Official Thread of the Knights of Edisto

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OldReliable1862

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Thomas Greely Stevenson was born on 3 February 1836 in Boston, Massachusetts. He joined the state militia as a private, advancing to the rank of major by the beginning of the War of Secession. On 3 December 1861, Stevenson was appointed colonel of the 24th Massachusetts Infantry. Stevenson and his regiment fought with Burnside's command in the battles of Roanoke Island and New Bern. With the arrival of Union reinforcements in North Carolina, he became a brigade commander in John G. Foster's division.

While most of the Union forces in North Carolina were sent to Virginia, Foster's command stayed. Stevenson's brigade participated in the Goldsborough Expedition in December 1862, tearing up railroad tracks and destroying the Goldsboro Bridge after a brief battle with Thomas L. Clingman's brigade. Stevenson was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers on 24 December 1862, and then held a series of quiet coastal postings in the Carolinas.

Stevenson next commanded the 3rd brigade in Alfred H. Terry's division in the siege of Charleston Harbor from July to September 1863. Stevenson remained in brigade command in the Charleston area until January 1864.

In April 1864, Stevenson was reunited with his old comrades in the Burnside Expedition when he given command of the 1st division of Burnside's IX Corps. Stevenson held a reputation as one of Burnside's best division commanders, fighting in the battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Court House. During the latter battle, on 10 May, Burnside's corps had taken part in half-hearted fighting on Lee's eastern flank. Only Wilcox's division was in front of the IX Corps; Grant had missed an excellent opportunity to exploit Lee's vulnerable point. While resting beneath a tree, Stevenson was killed by a sniper's bullet. Stevenson was buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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@OldReliable1862 and @JPK Huson 1863 , I'd love to have this thread moved over to the Other Notable Biographies as this is more about people's biographies rather than photography. Would you mind?

Good Heavens luinrina, thanks for asking but fyi, it's never necessary from me- if anyone feels a thread is better elsewhere my guess is someone just found a thread that should have been elsewhere in the first place. :angel:
 
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Luke Freet

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There appears to be another C. C. Sanders.
Christopher Columbus Sanders (Born May 10th 1840) was Lt. Colonel (eventually Colonel in January 1864) of the 24th Georgia, and he would command Cobb's/Wofford's Brigade several times: First at Antietam, and again after Wofford left the ANV sometime in 1864. He survived the war and became a prominent banker in his home town of Gainesville, before he passed away at age 68 in 1908.
He would be 21 when he was made Lt. Colonel, 23 when made Colonel, and just a month shy of turning 25 when he and Kershaw's Division was captured at Sayler's Creek.
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Petition to induct Colonel Christopher C. Sanders into the Knights of Edisto @OldReliable1862
 

Luke Freet

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Also, he's probably been mentioned before, but:
James R. Hagood (Born 26th November, 1864), youngest regular Colonel in Lee's Army.
Served in 1st S.C. Regiment of Jenkin's Brigade before being appointed it's Colonel November 16th, 1863, aged only 18, and just a week away from turning 19. Survived the war, only to die in a train wreck 5 years after the war, on November 15th, 1870
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OldReliable1862

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There appears to be another C. C. Sanders.
Christopher Columbus Sanders (Born May 10th 1840) was Lt. Colonel (eventually Colonel in January 1864) of the 24th Georgia, and he would command Cobb's/Wofford's Brigade several times: First at Antietam, and again after Wofford left the ANV sometime in 1864. He survived the war and became a prominent banker in his home town of Gainesville, before he passed away at age 68 in 1908.
He would be 21 when he was made Lt. Colonel, 23 when made Colonel, and just a month shy of turning 25 when he and Kershaw's Division was captured at Sayler's Creek.
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Petition to induct Colonel Christopher C. Sanders into the Knights of Edisto @OldReliable1862
Thanks for posting this Luke - as I've said before, all this is in good fun, but as I understood it (@lelliott19 and I are honestly making all this up as we go along), all the boy officers are considered to be "Knights of Edisto." We do induct members at their request however.

Liking the new avatar by the way!
 
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Luke Freet

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Thanks for posting this Luke - as I've said before, all this is in good fun, but as I understood it (@lelliott19 and I are honestly making all this up as we go along), all the boy officers are considered to be "Knights of Edisto." We do induct members at their request however.

Liking the new avatar by the way!
Thank you.
Seems fitting with my youth, along with of course the aforementioned 160-separated shared day of birth
 

Luke Freet

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Some lesser officers (mostly from Texas brigade so far):

Edward Foster Hoge, born around 1840, Colonel of 9th Georgia from March 1864 (approx. 24 years of age)

Ike Turner, 22 years of age at start of the war. Commanded Company K of 5th Texas, the youngest and probably the ablest of that fine formation's company commanders. Often commanded the Brigade's picket and skirmish line, and in 1863 was promoted Major, with intention of organizing a Sharpshooter battalion, in the same vain as the 3rd Georgia S.S. Battalion of Wofford's brigade. Sadly, and ironically, he would be felled by a sharpshooter during the Siege of Suffolk

