/58 VA (~1,500)
* * * * * Lawton's Brigade : 13/26/31/38/60/61 GA (~4,000)
* * * * * Taylor's Brigade : 6/7/8/9 LA + 1 LA Special Battalion + 16 MS (~2,500)
* * * * * Trimble's Brigade : 12/21 GA + 21 NC + 1 NC Sharpshooters + 15 AL + 1 MD (~2,000)
* * * * * Division Artillery Battalion : 7 Batteries (32 guns)

* * * D. H. Hill's Division (attached) : MG D. H. Hill (~9,000)
* * * * * Garland's Brigade : 2/12/13/20/23 NC (~2,500)
* * * * * G. B. Anderson's Brigade : 1/2/3/4/14/30 NC (~3,500)
* * * * * Rodes' Brigade : 3/5/6/12/13/26 AL + 5 AL Battalion (~3,000)
* * * * * Division Artillery Battalion : 7 Batteries (30 guns)

* * RESERVE WING (DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA) : MG "Granny" Holmes (~14,000)

* * * Huger's Division : MG Benjamin Huger (~6,500)
* * * * * Ransom's Brigade : 24/25/26/35/48/49 NC (~4,000)
* * * * * Walker's Brigade : 27/43/45/46/50 NC (~2,500)
* * * * * Division Artillery Battalion : 9 Batteries (46 guns)

* * * Whiting's Division : BG "Billy" Whiting (~7,500)
* * * * * Field's Brigade : 15/32/40/47/55/60 VA (~2,500)
* * * * * Mahone's Brigade : 6/12/16/30/41/49 VA (~3,000)
* * * * * Armistead's Brigade : 9/14/38/53/57 VA + 5 VA Battalion (~2,000)
* * * * * Division Artillery Battalion : 7 Batteries (28 guns)


EXPLANATIONS :
* Lee divides his army into four wings, three in action and one at reserve. These wings are commanded by the highest officers in the area : MG Theophilus H. Holmes, MG John B. Magruder, MG James Longstreet and MG Thomas J. Jackson. Each of this officers had control of divisions, which can be detached to other commanders temporarily (D. H. Hill's Division, for example, originally belonging to Longstreet's wing, is sent here to the Valley in order to link with Jackson and to get Lawton's Brigade from Ewell's Division).

* The divisions are commanded by senior officers :
- MGs Benjamin Huger, D. R. Jones, Richard S. Ewell, D. H. Hill, Lafayette McLaws, A. P. Hill
- BGs R. H. Anderson and W. H. C. Whiting
These commanders are in charge of two (Huger) to six (Ewell) brigades, ranging from 6,500 to 14,500 men.

* By consolidating the brigades to five or six regiments each, I want to provide a more centralized command structure with as less subordinate as possible. At the Seven Days, Lee was indeed communicating his orders to seven different commanders at least, sometimes with seniority problems.

* Holmes is the oldest subordinate on the field and, while his skills are respected by President Davis, he didn't prove to be a dependable commander throughout the war. I assigned him to the Reserve Wing in command of the two smallest divisions of the Army, as an extra-force in case of general engagement.

* Magruder is a deceptive master when entrenched and is a faithful warrior, following clear orders. He needs to prove his ability in attack, while commanding a large amount of men. Both D. R. Jones and McLaws, his subordinates, are competent officers.

* Longstreet is an excellent tactician, he commands the main body of the army. MG A. P. Hill is a tough and charismatic leader but can be a "difficult" subordinate for Longstreet. Manwhile, Longstreet could trust BG R. H. Anderson, nicknamed "Fighting Dick", who succeeds in command of Longstreet's old division.

* Jackson is a legend but his Valley campaign costed him both physical and mental strengthes. That's why all of his command was gathered in Ewell's Division as a lone unit, able to act as top subordinate and respond to Lee's orders if Jackson cannot be ready to attack. In this case, D. H. Hill's Division would return to Longstreet's wing, getting Lawton's Brigade from the Valley District. Ewell follows clear orders and is a superb tactician. D. H. Hill is a very talented commander but often get troubles with his superiors (except for Jackson, his brother-in-law).

* Facing the Army of the Potomac with such an organization, GEN Lee should be able to put more effectively in action his troops and could be able to destroy a part of the Fifth Corps (if not the totality), while threatening McClellan's supply base and escape road to Harrison's Landing.

* Of course, we would never know but this can be interesting to imagine what would happen :

BATTLES :
June 25 :
* McClellan orders Heintzelman to make a demonstration with some elements of the Third Corps. Holmes' Command, entrenched at Oak Grove, repulses the attack and counter-attacks with Huger's Division : minimal losses on both sides.

June 26 :
* Longstreet is assigned to attack Fitz-John Porter's Fifth Corps at Mechanicsville. Jackson is ordered to move first by the North but he doesn't attack and Longstreet launches A. P. Hill's Light Division against entrenched Federals and is savagely repulsed. Realizing that Jackson is no more operational to achieve his mission, Lee orders directly to Ewell to attack with all his forces in order to divert Porter while D. H. Hill's Division, reeinforced by the adjunction of Lawton's Brigade, reaches Longstreet's wing. The Fifth Corps resists desperately against the 10,500 men from Ewell's Division and Porter asks McClellan reinforcements from the other federal corps, south of the Chickahominy River. To prevent this, Lee has ordered to Magruder to demonstrate against the Federals in this area, and McClellan receives reports from Sumner, Heintzelman, Keyes and Franklin telling that the ennemy is preparing an attack in force.

* McClellan, convinced that Lee outnumbers him, orders Porter to resist until dusk and to fall back then, while the Sixth Corps would link with Porter's troops and the whole army would proceed to retreat down to Harrison's Landing. Finally, Lee lauch a general attack with A. P. Hill's, D. H. Hill's and Anderson's divisions against Porter, more than 35,000 Confederates against 20,000 Federals without support, nearly out of ammunition. Porter decides to make a stand and the Fifth Corps is finally annihilated by a flank attack lauched by Ewell, acting as semi-independent commander on the back of his ennemy. With some 6,000 men, Ewell manages to cut the link between Porter and McClellan and surrounds the Fifth Corps.

