One Flag Flies Over Us...the Johnnies and Yanks are Americans: Albert H. Boies Co F 4th Michigan on Reconciliation

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
6,032
1553740151637.png

"I feel and think the South had just as brave, heroic men as the North, and I do not condemn any one of them for revering their flag, the Stars and Bars." During the Civil War, Albert H. Boies was a Private in Company F, 4th Michigan Infantry, Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was listed as "killed" at Malvern Hill but "would not stay dead" - then wounded and captured at Gettysburg. In 1915, while serving as Adjutant of the DeGolyer Post of the G.A.R., Boies sent his thoughts on reconciliation to the Confederate Veteran:

...There is very much published nowadays by both Union and Confederates that lays particular stress upon the matter of one side having better, braver, and more heroic soldiers than the other; but I make no such claim. I feel and think the South had just as brave, heroic men as the North, and I do not condemn any one of them for revering their flag, the Stars and Bars. Those same men to-day, and the whole South for that matter, would fight just as quickly for 'Old Glory,' the Stars and Stripes, if insulted by any other nation. Had things turned out differently, had the South won in the Civil War, of course the Stars and Stripes would have taken a back seat, and we of the North undoubtedly would follow the same course as the South does in memory of a lost cause. But we thank God to-day that the North and the South are united; we are as one; one flag flies over us, and the whole world knows that we are a united country and the Johnnies and Yanks are Americans and ever ready to stand by and protect the flag of our country. ...although enemies in those days, they are true friends now. May it ever be thus between the North and the South! ....I wish it were so that the Army of the Potomac and [the Army of] Northern Virginia could mingle and march together. Wouldn't it be glorious?

1553740544278.png

Quote [Confederate Veteran, Volume XXIII, 1915, page 424.] Credit and many thanks to @Tom Elmore who pointed this article out to me.
Veteran image from Ebay; colorized via https://colourise.sg/ Thanks @Boonslick for sharing this site.
Portrait Albert H Boies 1863 https://www.lenconnect.com/opinion/20130629/mark-lenz-gettysburgs-changing-spirit-lives-on
 
Last edited:
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Messages
18,974
Location
Central Pennsylvania
You know, we get ' warned ' not to trust this was the sentiment vets held, that it's too feel-good, warm and fuzzy and there was too much bitterness post war for this to prevail. Maybe some but mostly what you hear and read is this respect for each other as veterans.

McKinley said a lot of the same thing at Atlanta Exposition's Blue and Gray reunion. Liked it so much it's been the signature on my profile for years. " We will fight under the same flag ".
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

byron ed

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
2,776
Location
Midwest
...Those same men to-day, and the whole South for that matter, would fight just as quickly for 'Old Glory,' the Stars and Stripes, if insulted by any other nation...the whole world knows that we are a united country and the Johnnies and Yanks are Americans and ever ready to stand by and protect the flag of our country...
As would be amply demonstrated in two years from then, when even the Johnnies became "Yanks."
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Member of the Year
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
29,865
Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
View attachment 299377
"I feel and think the South had just as brave, heroic men as the North, and I do not condemn any one of them for revering their flag, the Stars and Bars." During the Civil War, Albert H. Boies was a Private in Company F, 4th Michigan Infantry, Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was listed as "killed" at Malvern Hill but "would not stay dead" - then wounded and captured at Gettysburg. In 1915, while serving as Adjutant of the DeGolyer Post of the G.A.R., Boies sent his thoughts on reconciliation to the Confederate Veteran:

...There is very much published nowadays by both Union and Confederates that lays particular stress upon the matter of one side having better, braver, and more heroic soldiers than the other; but I make no such claim. I feel and think the South had just as brave, heroic men as the North, and I do not condemn any one of them for revering their flag, the Stars and Bars. Those same men to-day, and the whole South for that matter, would fight just as quickly for 'Old Glory,' the Stars and Stripes, if insulted by any other nation. Had things turned out differently, had the South won in the Civil War, of course the Stars and Stripes would have taken a back seat, and we of the North undoubtedly would follow the same course as the South does in memory of a lost cause. But we thank God to-day that the North and the South are united; we are as one; one flag flies over us, and the whole world knows that we are a united country and the Johnnies and Yanks are Americans and ever ready to stand by and protect the flag of our country. ...although enemies in those days, they are true friends now. May it ever be thus between the North and the South! ....I wish it were so that the Army of the Potomac and [the Army of] Northern Virginia could mingle and march together. Wouldn't it be glorious?

