Official Thread of the Knights of Edisto

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OldReliable1862

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The Knights of Edisto are a noble order dedicated to the memory of the Union and Confederate officers under the age of thirty, especially those who gave their lives in the service of their flag before reaching that age. It is named for Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, known as the "Prince of Edisto". This thread shall be used to relate the lives and deeds of these men, and discuss their skill and valor. It is hoped this serve the edification and entertainment of the users of CivilWarTalk.

The first biography discussed here will fittingly be that of Micah Jenkins.
Micah_Jenkins.jpg

Jenkins was born on 1 December 1835 on Edisto Island in South Carolina. He excelled in military arts from the beginnng seemingly, graduating first in his class in 1854 from the South Carolina Military Institute, called "The Citadel".

When the war began, he was quickly elected colonel of the 5th South Carolina Infantry, fighting at First Manassas under David R. Jones. He temporarily commanded Richard H. Anderson's brigade at the battle of Seven Pines, receiving a wound to the knee. He was wounded again in the shoulder and chest at Second Manassas, and was recuperating during the Maryland Campaign.

Jenkins was present at Fredericksburg, but did not take part in the fighting. He took part in the Suffolk Campaign with Longstreet missing Chancellorsville. His brigade was kept at Richmond, and they did not go north to fight at Gettysburg. Longstreet's corps was then sent to Georgia, and Jenkins fought at Chickamauga. John Bell Hood, Jenkins' division commander, was promoted to corps command after this battle, sparking a bitter feud with Evander Law over who would receive the division. Longstreet preferred Jenkins, and he had seniority, so Jenkins briefly commanded it. Law protested; he had commanded the division when Hood was wounded at Gettysburg and Chickamauga. The matter was resolved when Charles W. Field, senior to both Jenkins and Law, was given the command.

Jenkins was sick at the time of the Battle of the Wildnerness, but arrived at the battle in an ambulance ready to lead his troops into battle. He knew very well the great importance of the attack, and summoned his close friend Colonel Ashbury Coward of the 5th South Carolina. "Old man," he said, "we are in for it today. We are to break the enemy's line where the Brock Road cuts across the pike. The point," he indicated the direction with an extended arm, "lies just over there, I think." Smiling, he continued, "Your regiment is the battalion of direction. Tell your men that South Carolina is looking for every man to do his duty to her this day." Porter Alexander rode by to find a good position for the artillery. Alexander shook Jenkins' hand and poked a little fun at his friend's style of address. "Old man, I hope you will win that next grade this morning." "Well," answered Jenkins, turning to his men, "we are going to fight for old South Carolina today, aren't we boys?" The men gave a shout in reply.

The column was ready to move, and Jenkins was in high spirits. "Sorrel, it was splendid," he said, throwing an arm around the man's shoulder, "We shall smash them now." As Longstreet and Jenkins, riding close at hand, came near Mahone's troops, the men opened fire. Jenkins' troops had received new uniforms of a very dark, almost black, gray, leading their compatriots to think Yankees were approaching. Jenkins was struck in the skull and fell, while Longstreet received a near fatal wound to the neck. The bullet that hit Jenkins had passed through his temple, entering his brain. He babbled incoherently for a few moments, cheering and urging his men to drive the enemy into the river. He soon was too weak to talk, and Coward arrived to see his friend laying delirious on a litter. Kneeling by his side, he said, "Jenkins...Mike, do you know me?" he whispered to no answer. Jenkins' hand convulsed, then his whole body spasmed and stopped. Coward stood in shock as Jenkins' body was raised into the ambulance.

Jenkins' son, Micah Jenkins Jr., later served as Captain of Troop K of the "Rough Riders" in the Spanish-American War.

To apply for membership in the knights, contact either myself or @lelliott19. A 'dubbing' will be held, and membership shall be conferred upon that user.
 