* At night, Lee occupies Mechanicsville with Longstreet's wing. Having destroyed the whole Fifth Corps (25,000 men strong) and having lost less than 10,000 men, he won the day. Lee expected McClellan's reaction and prepares to pursuit with Magruder and Longstreet, south of the river, and with Ewell and D. H. Hill, on the north side. Huger's Division from Holmes' wing is escorting the Federal prisoners while Whiting's Division is temporarily attached to Longstreet' wing.

June 27 :
* McClellan urges the Fourth Corps towards Harrison's Landing while the remaining corps extend in defensive line aroud Glendale, expecting an attack.

June 28 :
* Lee, advised by Longstreet, seeks to avoid another costly assault, and tries to uncircle the Army of the Potomac by the north. Ewell crosses the river at White Oak Swamp and moves beyond the federal lines, followed by D. H. Hill. He is ordered to go south and cut the link between the Fourth Corps and the rest of the federal troops. D. H. Hill's Division encounters Franklin's Sixth Corps and a savage fight occurs. The Confederates, blocked in the swamp, are bloodily repulsed but Franklin doesn't counter-attack, fearing a trap. Ewell reaches Keyes' rearguard and begin to entrench between the two parts of the Union army.

* Having learned of D. H. Hill's defeat against Franklin, Ewell urges desperately Lee for help. Longstreet, supported by Magruder, proposes Lee to send Magruder' wing to Malvern Hill in order to get ground advantage to lauch a major assault. Lee agrees and Whiting's Division, temporarily attached, starts moving fast to Malvern Hill, while Longstreet is assigned to a deceiving task to prevent any federal movement in this area. D. H. Hill, unable to reach Ewell's position, is ordered by Lee to act as Longstreet, mounting false attacks from the north in order to maintain pressure on McClellan and to prevent the destruction of Ewell's Division.

June 29 :
* Whiting's Division, as the vanguard of Magruder's wing, reaches Malvern Hill at dawn but encounters stiffen resistance from Hooker's Division (3rd Corps), who had been ordered by McClellan to establish a new line of defense on top of the hill. The Federals successfully repulse Whiting's assault but are soon outnumbered by the rest of Magruder's wing. McClellan, having loss ground, orders Franklin, Heintzelman and Sumner to gather their divisions and prepare retreating in hurry. While Heintzelman leads the way to join Keyes at Harrison's Landing, Sumner and Franklin are supposed to maintain a defensive line against the Confederates. Magruder starts to rally more and more men at Malvern Hill and launch his troops on afternoon against Sedgwick's Division (2nd Corps) and Kearny's Division (3rd Corps). TheFederals stand bravely and inflict high casualties to their attackers but are forced to fall back at Frayser's Farm. Hooker's Division is separated from the main body of the army and is soon joined by Richardson's Division (2nd Corps), led by McClellan himself, trying to maintain the escape road open until nightfall.

June 30
* Lee, despite Longstreet's advise to wait, orders a general attack on every lines. The Federals are uncircled with few hope of escape. After a desperate resistance, many union soldiers begin to surrender and Sumner's line, in front of Longstreet's wing collapses, allowing the Confederate to split the Army of the Potomac and strike on the rear of Franklin, who was dealing with D. H. Hill at White Oak Swamp. The remnants of Hooker's and Richardson's Brigade, under McClellan direct command, leave the battlefield. Sumner, trying to rally the troops, is killed. Heintzelman is surrounded with Kearny's Division by Magruder's wing, forcing him to surrender. Franklin tries to escape with W. F. Smith's Division but is blocked by D. H. Hill advance and is soon reached by A. P. Hill's Light Division.

* Lee wants to pursue McClellan but his troops are exhausted by these fighting week. Finally, Magruder forms a task force, leading D. H. Hill's and Whiting's Divisions in order to join Ewell and to destroy the rest of the Army of the Potomac.

* McClellan conducts his two small divisions of 10,000 men towards Harrison's Landing and reach Ewell's position on the way. Ewell, having no idea of the size of this federal force, prepares for defense. McClellan, believing that Ewell is about to attack him, goes east and makes a detour to finally link with Keyes at Harrison's Landing, gathering a force of 25,000 men. D. H. Hill, leading the pursuit, blames Ewell for his inaction and continues his way south but realizes that the Federals are well entrenched and too numerous for him. He fall back to Ewell and afterwards, the main body of the army regroup with them.


CONCLUSION :
* With this command structure, and assuming that generals are acting like they originally acted in history, we can imagine that Lee's battleplan would have worked with more efficiency (not perfectly though) : I can at least count 15,000 to 20,000 casualties for the ANV. For the Army of the Potomac, this is a disaster, with the loss of nearly four of the five corps (perhaps 50,000 to 65,000 men killed, wounded or captured).
 
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Where did the other 24,000 men PFD go? Some of them are presumably in the Richmond garrison, but the rest?

Indeed some of them are in the Richmond garrison (approximately half of them, 10,000 to 12,000 men).
For the lacking numbers, I do not count the artillery crew (very numerous) neither Wise's command (left in Richmond because I didn't know how to use it), nor cavalry units (~4,000 under Stuart).
I did also made a global number for each brigade, which doesn't count hundreds of soldiers (for example, instead of 3,238, I wrote 3,000).

That's why 24,000 PFD are missing, I only dealt with first-line infantry. Nevertheless, 88,000 are much of a challenge for the Army of the Potomac at the same time (maybe I would make another thread this time on Union side).
 

Saphroneth

Captain
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
June 26 :
* Longstreet is assigned to attack Fitz-John Porter's Fifth Corps at Mechanicsville. Jackson is ordered to move first by the North but he doesn't attack and Longstreet launches A. P. Hill's Light Division against entrenched Federals and is savagely repulsed. Realizing that Jackson is no more operational to achieve his mission, Lee orders directly to Ewell to attack with all his forces in order to divert Porter while D. H. Hill's Division, reeinforced by the adjunction of Lawton's Brigade, reaches Longstreet's wing. The Fifth Corps resists desperately against the 10,500 men from Ewell's Division and Porter asks McClellan reinforcements from the other federal corps, south of the Chickahominy River. To prevent this, Lee has ordered to Magruder to demonstrate against the Federals in this area, and McClellan receives reports from Sumner, Heintzelman, Keyes and Franklin telling that the ennemy is preparing an attack in force.