View attachment 299379
Quote [Confederate Veteran, Volume XXIII, 1915, page 424.] Credit and many thanks to @Tom Elmore who pointed this article out to me.
Veteran image from Ebay; colorized via https://colourise.sg/ Thanks @Boonslick for sharing this site.
Portrait Albert H Boies 1863 https://www.lenconnect.com/opinion/20130629/mark-lenz-gettysburgs-changing-spirit-lives-on
@lelliott19 ,

Your story above reminds me of the song, Another Side, by Sawyer Brown.

You should check it out on YouTube.

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

John Hartwell

Major
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
8,221
Location
Central Massachusetts
1554316851549.png
Another picture of the young Albert Hartson Boies, when in the Hudson Zouave Cadets, before the war. He was just 17 when the war broke out, and his parents agreed to sign for him to enlist with the provision that he not serve in the ranks. So, in September 1861, he was enlisted as a musician in the 4th Michigan. A year later, he was of legal age (18) and joined the ranks as private. Postwar he became a noted amateur ornithologist, and was a member of the Michigan Academy of Scince..

According to: http://www.4thmichigan.com/4th_michigan_roster.htm
"Boies, Albert Hartson, Lenawee. Enlisted in Company F, Fourth Infantry, September 10, 1861, at Hudson, for 3 years, age 17. Height 5’5”. Complexion light. Eyes black. Hair dark. Farm laborer by trade and musician. Mustered September 18, 1861. Wounded in action July 1, 1862 Malvern Hill shot in chest, saved by diary. Wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2, 1863 in right hand, third and fourth fingers, taken prisoner, escaped that night. Sent to Summit House Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Transferred to Invalid Corp March 15, 1864 as Chief Musician. Discharged at expiration of term of service at Elmira, New York, October 1, 1864, from Company F, Nineteenth Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps. Resided with his parents and five siblings. Was a recruiting officer for Spanish-American War and World War I."​
In the late 1880s, he apparently also wrote his "War Memories," for a local newspaper. I am trying to find the details; so far without success.
 
Last edited:

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
6,032
So glad to hear he wouldn't stay dead. An outstanding American patriot.
Indeed. :D Boies described it this way, "I had my share of sorrow, for my comrades left me in nearly every battle, and sorrow and trouble I had to share with others of my regiment. I was killed at Malvern Hill, so my comrades say, but I would not stay dead...." [Confederate Veteran, Volume XXIII, 1915, page 424.] and John's info above says, "The diary he had in his pocket when a bullet tore into it and knocked him senseless at Malvern Hill remains in the Hudson Museum." @major bill do you know anything about the Hudson museum? Is it still in existence?

In the late 1880s, he apparently also wrote his "War Memories," for a local newspaper. I am trying to find the details; so far without success.
John, have you had any luck in locating Boies' memoirs? Or have any idea what newspaper they were published in? I sure would like to read them if anyone knows where they might be found?
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Kurt G

First Sergeant
Joined
May 23, 2018
Messages
1,019
Boies is mentioned 4 times in the book "The 4th Michigan Infantry at the Battle of New Bridge, Virginia" ( Martin Bertera 2002). It includes a quote from his War Memories."Since the war I have met Captain Hagerty (5th Louisiana) and in that fight (New Bridge).He said his men never forgot the good care shown them , and kind treatment they received while prisoners of the 4th Michigan."
He is also mentioned several times in "The 4th Michigan Infantry in the Civil War" (Bertera and Crawford 2010). The story of his wounding at Malvern Hill and his recovery changed in detail a few times . Claims he met Lincoln while recovering may be suspect . At the dedication to the Michigan monuments at Gettysburg in 1889 he carried roses from Michigan to place on the grave of a comrade.
I can find no information that his "War Memories " is in print . There is a museum in Hudson , Michigan and it says it has Civil War items . I'm sure Major Bill has been there and will have better information than me .
 

John Hartwell

Major
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
8,221
Location
Central Massachusetts
John, have you had any luck in locating Boies' memoirs? Or have any idea what newspaper they were published in? I sure would like to read them if anyone knows where they might be found?
I'm afraid not. I searched all the newspaper archives I have access to, but could find no trace of the supposed Memoirs. There were several mentions of him in various newspapers, mostly about his attendance at 4th Michigan reunions. The Tacoma (Wash) News Tribune of August 5th 1919,has the following:
Boies.png
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Kurt G

First Sergeant
Joined
May 23, 2018
Messages
1,019
In the back of my book on the battle of new Bridge it has a listing of sources .
"War Memories" by Comrade A.H. Boies , Hudson Historical Museum , Hudson , Michigan . Perhaps the museum has copies for sale .
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top