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Vicksburger

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The Knights of Edisto are a noble order dedicated to the memory of the Union and Confederate officers under the age of thirty, especially those who gave their lives in the service of their flag before reaching that age. It is named for Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, known as the "Prince of Edisto". This thread shall be used to relate the lives and deeds of these men, and discuss their skill and valor. It is hoped this serve the edification and entertainment of the users of CivilWarTalk.

The first biography discussed here will fittingly be that of Micah Jenkins.
Micah_Jenkins.jpg

Jenkins was born on 1 December 1835 on Edisto Island in South Carolina. He excelled in military arts from the beginnng seemingly, graduating first in his class in 1854 from the South Carolina Military Institute, called "The Citadel".

When the war began, he was quickly elected colonel of the 5th South Carolina Infantry, fighting at First Manassas under David R. Jones. He temporarily commanded Richard H. Anderson's brigade at the battle of Seven Pines, receiving a wound to the knee. He was wounded again in the shoulder and chest at Second Manassas, and was recuperating during the Maryland Campaign.

Jenkins was present at Fredericksburg, but did not take part in the fighting. He took part in the Suffolk Campaign with Longstreet missing Chancellorsville. His brigade was kept at Richmond, and they did not go north to fight at Gettysburg. Longstreet's corps was then sent to Georgia, and Jenkins fought at Chickamauga. John Bell Hood, Jenkins' division commander, was promoted to corps command after this battle, sparking a bitter feud with Evander Law over who would receive the division. Longstreet preferred Jenkins, and he had seniority, so Jenkins briefly commanded it. Law protested; he had commanded the division when Hood was wounded at Gettysburg and Chickamauga. The matter was resolved when Charles W. Field, senior to both Jenkins and Law, was given the command.

Jenkins was sick at the time of the Battle of the Wildnerness, but arrived at the battle in an ambulance, yet ready to lead his troops into battle. He knew very well the great importance of the attack, and summoned his close friend Colonel Ashbury Coward of the 5th South Carolina. "Old man," he said, "we are in for it today. We are to break the enemy's line where the Brock Road cuts across the pike. The point," he indicated the direction with an extended arm, "lies just over there, I think." Smiling, he continued, "Your regiment is the battalion of direction. Tell your men that South Carolina is looking for every man to do his duty to her this day." Porter Alexander rode by to find a good position for the artillery. Alexander shook Jenkins' hand and poked a little fun at his friend's style of address. "Old man, I hope you will win that next grade this morning." "Well," answered Jenkins, turning to his men, "we are going to fight for old South Carolina today, aren't we boys?" The men gave a shout in reply.

The column was ready to move, and Jenkins was in high spirits. "Sorrel, it was splendid," he said, throwing an arm around the man's shoulder, "We shall smash them now." As Longstreet and Jenkins, riding close at hand, came near Mahone's troops, the men opened fire. Jenkins' troops had received new uniforms of a very dark, almost black, gray, leading their compatriots to think Yankees were approaching. Jenkins was struck in the skull and fell, while Longstreet received a near fatal wound to the neck. The bullet that hit Jenkins had passed through his temple, entering his brain. He babbled incoherently for a few moments, cheering and urging his men to drive the enemy into the river. He soon was too weak to talk, and Coward arrived to see his friend laying delirious on a litter. Kneeling by his side, he said, "Jenkins...Mike, do you know me?" he whispered to no answer. Jenkins' hand convulsed, then his whole body spasmed and stopped. Coward stood in shock as Jenkins' body was raised into the ambulance.

Jenkins' son, Micah Jenkins Jr., later served as Captain of Troop K of the "Rough Riders" in the Spanish-American War.