* McClellan, convinced that Lee outnumbers him, orders Porter to resist until dusk and to fall back then, while the Sixth Corps would link with Porter's troops and the whole army would proceed to retreat down to Harrison's Landing. Finally, Lee lauch a general attack with A. P. Hill's, D. H. Hill's and Anderson's divisions against Porter, more than 35,000 Confederates against 20,000 Federals without support, nearly out of ammunition. Porter decides to make a stand and the Fifth Corps is finally annihilated by a flank attack lauched by Ewell, acting as semi-independent commander on the back of his ennemy. With some 6,000 men, Ewell manages to cut the link between Porter and McClellan and surrounds the Fifth Corps.

* At night, Lee occupies Mechanicsville with Longstreet's wing. Having destroyed the whole Fifth Corps (25,000 men strong) and having lost less than 10,000 men, he won the day. Lee expected McClellan's reaction and prepares to pursuit with Magruder and Longstreet, south of the river, and with Ewell and D. H. Hill, on the north side. Huger's Division from Holmes' wing is escorting the Federal prisoners while Whiting's Division is temporarily attached to Longstreet' wing.
So having a look at this, I'm not really sure that this works.
Specifically what you have for the Valley army is that you're sending out DH Hill instead of Whiting to reinforce Jackson, but you haven't actually changed that Jackson is in command of the army coming down from the Valley; either Jackson is close enough to attack on the 26th or he isn't, and what triggered McClellan to have Porter pull back to the prepared works at Gaines Mill was Jackson being close enough to turn the Beaver Dam Creek position.

Essentially I don't see a reason why this doesn't just move the withdrawal from the Beaver Dam Creek position up by some hours.

As for McClellan sending reinforcements, McClellan sent a lot of reinforcements over the Chickahominy historically (on the 27th). He asked his commanders what they thought they could spare (which is historical) but delayed sending troops a bit because Porter thought he had things under control (which isn't the case here); when he realized Porter did need reinforcements McClellan actually pulled a bit more than his south-of-the-river corps commanders said they could spare. Here Porter would get reinforced earlier.
Porter in the Gaines Mill position was able to resist attacks by the entire attacking column north of the Chickahominy (ca. 60,000 Confederate troops) for most of the 27th and finally broke at sundown. Here you've got only a little more than half that strength.
 

Saphroneth

Captain
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Indeed some of them are in the Richmond garrison (approximately half of them, 10,000 to 12,000 men).
For the lacking numbers, I do not count the artillery crew (very numerous) neither Wise's command (left in Richmond because I didn't know how to use it), nor cavalry units (~4,000 under Stuart).
I did also made a global number for each brigade, which doesn't count hundreds of soldiers (for example, instead of 3,238, I wrote 3,000).

That's why 24,000 PFD are missing, I only dealt with first-line infantry. Nevertheless, 88,000 are much of a challenge for the Army of the Potomac at the same time (maybe I would make another thread this time on Union side).
That's actually very problematic if you're flooring the numbers per brigade. On average that cuts down 500 men per brigade!

One would think that since we have the numbers in Confederate Tide Rising appendix 2C you may as well use them.
 
Joined
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So having a look at this, I'm not really sure that this works.
Specifically what you have for the Valley army is that you're sending out DH Hill instead of Whiting to reinforce Jackson, but you haven't actually changed that Jackson is in command of the army coming down from the Valley; either Jackson is close enough to attack on the 26th or he isn't, and what triggered McClellan to have Porter pull back to the prepared works at Gaines Mill was Jackson being close enough to turn the Beaver Dam Creek position.

Essentially I don't see a reason why this doesn't just move the withdrawal from the Beaver Dam Creek position up by some hours.

As for McClellan sending reinforcements, McClellan sent a lot of reinforcements over the Chickahominy historically (on the 27th). He asked his commanders what they thought they could spare (which is historical) but delayed sending troops a bit because Porter thought he had things under control (which isn't the case here); when he realized Porter did need reinforcements McClellan actually pulled a bit more than his south-of-the-river corps commanders said they could spare. Here Porter would get reinforced earlier.
Porter in the Gaines Mill position was able to resist attacks by the entire attacking column north of the Chickahominy (ca. 60,000 Confederate troops) for most of the 27th and finally broke at sundown. Here you've got only a little more than half that strength.

I didn't go into details, that's true, sorry about that. I just started to make an order of battle and then I tried to get some fun while writing down an alternate scenario for the Seven Days Battles. This isn't historically correct but this is what I believe realistic. Of course, for the Mechanicsville part, I altered greatly the combat value of the 5th Corps in order to highlight what I thought was efficient as a military structure. Because A. P. Hill is under Longstreet's command, the first assault isn't as bad as the one decided by A. P. Hill alone in history.

For D. H. Hill sent to the Valley, I had indeed some problems with the dates and the location of units, I considered that Jackson was coming from the north-side of the Chickahominy and that D. H. Hill was linking at the river, allowing Lee to get contact with all of his top commanders and allowing him to communicate swiftly with them. That's why I do not consider that the Mechanicsville part of my story isn't a repetition of the historical battle because Ewell is appointed as temporary commander of the Army of the Valley while Jackson is sent resting at the rear. Ewell, being told by Lee to attack with all his forces, maintains pressure on Porter and suffers heavily (I noted 10,500 for June 26 and then 6,000 for the rest of the campaign). This allows Longstreet to regroup his two divisions. Magruder, having more men than he had actually, could demonstrate with more efficiency.

When I wrote it, in my mind, I first tried to make say Lee that, if McClellan transfers troops from the south to the north, Magruder should attack, with the help of Whiting's Division with Longstreet as reeinforcement. But in my story, I didn't explained that, nor did I let this happened and Magruder just keep busy nearly 65,000 men with approximately 33,000 men (his wing + Whiting's Division attached), more than his historically 17,000 men at the same time. Here, the threat is more perceptive for the Union, moreover Magruder controls the whole line in front of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 6th Corps, allowing him to organize deceiving moves on a large scale. For me, this prevents McClellan to move any unit from the area and leads him to let his friend Porter resist and retreat alone (that's quite sad because Porter is one of my favorite officer, but this is not the subject of this thread).

Numerically, Magruder's wing (with Whiting's Division) is equal to two union corps (Fifth Corps excepted). Longstreet's wing with D. H. Hill's Division is about 38,000 men against nearly 23,000 men for Porter, with Ewell threatening on the northern side with 10,500 more (48,500 men on a vast attacking line against 23,000 entrenched men almost half-circled).

