Discussion Oh yes it did

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

wbull1

First Sergeant
Official Vendor
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
1,098
Although it is frequently said that the Emancipation Proclamation did not free any slaves immediately, that is incorrect.

https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/31/the-grove-of-gladness/

In fact, Lincoln’s proclamation [The Emancipation Proclamation] formally freed tens of thousands of slaves in Union-controlled areas of Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi, and North Carolina — as well as the South Carolina Sea Islands.
 

Norm53

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
779
Location
Cape May, NJ
Although it is frequently said that the Emancipation Proclamation did not free any slaves immediately, that is incorrect.

https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/31/the-grove-of-gladness/

In fact, Lincoln’s proclamation [The Emancipation Proclamation] formally freed tens of thousands of slaves in Union-controlled areas of Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi, and North Carolina — as well as the South Carolina Sea Islands.
I think that the slave stats are sth like these:

4.0M total on 1/1/63
- 0.5M not freed on 1/1/63
=3.5M legally freed on 1/1/63
- 25,000 to 75,000 actually freed on 1/1/63
=3.4+M actually freed from CSA control from 1/1/63 to 4/9/65

3.5M total legally and actually freed by 4/9/65
 
Last edited:
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

uaskme

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Messages
2,387
How many did it Technically re-enslave. EP exempted areas under Federal Control. TN and parts of LA, for instance. Many Slaves in those areas walked off the job, and were forced back to the Plantations. Banks and Spoons didn’t want them just walking around and wanted the Plantations to perform. White men, who they thought were Loyal, needed Black labor.
 

wbull1

First Sergeant
Official Vendor
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
1,098
How many did it Technically re-enslave. EP exempted areas under Federal Control. TN and parts of LA, for instance. Many Slaves in those areas walked off the job, and were forced back to the Plantations. Banks and Spoons didn’t want them just walking around and wanted the Plantations to perform. White men, who they thought were Loyal, needed Black labor.
Good point, except that, even when forced into labor, they knew their family members could not be sold away from them. They could not be "sold down the river." Re-exploited but not re-enslaved.
 

wbull1

First Sergeant
Official Vendor
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
1,098
I think that the slave stats are sth like these:

4.0M total on 1/1/63
- 0.5M not-freed on 1/1/63
=3.5M legally freed on 1/1/63
- 25,000 to 75,000 actually freed on 1/1/63
=3.4+M actually freed from CSA control from 1/1/63 to 4/9/65

3.5M total legally and actually freed by 4/9/65
Thanks for the information.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

sailorjoe

Private
Joined
May 17, 2019
Messages
57
The only slaves that Lincoln may have actually freed were those living behind lines in the areas in the South that were under occupation by Northern troops. And even there many or maybe a majority chose to remain where they were and doing what they always had done. Some tagged along with the Union army and they became a huge problem to the generals commanding those armies as to how to feed and care for them, etc. Because the political Southern leadership thought that Lincoln had no authority to make laws regarding property in their country, perhaps the major practical effect was to encourage more slave to attempt escape.
 

uaskme

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Messages
2,387
Good point, except that, even when forced into labor, they knew their family members could not be sold away from them. They could not be "sold down the river." Re-exploited but not re-enslaved.
Wonder what they thought?

Whites left the SC Sea Islands. Yankees didn’t have any Southern Whites, to give them back to. So, I guess they couldn’t Un-Free them
 
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
6,839
Location
About 47 miles Northwest of the Canadian border
How many did it Technically re-enslave. EP exempted areas under Federal Control. TN and parts of LA, for instance. Many Slaves in those areas walked off the job, and were forced back to the Plantations. Banks and Spoons didn’t want them just walking around and wanted the Plantations to perform. White men, who they thought were Loyal, needed Black labor.
In those exempted areas if the slaves made it to a Union patrol, camp or facility in any area of the so called Confederate States, they were not exempt under the Second Confiscation Act or the March 13, 1862 Congressional Act that prohibited the return of escaped slaves.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

matthew mckeon

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
13,796
Emancipation was a gradual process, beginning with the contraband policy, the Confiscation Acts, Attorney General Bates' statement that African Americans were American citizens. Not least of it was the tens of thousand of African Americans voting with their feet to leave for Union lines, and enlist in the United States Army.

The Emancipation Proclamation was a sweeping action to be sure, the fatal blow. People mumble that it didn't do enough. Think for two seconds. The Union would have to win the war to make any emancipation scheme work. Once the authority of the US had been reestablished, it wasn't like a few border state slave enclaves were going to be able to survive. In fact they didn't.

The 13th was the nuclear bomb to slavery's Hiroshima, but it was the end of a process.

Really, think for a minute. Slavery had hummed along for 200 + years by 1860, and there never were more slaves, and more slave holding territory then in 1860. It was going to take some time to pull out the root of that particular noxious weed.
 

byron ed

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
2,942
Location
Midwest
How many did it Technically re-enslave.
Some, not nearly all. A moot point by that time really. The reality was that everyone at that point realized -- whatever further legislation might be passed or whoever won the war -- chattel slavery was done for. The South had become a sieve for escaped slaves, so distracted with the war it wasn't maintaining effective slave patrols, and so many nearby Union lines to drift into. What was the Law? Pfft.

Several new avenues of transportation and routes away from the South and East were in the works, to be effected almost immediately upon war's end, some already underway. Everyone realized that after war's end, whoever had won, keeping any population anywhere was no longer viable.

So by mid-war chattel slavery was done for. All that was left was for the Laws to catch up with the reality, some would say a process still underway today.

Spare us the "over-arching disingenuous, profiteering white conspiracy that schemed to keep freed blacks under their thumb" thing. That's far overplayed. There have been criminal conspiracies underway in every age and nation of Mankind, to mention the Confederacy for one. Never perfect, yet U.S. society has tended to correct and prevail in spite of it, loss of white majority regardless. We're in for better times.
 
Last edited:
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top