To apply for membership in the knights, contact either myself or @lelliott19. A 'dubbing' will be held, and membership shall be conferred upon that user.
Very appropriate for you to start with Micah Jenkins. Being a Western guy, I was not aware of him until I was reading about his troops at Glendale and became a great admirer, and read the biography "The Struck Eagle." At Seven Pines his brigade was so far in advance they were literally unsupported. He was a great guy! Sounds like a good idea. (Stephen Dodson Ramseur would be another).
 

lelliott19

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To apply for membership in the knights, contact either myself or @lelliott19. A 'dubbing' will be held, and membership shall be conferred upon that user.
Just to clarify, that's a 'dubbing' ....... NOT a 'drubbing.'
Just don't want anyone to refrain from membership due to confusion. :D
<We already had one thread about a drubbing and we certainly don't need another.:nah disagree:>
 
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lelliott19

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I, lelliott, being an officer in good standing <ummm cough> of the famed and ever valiant Knights of Edisto hereby dub thee, @ikesdad and @TnFed , Knights of Edisto!

Arise, brave knights, and go forth to honor all the "boy generals" and young officers who gave their life for the cause for which they fought: the intelligent and zealous young Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, the gallant Major John Pelham, and the courageous Colonel Isaac Avery, of the CS Army. The valiant Lieut. Willie Grout (the youngest Union officer killed in the Civil War,) the fearless Bvt. Brigadier General Henry Livermore Abbott, and the heroic Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing (honored a century and a half late,) of the US Army. And all the other young men, noted for feats of courage, who committed to the cause in which they believed, gave their lives while so doing. Arise, my brave knights, and go forth!
 

AUG

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Longstreet's corps was then sent to Georgia, and Jenkins fought at Chickamauga.
Just want to note that Jenkins and his brigade actually weren't engaged at Chickamauga; they arrived too late to take part in the battle. However, his brigade was the main Confederate force engaged in the battle of Wauhatchie at Chattanooga.

He temporarily commanded Richard H. Anderson's brigade at the battle of Seven Pines, receiving a wound to the knee. He was wounded again in the shoulder and chest at Second Manassas, and was recuperating during the Maryland Campaign.
At Glendale/Frayser's Farm he was also hit in the shoulder by a spent canister round, not piercing the skin but bruising it severely, and was hit in the breast and leg with spent shell fragments. He had a dozen other near misses in the battle, as detailed Here.
 
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TomV71

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Just want to note that Jenkins and his brigade actually weren't engaged at Chickamauga; they arrived too late to take part in the battle. However, his brigade was the main Confederate force engaged in the battle of Wauhatchie at Chattanooga.
Correct. Only three brigades from Hoods Division of Longstreets corps was present at Chickamauga on September 19, with an additional two brigades from McLaw's Division on September 20.
Jenkins and his brigade did not arrive until late on September 21.

Since Jenkins was senior, he was put in command of Hoods Division shortly after Chickamauga as replacement for Law who had taken command of the Division when Hood was wounded. Jenkins commanded Hoods Division until 1864 when C.W.Field took command of the Division in early 1864 as mentioned in the original post.

At Wauhatchie, even if Jenkins was commanding the division, he was in charge of own brigade under Col.Bratton and Benning's Brigade during the specific battle, while Law was in charge of his own and the Texas Brigade.
 
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OldReliable1862

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I, lelliott, being an officer in good standing <ummm cough> of the famed and ever valiant Knights of Edisto hereby dub thee, @ikesdad and @TnFed , Knights of Edisto!

Arise, brave knights, and go forth to honor all the "boy generals" and young officers who gave their life for the cause for which they fought: the intelligent and zealous young Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, the gallant Major John Pelham, and the courageous Colonel Isaac Avery, of the CS Army. The valiant Lieut. Willie Grout (the youngest Union officer killed in the Civil War,) the fearless Bvt. Brigadier General Henry Livermore Abbott, and the heroic Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing (honored a century and a half late,) of the US Army. And all the other young men, noted for feats of courage, who committed to the cause in which they believed, gave their lives while so doing. Arise, my brave knights, and go forth!
Alonzo Cushing - the guy takes a wound to the shoulder from a shell fragment, then his abdomen is torn open by another fragment. He's holding his guts in with his hand - his guts in with his hand - and still he's continues in command of his battery, until he's shot in the skull. Cushing's actions demand the respect of every man who hears of them. You read about him, and realize these were the men the Valkyries were sent to gather. I'd give quite a bit to shake his hand and sit down with him.
 