Throughout the campaign, Confederate forces gathered against the four remaining corps were as followed :
- Magruder's wing = 25,500 men + Whiting's Division (7,500 more) = 33,000 fresh troops
- Longstreet's wing = more or less 20,000 men after the losses at Mechanicsville
- Ewell's Division = more or less 6,000 men after the losses at Mechanicsville (not engaged after Mechanicsville)
- D. H. Hill's Division = more or less 10,000 men after the losses at Mechanicsville
TOTAL = 63,000 men + 6,000 from Ewell's Division

The four union corps represents approximately 60,000 to 65,000 at their most but are greatly dispirited by the destruction of the 5th Corps and are unaware of Lee's objectives. Most of all, the 4th Corps is sent to Harrison's Landing, preventing the use of some 12,000 men for McClellan at Glendale and Frayser's Farm. By splitting his army to outflank McClellan, Lee is Lee for the most of the battle in my point of view, even if I realize now that my low estimate numbers make it appear strange and a bit nonsense :
- 3rd Corps (Hooker's and Kearny's Division) and 2nd Corps (Sedgwick's and Richardson's Divisions) = 32,000 men.
- 6th Corps (Slocum's and W. F. Smith's Divisions) = 16,000 men
TOTAL = 48,000 men (15,000 men less than their opponents, while outflanking).

If McClellan had kept the 4th Corps with him, we can imagine that a perfect union defense against a confederate general assault would avoid the destruction of the Army of the Potomac (60,000 men against 69,000 men, barely equally sized armies). Morale has got a lot to do with the result of the battle and the loss of the 5th Corps would have been mourned by many.

Thanks for noticing the problems ! More to come and to discuss !
 

Saphroneth

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Feb 18, 2017
For D. H. Hill sent to the Valley, I had indeed some problems with the dates and the location of units, I considered that Jackson was coming from the north-side of the Chickahominy and that D. H. Hill was linking at the river, allowing Lee to get contact with all of his top commanders and allowing him to communicate swiftly with them. That's why I do not consider that the Mechanicsville part of my story isn't a repetition of the historical battle because Ewell is appointed as temporary commander of the Army of the Valley while Jackson is sent resting at the rear. Ewell, being told by Lee to attack with all his forces, maintains pressure on Porter and suffers heavily (I noted 10,500 for June 26 and then 6,000 for the rest of the campaign). This allows Longstreet to regroup his two divisions. Magruder, having more men than he had actually, could demonstrate with more efficiency.
Few problems there.

The first is that who's in command of the Confederate side either means that the divisions under Jackson march faster or it means they do not.
If they don't march faster, they don't arrive in time to fight; if they do march faster, that is what will trigger Porter's retreat. Porter didn't fall back because of the date, he fell back because of the Confederate force turning his position, and if the Confederate force turning his position arrives earlier it has to be considered that Porter will fall back earlier as well.


The second is the point about Magruder having more men. Historically Magruder (with the forces south of the Chickahominy) had a total of 43,000 men under his command all told; here he's got 25,500 (and as such has 18,000 fewer men).
Even with Whiting included he has 11,000 men fewer than historically. Meanwhile the attacking column north of the Chickahominy here has 25,000 with Longstreet (instead of 45,000) and 23,500 with Jackson (while historically Jackson had 22,000) for a total attacking force north of the Chickahominy of 48,500 instead of 67,000.

In other words here you have Confederate attacks doing better than historically with about 75% of the troops they had historically.
 

rbasin

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Jan 31, 2013
Location
Tampa, Fl
Couldn't some of the issues come from Lee himself? Inexperienced staff, shaking out commands, etc?
 

Saphroneth

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Feb 18, 2017
Couldn't some of the issues come from Lee himself? Inexperienced staff, shaking out commands, etc?
I think this is worth considering, yes. Lee's staff was tiny (it's broken out separately in some records, it's single-digit including him) and effectively his first jump into army command was moving over 100,000 men around.

We know he was okay with a three-corps command in 1863 and later, and we know he was okay with a two-corps command in November 1862-May 1863 (and in August 1862), but there were errors and SNAFUs and stuff when he was commanding a larger number of distinct units on the Peninsula and in Maryland.
 

rbasin

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Jan 31, 2013
Location
Tampa, Fl
I think this is worth considering, yes. Lee's staff was tiny (it's broken out separately in some records, it's single-digit including him) and effectively his first jump into army command was moving over 100,000 men around.

We know he was okay with a three-corps command in 1863 and later, and we know he was okay with a two-corps command in November 1862-May 1863 (and in August 1862), but there were errors and SNAFUs and stuff when he was commanding a larger number of distinct units on the Peninsula and in Maryland.

Not to mention the vastly different personalities involved? Was he helped at all by the so-so job of McClellan's corps Commanders?
 

Saphroneth

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Feb 18, 2017
Not to mention the vastly different personalities involved? Was he helped at all by the so-so job of McClellan's corps Commanders?
Tricky. There are a couple of cases where it can be argued that McClellan's corps commanders in the Seven Days make screwups that did affect the outcome, and a few cases where they nearly did.

Porter being too confident during the Gaines Mill sequence may have delayed him getting reinforcements that might have let him hold north of the Chickahominy, though AFAICT the operational situation as of midday on the 27th meant that McClellan would have to shift south anyway.
Franklin quitting his position without orders on the night of the 30th was what led to the retreat from Glendale to Malvern (and thus to Harrisons) because it unzipped what had been a solid line McClellan was planning to hold long-term.
Sumner refusing to leave the field on the 28th-29th despite how the army plan was to pull back and he was about to be isolated could have resulted in the loss of his corps.
I'm unaware offhand of any serious mistake made by Heintzelman, and IIRC Keyes was effectively sidelined by McClellan anyway by making a wing of 2nd and 4th Corps (so Sumner was over him). Keyes OTOH may have been the one who convinced Halleck that the AotP couldn't productively stay on the Peninsula, but that's ranging a bit wide from the topic of discussion.

