Restricted Op-ed: Get rid of Stonewall monument

Status
Not open for further replies.

wilber6150

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Apr 1, 2009
Location
deep in the Mohawk Valley of Central New York
Ned, just admit that you were wrong. The Wheeling Constitution was destroyed because it was forced upon West Virginians without their consent. The 1872 Constitution, which is the current constitution of the state, was brought into being because tens of thousands of West Virginians had become political prisoners in their own state. And when they finally got the vote back they put in place people like Samuel Price, Henry Mathews and Samuel Woods to give them an instrument of government they felt was their own. And this is the reason why Stonewall's statue is "in line with the vision, ideals and Constitution of West Virginia." Those men were his compatriots and some served under him.

The contents of the Constitution are not my concern, but the motivation in creating it speaks volumes about how West Virginians felt. The very fact that they were able to create it speaks volumes. It would take an earthquake to move that statue.



Thanks, most of my friends think they know too much about West Virginia too, so I understand your sentiment.:geek:
The Wheeling Constitution was forced upon the Virginians who wanted to seceed from the Union, as much as Virginians secession was forced upon the Unionists who wanted to stay loyal and were denied their rights.. Voting fraud, fear of violence at the polling stations, laws being created which tried to squash dissent against the Richmond government, ballot tampering. These were all the things that Unionists were experiencing also...
 

NedBaldwin

Major
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Location
California
Ned, just admit that you were wrong.

Admit I'm wrong? How about you?

The contents of the Constitution are not my concern

The contents are my concern. I'm sorry that the letter of the law is insignificant to you.

And you claim that the 1863 Constitution was "destroyed" yet the citation you directed us to says things like "Despite the swagger, the delegates did not really change all that much." [http://www.wvencyclopedia.org/articles/1558] and "Despite the rhetoric, convention measures did not reach the revolutionary extremes some expected". [http://www.wvencyclopedia.org/articles/1570] There is a lot in the 1863 Constitution that stayed in.
 

ole

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Near Kankakee
Time out is coming soon.

Y'all will be gentlemen or y'all will have no place to argue.
 

16thVA

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 8, 2008
Location
Philadelphia
I agree Ole, my last post. Wrong? First, the old constitution was scrapped. It was a new constitution. The writer, John Stealey, meant that a lot of what was in the old constitution was included in the new constitution, and both constitutions were based heavily on the old Virginia constitution. If they were merely amending the Wheeling constitution that would have been done through the legislature and and public vote. It was a new constitution.

Second, it was progressive ex-Confederates, like CJ Faulkner, who kept the more radical element from creating a reactionary constitution. Your contention that Jackson's statue is not in keeping with this constitution is totally erroneous.
What would he have done differently than Mr. Faulkner? Would he have introduced laws to disfranchise black citizens? Would he have opposed the free school system? I think not.
 

NedBaldwin

Major
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Location
California
Your contention that Jackson's statue is not in keeping with this constitution is totally erroneous.

I previously quoted Article 1, Section 1 of the WV Constitution. The current one. The quote was not erroneous.
Likewise it is not erroneous that Jackson as a general led forces engaged in the exact opposite of Article 1, Section 1. Thus this claim that my contention is erroneous is missing the point.


What would he have done differently than Mr. Faulkner? Would he have introduced laws to disfranchise black citizens? Would he have opposed the free school system? I think not.

Speculating about what Jackson would have done in 1872 is an irrelevant distraction that has nothing to do with whether Jackson as a historic figure is in line with the West Virginia constitution. People don't erect statues to the memory of Jackson's accomplishments in 1872 becuase he had been dead for 9 years. Nor do they erect monuments to his political contributions at any time since he wasn't a political figure. The historic representation of Jackson is as a Confederate general. His time of fame is 1862-1863 as a military leader fighting against the USA.
 

JerseyBart

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Location
New Jersey
***all members should feel free to discuss the topic civilly,but it is a two and a half year old thread that hasn't been posted in in two and a half years. Some posts may be from members who ended their memberships, no longer come around or just don't care anymore or even remember posting comments here.***

Posted as moderator
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top