Odds and Ends – Obscure Facts of Gettysburg Participants

Tom Elmore

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#1
Private/Sergeant Daniel A. Wood of Company G, 4th Texas, sustained a total of 11 gunshot wounds during the war, received in seven different battles. However, he passed through Gettysburg unscathed. (Confederate Military History, Extended Addition, vol. XV, Texas, p. 700; Wood’s Compiled Service Record)

During the year 1863, Private Daniel Noon Hudson of Company H, 11th Georgia marched over 1,700 miles and never missed a roll call. (Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida, p. 425)

Lieutenant Colonel Charles Conway Floweree, born in Fauquier County, Virginia on October 16, 1842, succeeded Colonel Waller T. Patton (mortally wounded on July 3) to command the 7th Virginia Infantry, though not yet 21 years old. He was reportedly the youngest colonel of either army. (Confederate Military History, Extended Addition, vol. IX, Mississippi, pp. 349-351)

Major William Thomas Poague, commanding an artillery battalion at Gettysburg, wore an overcoat that was made for General “Stonewall” Jackson, but being rather small for Jackson, Poague purchased it. Poague also used a McClellan horse saddle that was picked up on the field at Port Republic. (Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague, p. 76)

Among the horses in Lieutenant William Zimmerman’s (South Carolina) battery was “Old Charley,” a wheeler of Hamilton Owens’ team, which, though slightly wounded in almost every battle, had run the gauntlet of battle, marches and starvation from Suffolk to Spotsylvania. (David Gregg McIntosh Papers, Virginia Historical Society)

During the war, the 4th Ohio Infantry marched 1,975 miles, and traveled an additional 2,279 miles by railroad and other transport, making an aggregate of 4,254 miles. (History of Marion County, Ohio, p. 455)

Early in the war, L. H. Stevens and W. K. Newcomb of Company G, 125th New York tossed a coin to decide who would be the First Lieutenant; the loser would become the Second Lieutenant. Newcomb won the toss. Stevens served on the brigade staff of Colonel George L. Willard at Gettysburg. (Chaplain Ezra A. Simons, A Regimental History, The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, p. 109)

Second Lieutenant Benjamin N. Thomas of Company K, 44th New York, was mortally wounded defending Little Round Top on July 2; he died on July 8 and his body was reinterred at West Exeter, New York. His mother was a Doty, a direct descendant of Edward Doty, who came over in the Mayflower in 1620. (A History of the Forty-Fourth New York, by E. A. Nash, p. 416)

Lieutenant Andrew S. Bennett of the 5th Wisconsin was present at Gettysburg. After the war, then Captain Bennett with the 5th Infantry was killed in a fight with hostile Indians near Clarks Fork of the Yellowstone on September 4, 1876. (The Plainsmen of the Yellowstone: A History of the Yellowstone Basin, by Mark Herbert Brown, p. 320)

The Corporal Skelly Post of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) in Gettysburg had a small cannon, weighing 150 pounds with a bore of 1.5 inches, fashioned from one of Major Mathis Henry’s guns that had exploded during the fight. (Presumably this was a 3-inch Rifle of Capt. James Reilly’s battery, which burst prior to the Confederate infantry advance on July 2.) (History of Cumberland and Adams Counties, Pennsylvania (Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886), pp. 181-203; R. T. Coles, History of the 4th Regiment Alabama)
 

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ntsb

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#2
Interesting. Regarding the last paragraph, how could a 1.5 inch bore cannon be fashioned from a 3 inch bore cannon? Did they replace the barrel and use the old carriage?
 

Tom Elmore

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#4
Part II

All the officers and enlisted men of Company B, 14th South Carolina were from Edgefield District (county), according to a researcher. The company had 20 officers (commissioned and non-commissioned) and 127 privates. During the war it lost 23 killed in battle, 1 killed by railroad accident, 3 who died from their wounds, 17 who succumbed from disease and 5 who died in an enemy prison; total deaths – 49. (Roll of Company B, 14th South Carolina, http://www.researchonline.net/sccw/rosters/14thinfb.htm)

Captain Joseph F. Sessions, Company K, 18th Mississippi was captured at Gettysburg. He was eventually paroled for exchange and sailed for home on the steamer USS “Gettysburg” in October 1864. That vessel had previously served as a Confederate blockade runner, and after being captured on November 5, 1863 was commissioned into the U.S. Navy on May 2, 1864. (The Johnson’s Island Autograph Book of Lt. Samuel Dibble, Edisto Rifles, 25th S.C.V.; Wikipedia)

