"Oldest Steamboat in the World"

Mark F. Jenkins

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#21
Apparently, they could not be backed against the current which seems like a rather glaring design flaw to me. I wonder why Eads let the City class be built without watertight compartments, given that was sort of how he got involved with the Army\Navy in the first place? What exactly was his relationship with Pook in building them? It has always seemed to me Eads yards tended to produce pretty high quality ironclads for his day, some of the Milwaukee class monitors are really only second to the Canonicus class as the best of the war.
Eads actually went to Washington with an idea to turn his biggest catamaran snagboat (Submarine No. 7) into a mobile battery to control traffic at and to defend the strategic point of Cairo, Illinois, where the Ohio joins the Mississippi. He was met with a polite refusal at the time, but when the contracts were let for the Pook Turtles, he made sure to be the low bidder. (He was authorized by General Fremont to turn his snagboat into the Benton as well, after all.) John Lenthal came up with a design for a river gunboat, which was heavily modified by Pook, and Eads as builder put some changes in as they went.
 

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Charlestonian displaced to Bodrum,Turkey
#22
I've only scanned the posts so far, so forgive me if this has been addressed, but I believe the oldest steamboat predated 1836 by quite a bit.
In 1801, Charlotte Dundas was operational using a Newcom low pressure steam engine. Robert Fulton had a working steam boat at the same time, and by 1807, he had Clermont, the first commercial steamboat.
So, I assume the pictures were taken very late in her career, close to 1924, and what they meant was she was the oldest surviving steamboat at that time. I wonder if that claim could have been challenged from Europe? My guess is it very likely could have been.
 

Carronade

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Aug 4, 2011
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Pennsylvania
#23
I wonder why Eads let the City class be built without watertight compartments,
Few if any ships had watertight compartmentation back then, although the Chinese had used it centuries earlier. It only became common with the invention of weapons which could inflict underwater damage. It was also more practical in iron or steel ships than wooden.
 



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