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ikesdad

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I, lelliott, being an officer in good standing <ummm cough> of the famed and ever valiant Knights of Edisto hereby dub thee, @ikesdad and @TnFed , Knights of Edisto!

Arise, brave knights, and go forth to honor all the "boy generals" and young officers who gave their life for the cause for which they fought: the intelligent and zealous young Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, the gallant Major John Pelham, and the courageous Colonel Isaac Avery, of the CS Army. The valiant Lieut. Willie Grout (the youngest Union officer killed in the Civil War,) the fearless Bvt. Brigadier General Henry Livermore Abbott, and the heroic Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing (honored a century and a half late,) of the US Army. And all the other young men, noted for feats of courage, who committed to the cause in which they believed, gave their lives while so doing. Arise, my brave knights, and go forth!
Great ! Now I have something else to put on my resume.
 

luinrina

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To apply for membership in the knights, contact either myself or @lelliott19.
:wavespin: May I please join your illustrious group? And of course the D.H. Hill Fan Club too? I swear I'm an officer of good standing. :angel:

Just to clarify, that's a 'dubbing' ....... NOT a 'drubbing.'
Just don't want anyone to refrain from membership due to confusion. :D
<We already had one thread about a drubbing and we certainly don't need another.:nah disagree:>
:rofl: Now I'm curious about that thread and will have to search for it.

In case anyone is interested in membership - there is no hazing involved.:D
Initiation into the Knights of Edisto is a simple "dubbing".....and membership in the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club requires no especial mathematical problem solving skills. :giggle:
Awwww. :frown: I was so looking forward to having to answer mathematical problems to gain membership in the D.H. Hill Fan Club. :wink: :D
 

OldReliable1862

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I, OldReliable1862, being an officer in good standing <ahem cough> of the famed and ever valiant Knights of Edisto hereby dub thee, @luinrina, a Knight of Edisto!

Arise, brave knight, and go forth to honor all the "boy generals" and young officers who gave their life for the cause for which they fought: the intelligent and zealous young Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, the gallant Major John Pelham, and the courageous Colonel Isaac Avery, of the CS Army. The valiant Lieut. Willie Grout (the youngest Union officer killed in the Civil War,) the fearless Bvt. Brigadier General Henry Livermore Abbott, and the heroic Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing (honored a century and a half late,) of the US Army. And all the other young men, noted for feats of courage, who committed to the cause in which they believed, gave their lives while so doing. Arise, my brave knight, and go forth!
 
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O' Be Joyful

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Awwww. :frown: I was so looking forward to having to answer mathematical problems to gain membership in the D.H. Hill Fan Club. :wink: :D
OK...but remember you asked for it. And show your work. :sneaky:

A Yankee mixes a certain number of wooden nutmegs, which cost him 1/4 cent apiece, with a quantity of real nutmegs, worth 4 cents apiece and sells the whole assortment for $44; and gains $3.75 by the fraud. How many wooden nutmegs were there?

From Elements of Algebra, by D.H. Hill, professor of mathematics at Davidson College in North Carolina
 
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lelliott19

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OK...but remember you asked for it. And show your work. :sneaky:

A Yankee mixes a certain number of wooden nutmegs, which cost him 1/4 cent apiece, with a quantity of real nutmegs, worth 4 cents apiece and sells the whole assortment for $44; and gains $3.75 by the fraud. How many wooden nutmegs were there?

From Elements of Algebra, by D.H. Hill, professor of mathematics at Davidson College in North Carolina
It's been 50 minutes. I guess @luinrina must still be working on solving the D. H. Hill math problem :giggle:
 
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