Officers of 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery

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Robert Gray

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Officers of Company B, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery.
Carte-de-visite photograph by Clement R. Edwards
Bowling Green, Kentucky
Image: Heritage Auctions

The 2nd Ohio was organized at Camp Dennison near Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky. Company B was recruited from Adams County and mustered in August 5, 1863. It mustered out August 23, 1865 at Charleston, Tennessee.

The inscription on the back reads: "Presented to Miss Han Jack by her uncle. Lieut Wick Corwin Co. B 2nd O H Arty."

Unfortunately we do not know which of the men is Lieutenant Corwin. However, the Captain seated in the middle is Philip Rothrock, who raised Company B and commanded it until his death. In an engagement on August 17, 1864 with Confederate forces under General Joseph Wheeler at Fort McPherson near Cleveland, Tennessee, Captain Rothrock was mortally wounded by the premature explosion of a shell. He was commissioned a Major on the 19th, but never mustered. He died in hospital on October 12, 1864. In November, his remains were brought to Mt. Leigh Cemetery in Adams County and reinterred. Prior to his service with the 2nd Ohio he raised and led a company with the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Lieutenant Wick Corwin transferred to Company F on April 11, 1864 and mustered out with the company in 1865.

Captain Philip Rothrock is my great, great uncle.

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Llewellyn

Private
Joined
Feb 17, 2020
Location
Britain
Officers of Company B, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery.
Carte-de-visite photograph by Clement R. Edwards
Bowling Green, Kentucky
Image: Heritage Auctions

The 2nd Ohio was organized at Camp Dennison near Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky. Company B was recruited from Adams County and mustered in August 5, 1863. It mustered out August 23, 1865 at Charleston, Tennessee.

The inscription on the back reads: "Presented to Miss Han Jack by her uncle. Lieut Wick Corwin Co. B 2nd O H Arty."

Unfortunately we do not know which of the men is Lieutenant Corwin. However, the Captain seated in the middle is Philip Rothrock, who raised Company B and commanded it until his death. In an engagement on August 17, 1864 with Confederate forces under General Joseph Wheeler at Fort McPherson near Cleveland, Tennessee, Captain Rothrock was mortally wounded by the premature explosion of a shell. He was commissioned a Major on the 19th, but never mustered. He died in hospital on October 12, 1864. In November, his remains were brought to Mt. Leigh Cemetery in Adams County and reinterred. Prior to his service with the 2nd Ohio he raised and led a company with the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Lieutenant Wick Corwin transferred to Company F on April 11, 1864 and mustered out with the company in 1865.

Captain Philip Rothrock is my great, great uncle.

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The two standing officers appear to be Second Lieutenants, so that narrows down the identification of Mr Corwin to the two officers seated either side of Captain Rothrock.
 
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Robert Gray

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
So, forgive my ignorance, but what is the difference between light artillery and heavy? Is it actual weight of the gun, or number of them in the battery.
Light Artillery were mobile and accompanied the army in the field. Heavy Artillery were trained to service the heavy guns in fixed positions such as forts, etc. Heavy Artillery were also trained to act as Infantry. In the Petersburg Campaign Grant ordered many of the Heavy Artillery troops down to his army in Virginia. Here is a photo of Heavy Artillery drilling as Infantry.

Fold3_B215_Infantry_Company_on_Parade_Mathew_B_Brady_Collection_of_Civil_War_Photographs.jpg
 
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Lubliner

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
I am very interested in some features with this photo, and need a bit of help identifying these. (Please).
First, this is a dress parade I gather from the men wearing white gloves. The photo shows approximately 40 men in two lines, and a third line nearly invisible with maybe 4. There are six Sibley (?) tents with each having a small square wooden addition. What are these? Also the men being on parade are not in front of their own encampment, but are situated in a beautifully policed area I would suppose are quarters for ranking officers. The guard gate at the bridge head? and the faithful mascot. This photo beckons my curiosity. Am I right in my suppositions? Thanks,
Lubliner.
 

Robert Gray

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
I am very interested in some features with this photo, and need a bit of help identifying these. (Please).
First, this is a dress parade I gather from the men wearing white gloves. The photo shows approximately 40 men in two lines, and a third line nearly invisible with maybe 4. There are six Sibley (?) tents with each having a small square wooden addition. What are these? Also the men being on parade are not in front of their own encampment, but are situated in a beautifully policed area I would suppose are quarters for ranking officers. The guard gate at the bridge head? and the faithful mascot. This photo beckons my curiosity. Am I right in my suppositions? Thanks,
Lubliner.
This is Captain Edward A. Gillette and Company A of the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. It was taken at Fort Reynolds, Va. in 1863. The wood structures at the Sibley tents are probably modifications to the entrances. The officers quarters are shown in the background.
 

7thWisconsin

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 21, 2014
They're in open order. The rear rank has been ordered 4 paces back from the front rank. This is to allow the inspector to walk between the ranks and facilitate handing muskets to him for inspection. Not only are they wearing white gloves, they have their shoulder scales on as well. The contrast between the company drawn up for inspection, and the 4 soldiers lounging at the left is hilarious. They're not on duty, and I'm not sure they're even aware they're in the picture. The standing sergeant of that group is doing the "only the top button of his coat buttoned" thing that reenactors like to argue about.
 
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Lubliner

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
This is Captain Edward A. Gillette and Company A of the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. It was taken at Fort Reynolds, Va. in 1863. The wood structures at the Sibley tents are probably modifications to the entrances. The officers quarters are shown in the background.
So then I should assume the tents hold maybe eight men to a tent, with their accoutrements? Also, during their normal drill sessions, are they dressed out in a less 'showy' attire? Thanks for the response.
Lubliner.
 

Robert Gray

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
So then I should assume the tents hold maybe eight men to a tent, with their accoutrements? Also, during their normal drill sessions, are they dressed out in a less 'showy' attire? Thanks for the response.
Lubliner.
Of course we don't know the occasion for this formation. It could be guard mount or an inspection. Turnout for roll call would be less formal. Only garrison troops near Washington were issued white gloves. Politicians could drop in for a visit unannounced, so they had to look sharp. Troops in the field laughed at such finery. This is closer to what Billy Yank looked like while on campaign.
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