Frank B. Chilton, Born 1845. Private in Company H, 4th Texas, and fought from Gaines Mill to Second Mananas despite being underage. Officially discharged in September of 1862, before Antietam, after the authorities figured out he was under-aged. Later became a Captain, serving as Jerome Robertson's Ordnance Officer.
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And lest we forget Decimus and Ultimus Barziza: Born in 1838 to a former Venetian noble, first became a 1st Lieutenant and later Captain in Company C, 4th Texas. He was wounded in the attack on Little Round Top, and was captured and sent to Johnson Island prison. He was part of an escape attempt, which succeed in getting him to Canada. He returned to Texas and lived until 1882.
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Luke Freet

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Vannoy Hartog Manning (Better known as Van Manning): Born July 26th, 1839. Became Colonel of the legendary 3rd Arkansas Infantry as part of first J. G. Walker's Brigade and more notably in the Texas Brigade. He was badly wounded at the Wilderness and captured, not being released until wars end. He'd take part in postwar politics, and died in 1892
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Solon Z. Ruff: Colonel of 18th Georgia Regiment. Born 1830. Graduate and Professor at GMI until war broke out. Became Lt. Col. in William T. Wofford's legendary 18th Georgia Regiment, comrades of the Texas brigade from the Seven Days to Second Manassas to Antietam. In these latter 2 battles, Ruff directly commanded the regiment, as Wofford led the Texas brigade. The 18th Georgia was transferred to Cobb's Brigade, where theyd defend Mayre's Heights. Wofford was promoted to Brigadier and given command of the brigade. Ruff then promoted to Colonel in January 1863. In this capacity, he'd serve at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. In command of Wofford's brigade at the Siege of Knoxville, he was killed in the doomed assault on Fort Sanders, 29th November 1863, aged approximately 33 years old.
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AUG

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Ike Turner, 22 years of age at start of the war. Commanded Company K of 5th Texas, the youngest and probably the ablest of that fine formation's company commanders. Often commanded the Brigade's picket and skirmish line, and in 1863 was promoted Major, with intention of organizing a Sharpshooter battalion, in the same vain as the 3rd Georgia S.S. Battalion of Wofford's brigade. Sadly, and ironically, he would be felled by a sharpshooter during the Siege of Suffolk
I posted Ike Turner back on page 4, post #74.

Two other young officers from the Texas Brigade were brothers, Capt. William H. and Lt. Robert H. Gaston in Co. H, 1st Texas Infantry. I think Capt. William H. Gaston was actually the youngest company commander in the brigade at only 21 years old by 1862 and was known as the "Boy Captain," although he later ended his service with the brigade and transferred to the Trans-Mississippi in 1863. His brother Robert was only 17 or 18 when he was killed at Antietam.

I have a thread on the Gaston brothers here: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/two-texas-brothers-at-antietam.143943/
 

AUG

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Several other young company officers in the Texas Brigade:

Third Lt. Benjamin A. Campbell, Co. G, 1st Texas Infantry 1.jpg

Lt. Benjamin A. Campbell, Co. G, 1st Texas Infantry. He was only 21 years old when he was killed as acting commander of the company on July 2 at Gettysburg.

There's a great article on him in Military Images Magazine:
https://militaryimages.atavist.com/for-life-and-lone-star-honor-summer-2017


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Captain Langdon Cheves McCord, Co. H "South Carolina Zouave Volunteers" of Hampton's Legion.

Born on April 7, 1841 in Columbia, SC, he was elected captain in fall of 1861. The company didn't join the Legion til July 1862, and in their first major battle at Second Manassas Capt. McCord was "shot down at the head of his company, wounded in three places." He lingered in a hospital in Richmond until he succumbed to his wounds on January 23, 1863.

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Thomas Muldrup Logan.

Born in Charleston, SC, November 3, 1840. He rose from a lieutenant in Co. A "Washington Light Infantry" of Hampton's Legion to colonel, taking command of the Legion in 1864. Was promoted to brigadier general in command of a cavalry brigade in 1865.

Full bio of him here: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/brig-gen-thomas-muldrup-logan.152301/
 
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ARW

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I posted a thread last year about Jerome but I guess I will add it here as well.

Jerome Ticknor Furman, my 1st cousin 3 generations back, first served as a Sergeant on Co. B of the 52nd Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry from October 1861 until August 1863, when he was granted his discharge to accept a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the first negro regiment, Co. D of the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, later the 33rd Regiment of United State Colored Troops. 2nd Lt. Jerome Ticknor Furman served in this regiment for the remainder of the war and was murdered , shot in the back by Manson Sherrill "Manse" Jolly, on the front porch or near the steps of the principal hotel of Wall Hollow/Walhalla, South Carolina in August of 1865, four months after the end of the Civil War. He was 25 years old.

As night came on and the evening meal was over, Lieut. Furman stepped out on the front porch when a tall, villainous looking ex-Confederate came up, bade him good-evening, and said: "We are glad to have you come into our town for we are absolutely without any kind of government. The town is full of desperate characters; we are living in constant fear of our lives and the presence of United States troops will no doubt soon restore order and be a blessing to us." His mode of speech and cordial manner threw the officer completely off his guard and he foolishly accepted an invitation to take a walk with his newly made acquaintance. They had only walked a few steps before the villain drew his revolver, shot the officer in the back, and as he fell, put the muzzle of his pistol to the head of the dying man and discharged two more bullets into his brain, and then disappeared into the darkness.

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I guess he would be impressed if a relative became Knight because of him.
 
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