I think it can be argued that a properly-functioning set of corps commanders for the Union (all else being equal) would have led to the casualty ratio being much more in the Union's favour (as a big chunk of the Union losses resulted from the defeat at Gaines Mill, both directly and indirectly) and a Union line in place in the Glendale position (Malvern Hill as the left flank bastion and the right resting at the mouth of the White Oak).
 
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
New try, having studied more about the Seven Days battles in order to bring more realism to the ANV organization and the resulting fights around the Chickahominy River.
I understood that McClellan wasn't as bad as I thought (he was actually quite good in a fall-back operation and prevented the loss of Porter's Fifth Corps at Gaines Mill with the transfer of Slocum's Division, even if it wasn't enough to counter the confederate assault), I discovered that Franklin bore a great responsabilty in the decision to retreat to Harrison's Landing and I found myself quite astonished to see how weak was my knowledge of this campaign.
Having read some articles and biographies and using orders of battles edited on the web (from Brett Schulte's website), I've decided to propose another order of battle for the ANV. As usual, I used only infantry units in my organization :

ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA (92,221)


1) MAGRUDER'S COMMAND (29,724)

*McLaws' Division (11,695)
- Semmes' Brigade (2,778)
- - - 1st Louisiana Regiment (541)
- - - 2nd Louisiana Regiment (581)
- - - 5th Louisiana Regiment (661)
- - - 10th Louisiana Regiment (595)
- - - 3rd Louisiana Battalion (400)

- Featherston's Brigade (2,997)
- - - 2nd Mississippi Regiment (608)
- - - 11th Mississippi Regiment (623)
- - - 12th Mississippi Regiment (457)
- - - 16th Mississippi Regiment (599)
- - - 19th Mississippi Regiment (710)

- Griffith's Brigade (3,130)
- - - 13th Mississippi Regiment (640)
- - - 17th Mississippi Regiment (692)
- - - 18th Mississippi Regiment (684)
- - - 21st Mississippi Regiment (792)
- - - 2nd Mississippi Battalion (322)
- Kershaw's Brigade (2,790)
- - - 2nd South Carolina Regiment (616)
- - - 3rd South Carolina Regiment (550)
- - - 7th South Carolina Regiment (581)
- - - 8th South Carolina Regiment (467)
- - - Hampton's (South Carolina) Legion (576)

*D. R. Jones' Division (10,182)

- G. T. Anderson's (D. R. Jones') Brigade (2,477)
- - - 7th Georgia Regiment (611)
- - - 8th Georgia Regiment (251)
- - - 9th Georgia Regiment (411)
- - - 11th Georgia Regiment (573)
- - - 18th Georgia Regiment (631)

- Cobb's Brigade (2,628)
- - - 10th Georgia Regiment (579)
- - - 16th Georgia Regiment (650)
- - - 24th Georgia Regiment (584)
- - - 35th Georgia Regiment (445)
- - - 53rd Georgia Regiment (600)
- - - Cobb's (Georgia) Regiment (300)

- Toombs' Brigade (2,373)
- - - 1st Georgia Regiment (367)
- - - 2nd Georgia Regiment (607)
- - - 15th Georgia Regiment (441)
- - - 17th Georgia Regiment (398)
- - - 20th Georgia Regiment (560)

- Wright's Brigade (2,704)
- - - 3rd Georgia Regiment (454)
- - - 4th Georgia Regiment (557)
- - - 22nd Georgia Regiment (353)
- - - 38th Georgia Regiment (1,040)
- - - 2nd Georgia Battalion (300)


*Whiting's Division (7,847)
- Hood's Brigade (2,372)
- - - 3rd Arkansas Regiment (504)
- - - 2nd Arkansas Battalion (106)
- - - 1st Texas Regiment (614)
- - - 4th Texas Regiment (616)
- - - 5th Texas Regiment (532)
- Branch's Brigade (2,582)
- - - 7th North Carolina Regiment (624)
- - - 18th North Carolina Regiment (418)
- - - 28th North Carolina Regiment (682)
- - - 33rd North Carolina Regiment (353)
- - - 37th North Carolina Regiment (505)
- Law's (Whiting's) Brigade (1,619)
- - - 3rd Alabama Regiment (610)
- - - 4th Alabama Regiment (462)
- - - 15th Alabama Regiment (547)
- - - Regiments joining Law's Brigade during the fight (1,274)
- - - - - - 44th Alabama Regiment (462)
- - - - - - 47th Alabama Regiment (433)
- - - - - - 48th Alabama Regiment (379)

2) HOLMES' COMMAND (7,371)


*Huger's Division (7,371)
- Armistead's Brigade (2,088)
- - - 9th Virginia Regiment (296)
- - - 14th Virginia Regiment (380)
- - - 38th Virginia Regiment (322)
- - - 53rd Virginia Regiment (273)
- - - 57th Virginia Regiment (684)
- - - 5th Virginia Battalion (133)
- Mahone's Brigade (2,785)
- - - 6th Virginia Regiment (570)
- - - 12th Virginia Regiment (666)
- - - 15th Virginia Regiment (476)
- - - 16th Virginia Regiment (461)
- - - 32nd Virginia Regiment (201)
- - - 41st Virginia Regiment (411)

- Wise's Brigade (2,498)
- - - 26th Virginia Regiment (460)
- - - 30th Virginia Regiment (610)
- - - 46th Virginia Regiment (412)
- - - 56th Virginia Regiment (466)
- - - 60th Virginia Regiment (550)


3) JACKSON'S COMMAND (24,482)

*Ewell's Division (11,358)
- Winder's (Stonewall) Brigade (1,597)
- - - 2nd Virginia Regiment (289)
- - - 4th Virginia Regiment (373)
- - - 5th Virginia Regiment (405)
- - - 27th Virginia Regiment (193)
- - - 33rd Virginia Regiment (337)
- Fulkerson's (Taliaferro's) Brigade (2,433)
- - - 10th Virginia Regiment (426)
- - - 21st Virginia Regiment (289)
- - - 23rd Virginia Regiment (331)
- - - 37th Virginia Regiment (406)
- - - 42nd Virginia Regiment (430)
- - - 48th Virginia Regiment (373)
- - - 1st Virginia Battalion (178)
- Elzey's Brigade (1,871)
- - - 1st Maryland Regiment (325)
- - - 13th Virginia Regiment (323)
- - - 25th Virginia Regiment (271)
- - - 31st Virginia Regiment (262)
- - - 44th Virginia Regiment (133)
- - - 52nd Virginia Regiment (277)
- - - 58th Virginia Regiment (280)
- Taylor's Brigade (2,748)
- - - 6th Louisiana Regiment (484)
- - - 7th Louisiana Regiment (368)
- - - 8th Louisiana Regiment (506)
- - - 9th Louisiana Regiment (399)

