One of the last known pictures taken of Jefferson Davis.

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Burntout

Cadet
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
20
Davis was THE premier Constitutional expert of his day. They couldnt put him on trial. Several assistant attorney general's resigned over the prospect of putting him on trial. He wanted his day in court. He would have proven that the Southern States were in their legal right to withdraw from the Union.
 

DanSBHawk

First Sergeant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Messages
1,591
Location
Wisconsin
Davis was THE premier Constitutional expert of his day. They couldnt put him on trial. Several assistant attorney general's resigned over the prospect of putting him on trial. He wanted his day in court. He would have proven that the Southern States were in their legal right to withdraw from the Union.
They surely could have put him on trial if the Johnson administration had it's act together. Read "The Lost indictment of Robert E Lee" by John Reeves.

Davis, and Lee, were lucky they weren't tried and executed.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Burntout

Cadet
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
20
They surely could have put him on trial if the Johnson administration had it's act together. Read "The Lost indictment of Robert E Lee" by John Reeves.

Davis, and Lee, were lucky they weren't tried and executed.
Well why didn't they? I'm not interested in post opinions. They would or they wouldn't. And regarding General Lee, Grant himself said he would resign, if the Federal government tried to prosecute him.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

DanSBHawk

First Sergeant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Messages
1,591
Location
Wisconsin
Well why didn't they? I'm not interested in post opinions. They would or they wouldn't. And regarding General Lee, Grant himself said he would resign, if the Federal government tried to prosecute him.
If you're not interested in opinions, then don't post yours.

Johnson's mistakes were insisting on civil rather than military trials, and insisting the chief justice of SCOTUS preside. That chief justice kept delaying the treason trials.

Grant was mistaken. His terms at Appomattox only applied to a parole situation while the country was still at war. Once the war was officially over, Grant's terms no longer applied and Lee and Davis could have been tried for treason.
 

Burntout

Cadet
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
20
No. Johnson was in his right in his power as the Chief executive, in calling for a civil trial. The reason being, was Lincoln surpassed Congress in his call for arms, recruitment, a naval blockade and the building of ship's. Lincoln circumvented Congress and declared war upon the Southern States. Sound familiar?
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

bdtex

Brigadier General
Moderator
Silver Patron
Civil War Photo Contest
Annual Winner
Regtl. Quartermaster Chickamauga 2018 Vicksburg 2019
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Messages
9,062
Location
Houston,TX area
If you ever find yourself in New Orleans or Mobile, be sure and visit Beauvoir. The home has been beautifully restored and renovated after Katrina in 2005. Beauvoir, the library, the cemetery and the unknown soldier monument are all worth the trip to Biloxi!
Regards
David
https://www.visitbeauvoir.org/
Saving that site for a visit when/if I retire and need a place to visit within easy driving distance and that doesn't require a lot of marching in the fields.
 

DanSBHawk

First Sergeant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Messages
1,591
Location
Wisconsin
No. Johnson was in his right in his power as the Chief executive, in calling for a civil trial. The reason being, was Lincoln surpassed Congress in his call for arms, recruitment, a naval blockade and the building of ship's. Lincoln circumvented Congress and declared war upon the Southern States. Sound familiar?
No, not really. I don't understand the logic behind that at all.

The fact is, Davis and Lee and the other indicted top confederates could well have been tried and convicted for treason. But it should have been done within the first few years, before the public just wanted to put the whole thing behind them, and at a military tribunal rather than a civil jury of potentially sympathetic traitors in Virginia.

As it was, the delay dampened the public demand for justice, and we ended up with the losers of the war, like Davis, trying to twist history and explain away their treason post-war.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

DanSBHawk

First Sergeant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Messages
1,591
Location
Wisconsin
Yes, already addressed that. "Parole" only applied while the war was still going on. The thirty-something top confederates who were indicted for treason could have been tried and convicted after the war was officially over. But it took several years to officially end the war.
 

Burntout

Cadet
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
20
Yes, already addressed that. "Parole" only applied while the war was still going on. The thirty-something top confederates who were indicted for treason could have been tried and convicted after the war was officially over. But it took several years to officially end the war.
Could have, but weren't. Oh, and Davis and Lee were pardoned posthumously by Jimmy Carter. So you know what you can do with your treason accusations.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

RochesterBill

Corporal
Joined
Oct 11, 2016
Messages
341
Some
Good catch! Why dey do dat? :confused:
Sometimes it's whimsical, as with the Father Ryan house. Just a cute feature.

In the example with Jeff, its usually for shade. Note all the other mature trees very close to the porch. Cutting them down exposes the building to more sun and thus more heat, so theyd do their best not to chop diwn anything they didnt have to.
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Messages
20,012
Location
Laurinburg NC
The Jefferson Davis Soldiers Home for Confederate veterans open on the grounds of Beauvoir in 1903. By 1931, a 70-bed main hospital and three smaller auxiliary hospitals were located on the grounds. The auxiliary hospitals were for cancer patients, the paralyzed, and for pneumonia and influenza patients. There is also a veteran cemetery on the grounds.
 

DanSBHawk

First Sergeant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Messages
1,591
Location
Wisconsin
Could have, but weren't. Oh, and Davis and Lee were pardoned posthumously by Jimmy Carter. So you know what you can do with your treason accusations.
I was referring to what actually happened in the immediate post-war, not 100+ years later. If anyone wants to know the facts, they can read the book I referenced earlier, "The Lost indictment of Robert E Lee" by John Reeves. I'll leave it at that.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

O' Be Joyful

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
3,252
Location
Use-ta be: Zinn-zä-nätti o-HI-o The BIG city.
"The Lost indictment of Robert E Lee" by John Reeves.
As further info:

Book Talk: The Lost Indictment of Robert E. Lee with John Reeves​
Location:
White House of the Confederacy​

Dr. John Reeves will illuminate the incredible turnaround in attitudes towards Robert E. Lee by examining the evolving case against him from 1865 to 1870 and beyond as he discusses his book, The Lost Indictment of Robert E. Lee. Reeves book tells the story of the forgotten legal and moral case that was made against the Confederate general after the Civil War. The actual indictment went missing for 72 years. Over the past 150 years, the indictment against Lee after the war has both literally and figuratively disappeared from our national consciousness.​
John Reeves has been a teacher, editor, and writer for over twenty-five years. The Civil War, in particular, has been his passion since he first read Bruce Catton’s "The American Heritage Picture History of the Civil War" as an elementary school student in the 1960s. Recently, John’s articles on Robert E. Lee have been featured in The Washington Post and on the History News Network. Earlier in his career, he taught European and American history at various colleges in Chicago, the Bronx, and London. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in Economics from Syracuse University in 1984. Later, he received an MA in European History from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and pursued a PhD in History at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His dissertation was on Britain’s role in Persia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.​
Cost:
Free with admission​
https://acwm.org/calendar-events/book-talk-lost-indictment-robert-e-lee

Looks interesting.
 

Saint Jude

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 15, 2018
Messages
1,292
Location
Heaven
Cooper, in his bio of Jefferson Davis, says the problem was a herpes simplex infection of the cornea, which resulted in the loss of most of the vision.
Apparently, it was very painful as well. Do you think it partially accounts for his crotchety nature?
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top