- - - 14th Louisiana Regiment (623)
- - - 1st Louisiana Zouaves Battalion (212)

- - - 1st Louisiana Special Battalion (156)
- Trimble's Brigade (2,709)
- - - 12th North Carolina Regiment (557)
- - - 15th North Carolina Regiment (479)
- - - 21st North Carolina Regiment (329)
- - - 27th North Carolina Regiment (642)
- - - 35th North Carolina Regiment (620)
- - - 1st North Carolina Sharpshooters Battalion (82)


*A. P. Hill's Light Division (13,124)
- Kemper's Brigade (2,030)
- - - 1st Virginia Regiment (177)
- - - 7th Virginia Regiment (400)
- - - 11th Virginia Regiment (508)
- - - 17th Virginia Regiment (431)
- - - 24th Virginia Regiment (514)
- Field's Brigade (2,275)
- - - 40th Virginia Regiment (581)
- - - 47th Virginia Regiment (446)
- - - 49th Virginia Regiment (337)
- - - 55th Virginia Regiment (533)
- - - 22nd Virginia Battalion (378)
- Pickett's Brigade (2,658)
- - - 3rd Virginia Regiment (599)
- - - 8th Virginia Regiment (359)
- - - 18th Virginia Regiment (517)
- - - 19th Virginia Regiment (516)
- - - 28th Virginia Regiment (667)
- Lawton's Brigade (3,336)
- - - 13th Georgia Regiment (795)
- - - 26th Georgia Regiment (534)
- - - 31st Georgia Regiment (657)
- - - 60th Georgia Regiment (650)
- - - 61st Georgia Regiment (700)
- J. R. Anderson's Brigade (2,825)
- - - 12th Georgia Regiment (298)
- - - 21st Georgia Regiment (424)
- - - 14th Georgia Regiment (294)
- - - 19th Georgia Regiment (319)
- - - 45th Georgia Regiment (550)
- - - 49th Georgia Regiment (940)


4) LONGSTREET'S COMMAND (30,644)

*D. H. Hill's Division (10,900)
- Rodes' Brigade (2,373)
- - - 5th Alabama Regiment (450)
- - - 6th Alabama Regiment (732)
- - - 12th Alabama Regiment (342)
- - - 13th Alabama Regiment (406)
- - - 26th Alabama Regiment (243)
- - - 5th Alabama Battalion (200)
- G. B. Anderson's Brigade (2,804)
- - - 2nd North Carolina Regiment (589)
- - - 4th North Carolina Regiment (370)
- - - 13th North Carolina Regiment (510)
- - - 14th North Carolina Regiment (625)
- - - 30th North Carolina Regiment (710)
- Garland's Brigade (2,745)
- - - 1st North Carolina Regiment (590)
- - - 3rd North Carolina Regiment (637)
- - - 5th North Carolina Regiment (366)
- - - 20th North Carolina Regiment (781)
- - - 23rd North Carolina Regiment (371)
- Colquitt's (Rains') Brigade (2,978)
- - - 6th Georgia Regiment (603)
- - - 23rd Georgia Regiment (317)
- - - 27th Georgia Regiment (274)
- - - 28th Georgia Regiment (399)

- - - 44th Georgia Regiment (576)
- - - 48th Georgia Regiment (809)


*Longstreet's Division (10,794)
- Jenkins' (R. H. Anderson's) Brigade (2,796)

- - - 1st South Carolina Rifles (600)
- - - 2nd South Carolina Rifles (610)
- - - 5th South Carolina Regiment (427)
- - - 6th South Carolina Regiment (416)
- - - Palmetto (South Carolina) Sharpshooters Regiment (743)
- Wilcox's Brigade (3,066)
- - - 8th Alabama Regiment (750)
- - - 9th Alabama Regiment (520)
- - - 10th Alabama Regiment (520)
- - - 11th Alabama Regiment (626)
- - - 14th Alabama Regiment (650)

- Gregg's Brigade (2,650)
- - - 1st South Carolina Regiment (600)
- - - 12th South Carolina Regiment (600)
- - - 13th South Carolina Regiment (600)
- - - 14th South Carolina Regiment (600)
- - - 4th South Carolina Battalion (250)

- Archer's Brigade (2,282)
- - - 2nd Florida Regiment (587)
- - - 1st Tennessee Regiment (565)
- - - 7th Tennessee Regiment (565)
- - - 14th Tennessee Regiment (565)


*J. G. Walker's Division (8,950)
- Ransom's Brigade (3,580)
- - - 24th North Carolina Regiment (706)
- - - 25th North Carolina Regiment (989)
- - - 26th North Carolina Regiment (755)
- - - 48th North Carolina Regiment (557)
- - - 49th North Carolina Regiment (573)
- Daniel's Brigade (2,229)
- - - 43rd North Carolina Regiment (613)
- - - 45th North Carolina Regiment (575)
- - - 46th North Carolina Regiment (565)
- - - 50th North Carolina Regiment (476)
- Pender's Brigade (3,141)
- - - 6th North Carolina Regiment (625)
- - - 16th North Carolina Regiment (696)
- - - 22nd North Carolina Regiment (658)
- - - 34th North Carolina Regiment (688)
- - - 38th North Carolina Regiment (474)

The Army of Northern Virginia is divided into four commands :
- the Left Wing, or Jackson's Command (coming from the Shenandoah, formerly the Army of the Valley).
- the Center Wing, or Longtstreet's Command (the main force, formerly the Army of the Potomac).
- the Right Wing, or Magruder's Command (formerly the Army of Peninsula).
- the Reserve Wing, or Holmes' Command (formerly the Department of Norfolk).

The Left Wing, under Major-General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, contains two heavy divisions :
- the first one led by Major-General Richard S. Ewell, it is composed of the remnants of Jackson's division and Ewell's old division, consolidated into a single command of five brigades after the Shenandoah Campaign casualties (three Virginia, one Louisiana, one North Carolina). Some units were detached to form new brigades while some others were transferred from the main army to reinforce existing brigades, such as Trimble's.
- the second one is led by Major-General Ambrose P. Hill, it is also composed of five brigades and, while with Longstreet's Command, is ordered to report to Jackson's Command and moving north to link with the Left Wing (three Virginia, two Georgia).

The Center Wing, under Major-General James Longstreet, contains three divisions :
- the first one is led by Major-General Daniel H. Hill, it is composed of four brigades, consolidated with Ripley's brigades and other units from the whole army (two North Carolina, one Alabama, one Georgia).
- the second one is led by Brigadier-General Richard H. Anderson, it is also composed of four brigades, some belonging to A. P. Hill's old division (two South Carolina, one Tennessee, one Alabama).
- the third one is led by Brigadier-General John G. Walker, it is composed of three North Carolina brigades, two from the Department of North Carolina and one division created with some extra regiments from Branch's and Walker's old brigades.

The Right Wing, under Major-General John B. Magruder, contains three divisions :
- the first one is led by Major-General Lafayette McLaws, it is composed of two Mississippi brigades, one South Carolina brigade and one Louisiana brigade.
- the second one is led by Brigadier-General David R. Jones, it is composed of four Georgia brigades.
- the third one is led by Brigadier-General William H. C. Whiting, it is composed of one Texas brigade, one Alabama brigade and one North Carolina brigade.

The Reserve Wing, under Major-General Theophilus H. Holmes, contains only one division :
- Huger's division is led by Major-General Benjamin Huger and is composed of three Virginia brigades. The command stays in reserve and is both used to protect Richmond and to escort prisoners during the fight.

Each wing has a specific mission :
- Jackson is ordered to outflank the Fifth Corps north of the Chickahominy when A. P. Hill's Division links with his command. If he is unable to command (because of weariness), he should pass command to Ewell and the mission doesn't change.
- Longstreet is ordered to catch Porter's attention and to prevent him to escape from the field. He must attack only to fix the Fifth Corps. When Jackson's outflanking manoeuver begins, Longstreet must launch a coordinated assault with his two main divisions. Walker's division provides an extra punch if necessary. D. H. Hill can be ordered to direct the assault, while Longstreet brings reinforcements when asked by his subordinate.
- Magruder is ordered to demonstrate against the Army of the Potomac south of the Chickahominy River. He is not allowed to attack. If necessary, Magruder can extend his line to the south-east with Whiting's division. Huger's division is at his disposal if he is attacked by the Second and Third Corps.
-Holmes is assigned to the rear, providing troops to either Longstreet's or Magruder's Commands.
 

67th Tigers

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
This is the structure at the time of the Seven Days:

Longstreet's Wing
MG Longstreet

Longstreet's Grand Division
BG RH Anderson
(14,331 effectives all arms and 43 guns)

RH Anderson's Division (BG Pickett)
RH Anderson's SC Bde (Col Jenkins)
Kemper's VA Bde
Pickett's VA Bde (Col Strange)
(these 3 bdes were those of Longstreet's division that had come down from Manassas)

Wilcox's Division (BG Wilcox)
Wilcox's AL Bde (Col Cumming, 10th Ga, on loan?)
Colston's mixed Bde
Pryor's mixed Bde
(these 3 bdes were assembled from the first reinforcements to Magruder at Yorktown)

Washington Artillery Bn

AP Hill's Light Division (the old "Army of the North")
MG AP Hill
(16,383 effectives and 42 guns)

Field's Division (BG Field)
Field's VA Bde (senior col)
Gregg's SC Bde
JR Anderson's mixed Bde

Branch's Division (BG Branch)
Branch's NC Bde (senior col)
Archer's mixed Bde
Pender's NC Bde
(the 3 brigades of Field's division and Branch were the old army of the north. Archer was transferred from Whitting's division and Pender was a new creation)

DH Hill's Grand Division (transferred to Jackson's control 27th)
MG DH Hill
(12,391 effectives and 32 guns)

Ripley's Division
(BG Ripley)
Ripley's mixed Bde
Garland's mixed Bde (ex-Early's bde)
GB Anderson's mixed Bde

Rodes' Division (BG Rodes)
Rodes' mainly AL Bde
Rains' mixed Bde (Col Colquitt)
(Wise's Va Bde) - detached

Jones' Artillery Battalion

(this division coalesced as the defences of the fortifications of Yorktown proper and Gloucester Point Garland's and Rodes' brigade were part of Early's division that moved from Manassas, Rains' brigade and Wise's brigade were Rains' division defending Yorktown, GB Anderson's Bde was part of DH Hill's division he brought from Manassas and Ripley's brigade came up from NC just before Seven Pines)

Stuart's Cavalry Brigade (2,109 effectives)

Force that debouched to the north of the Chickahominy = 45,124 effectives

Jackson's Wing
("The Army of the Shenandoah")
(22,014 with 44 guns, plus 5 batteries of unknown strength) - 10,026 of this number were from Richmond proper

Stonewall Division (BG Winder)
Winder's VA Bde (senior Col)
Hampton's VA Bde (Col Cunningham)
JR Jones' VA Bde (Col Fulkerson)
Lawton's GA Bde (BG Lawton)

Ewell's Division (BG Ewell)
Elzey's mainly VA Bde
Trimble's mixed Bde
Taylor's LA Bde
MD Line

Whitting's Division (BG Whitting)
Hood's mainly Texas Bde
Law's mixed Bde

Jackson's cavalry

Combined Force North of the Chickahominy = 67,014 effectives

Forces Protecting Richmond

Magruder's Grand Division
(MG Magruder, "The Army of the Peninsula")
(15,778 effectives with 36 guns)

DR Jones' Division (BG DR Jones)
Toomb's GA Bde
DR Jones' GA Bde (Col GT Anderson)

McLaws' Division (MG McLaws)
Semmes' mixed Bde
Kershaw's SC Bde

Magruder's Division
(BG Cobb)
Cobb's mixed Bde (senior Col)
Griffith's MS Bde

Huger's Division (MG Huger, "The Army of the Appomattox")
(11,487 and 24 guns)
Mahone's VA Bde
Wright's mixed Bde
Armistead's VA Bde
Ransom's NC Bde (attached)

Manning Fortifications of Richmond
(6,060)

Artillery Reserve
(1,030 with 55 guns)

Baker's Cavalry Brigade
(2,000)

Manning the Fortifications of Richmond = 36,355

On the James

Holmes' Division
(MG Holmes)
(7,901 and 28 guns)
Daniel's NC Bde
Walker's mixed Bde
Wise's VA Bde (attached)

Chaffin's Bluff: 169
Drewry's Bluff: 791

Total on the James = 8,861

Grand Total, Excluding Petersburg = 112,230 effectives
, plus at least 5 batteries and a couple of unassigned regiments.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Well, looks Like Im the late lass to this party...
Well, I guess I'll go collect my stuff.

Alright, now Im awake, I've made my own OoB for this, mostly restructuring the units into their 1863 organization thereabout, where most of the brigades are uni-state. Also, divided into 3 corps under Magruder, Jackson and Longstreet (to me the best commanders with high level experience). Only counting Infantry, not artillery, and gonna stick with Gav's estimate of 4000 cavalry for Stuart. Numbers based on John Tiller's Peninsula Campaign.

AoNV: Gen Robert E. Lee (83160 men)
-1st Corps: MG James Longstreet (29610 men)
--Light Division: MG A. P. Hill (12180 men)
---1st Brigade: BG Charles Field (40th/47th/55th VA IR + 22nd VA IB; 1640)
---2nd Brigade: BG Marcy Gregg (1st/1st Rifles/12th/13th/14th SC IR; 2150)
---3rd Brigade: BG J. R. Anderson (14th/35th/45th/49th GA IR; 1860)
---4th Brigade: BG Lawrence Branch (7th/18th/28th/33rd/37th NC IR; 2180)
---5th Brigade: BG J. J. Archer (13th AL IR + 5th AL IB + 1st/7th/14th TN IR; 1800)
---6th Brigade: BG Dorsey Pender (13th/16th/22nd/34th/38th NC IR; 2550)
--2nd Division: BG R. H. Anderson (11560 men)
---1st Brigade: BG James Kemper (1st/7th/11th/17th/24th VA IR; 1920)
---2nd Brigade: Col. Micah Jenkins (Palmetto/2nd Rifles/5th/6th SC IR; 1790)
---Gamecock Brigade: BG George Pickett (8th/18th/19th/28th/56th VA IR; 1800)
---4th Brigade: BG Cadmus Wilcox (8th/9th/10th/11th/14th AL IR; 1660)
---5th Brigade: BG Roger Pryor (2nd FL IR + 3rd/15th/30th/32nd VA IR; 2190)
---6th Brigade: BG Winfield Featherston (2nd/11th/12th/16th/19th MS IR + 2nd MS IB; 2200)
--3rd Division: MG Benjamin Huger (5870 men)
---1st Briigade: BG William Mahone (6th/12th/16th/41st VA IR; 2040)
---2nd Brigade: BG A. R. Wright (3rd/22nd/48th GA IR + 2nd GA IB; 1760)
---3rd Division: BG Lo Armistead (9th/14th/38th/53rd/57th VA IR+ 5 VA IB; 2070)
-2nd Corps: MG Stonewall Jackson (27190 men)
--1st Division: BG Wade Hampton (7810 men)
---Stonewall Brigade: BG Charles Winder (2nd/4th/5th/27th/33rd VA IR; 1520)
---2nd Brigade: Col. Samuel Fulkerson (10th/23rd/37th VA IR; 1150)
---3rd Brigade: Col. John A. Campbell (21st/42nd/48th VA IR + 1st VA IB; 1260)
---Georgia Brigade: BG Alexander Lawton (13th/26th/31st/38th/60th/61st GA IR; 3880)
--2nd Division: MG Richard Ewell (5920 men)
---1st Brigade: BG Arnold Elzey (13th/25th/31st/44th/49th/52nd/58th VA IR; 1690)
---Louisiana Tigers Brigade: BG Richard Taylor (5th/6th/7th/8th/9th LA IR + 1st LA Tigers IB; 2270)
---3rd Brigade: BG Isaac Trimble (1st/3rd/6th/21st NC IR + 1st NC S.S. IB; 1960)
--3rd Division: MG D. H. Hill (8980 men)
---1st Brigade: BG Robert Rodes (3rd/5th/6th/12th/26th AL IR; 2390)
---2nd Brigade: BG G. B. Anderson (2nd/4th/14th/30th NC IR; 2010)
---3rd Brigade: BG Sam Garland (5th/12th/20th/23rd NC IR; 1680)
---4th Brigade: BG Roswell Ripley (4th/12th/21st/44th GA IR; 1400)
---5th Brigade: BG Alfred Colquitt (6th/19th/23rd/27th/28th GA IR; 1500)
--4th Division: MG William Whiting (4480 men)
---Texas Brigade: BG John Bell Hood (18th GA IR + Hampton Legion SC IB + 1st/4th/5th TX IR; 2400)
---Alabama Brigade: Col. Evander Law (4th/15th/44th/47th/48th AL IR; 2080)
-3rd Corps: MG John Magruder (22360 men)
--1st Division: BG D. R. Jones (4600 men)
---1st Brigade: Col. Henry Benning (2nd/10th/15th/17th/20th GA IR; 2390)
---2nd Brigade: Col. Tige Anderson (1st Regular/7th/8th/9th/11th GA IR; 2210)
--2nd Division: MG Lafayette McLaws (9860 men)
---1st Brigade: BG P. J. Semmes (1st/2nd/10th/14th/15th LA IR + Coppen's Zouaves; 2750)
---2nd Brigade: BG Howell Cobb (Cobb's Legion/16th/24th/50th GA IR; 2130)
---Mississippi Brigade: BG Richard Griffith (13th/17th/18th/21st MS IR; 2760)
---4th Brigade: BG Joseph Kershaw (2nd/3rd/7th/8th SC IR; 2220)
--3rd Division: BG John G. Walker (7900 men)
---1st Brigade: BG Robert Ransom (24th/25th/26th/35th/49th NC IR; 3570)
---2nd Brigade: Col. S. D. Ramseur (3rd AK IR + 2nd AK IB + 15th/27th/46th/48th NC IR; 2670)
---3rd Brigade: Col. Julius Daniel (43rd/45th/50th NC IR; 1660)
-Cavalry: BG J.E.B. Stuart (4000 men)
 
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