When Early’s division entered York, many men in Gordon’s brigade wore knapsacks marked 87th Pennsylvania, which produced much amusement among the people of that town, because the 87th had been recruited in York. (William H. Swallow, Early’s Division, Southern Bivouac, vol. IV, June 1885 – May 1886, Reprint, Broadfoot Publishing Company, 1993, p. 356)

First Corporal William Crawford Smith was present at Gettysburg with Company B, 12th Virginia Infantry. During the Spanish-American War, he was mustered into service as Colonel of the 1st Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He was killed near Manila in the Philippines on February 5, 1899, while leading his men forward. (Compiled Service Record of William C. Smith; https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7359489/william-crawford-smith)

Confederate 1st Lieutenant Champion G. Falligant was absent from Company H, 48th Georgia due to sickness. His grandfather, Louis Painbeouf Falligant, was decorated with the French Legion of Honor while serving as an officer under Napoleon I. Captured at Waterloo, he was discharged from confinement in England six years later. (Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida, pp. 266-267)

Union Brigadier Adolph von Steinwehr’s grandfather had fought in the Prussian army against Napoleon I. (Wikipedia)

Captain Henry Hyer Baker, Company A, 33rd North Carolina was killed on July 3. In 1861, he had enlisted as the Captain of Company E, 1st Florida Infantry. His father, James L. G. Baker, was one of seven (out of 69) delegates to vote against the Ordinance of Secession at the Florida Convention of the People in January 1861. (History of Jackson County (Florida), by J. Randall Stanley, Jackson County Historical Society, 1950; https://www.floridamemory.com/exhibits/floridahighlights/secession/)

Founded as a volunteer company of artillery in 1828, the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues saw action at Gettysburg as Captain Charles R. Grandy’s Battery, with two 3-inch Rifles and two 12-pound Howitzers (the Rifles had an effective range of just over one mile and could send off two aimed rounds in little more than a minute). After the war the unit was reestablished [1877] as a state volunteer regiment. The Blues served in France during World War I and took part in the D-Day invasion in World War II. As B Battery, 1st Battalion, 111th Field Artillery Regiment, Virginia National Guard, it participated in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The latter unit’s 105-mm Howitzers with standard ammunition can fire over seven miles at a sustained rate of three rounds per minute. (The Artilleryman, vol. 34, no. 3, summer 2013, Tunbridge, VT: Historical Publications, Inc.)

Company F of the 5th Virginia marched 173 miles between June 5 and June 30, without having a single straggler. It marched another 25 miles on July 1 to reach the field. (5th Virginia, Supplement to the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, part II, vol. 71, serial no. 83, Broadfoot Publishing Company, 1998)

Colonel William R. Peck, commanding the 9th Louisiana, weighed 330 pounds. He remained mounted throughout the battle. (Thomas Benton Reed, A Private in Gray, A/9 LA; 9 July Letter of Col. Peck to his Sister, Tennessee Virtual Archive)
 
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#5
Interesting stuff.
When Early’s division entered York, many men in Gordon’s brigade wore knapsacks marked 87th Pennsylvania, which produced much amusement among the people of that town, because the 87th had been recruited in York. (William H. Swallow, Early’s Division, Southern Bivouac, vol. IV, June 1885 – May 1886, Reprint, Broadfoot Publishing Company, 1993, p. 356)
"Amusement" isn't the emotion that I would have guessed. Shock and horror, maybe? Off whose dead bodies did you get those knapsacks??
 

JPK Huson 1863

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#6
Thanks for these! I've frequently wondered how many men came from families whose military past was lengthy. I found the Washingtons somewhere and we know all about the Custis and Lee families.

Now, finding those whose ancestors were at Waterloo would be amazing and why stop there? I'd like to see connections back to Culloden.

Col. Peck, at his weight in that heat? And the wool uniform. Misery on top of misery, poor man.
 

Tom Elmore

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#7
Thanks for these! I've frequently wondered how many men came from families whose military past was lengthy. I found the Washingtons somewhere and we know all about the Custis and Lee families.

Now, finding those whose ancestors were at Waterloo would be amazing and why stop there? I'd like to see connections back to Culloden.

Col. Peck, at his weight in that heat? And the wool uniform. Misery on top of misery, poor man.
Captain Peter Alexander Selkirk McGlashan of Company E, 50th Georgia, was a native of Edinburgh, Scotland and the son of a Waterloo veteran. He was promoted to Colonel on 31 July 1863.

Colonel Peck may have relaxed in the parlor of Mrs. William McClellan's home on the evening of July 1:
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/lo...nd-mrs-william-mcclellan.147149/#post-1838357
 
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#9
Interesting stuff.

"Amusement" isn't the emotion that I would have guessed. Shock and horror, maybe? Off whose dead bodies did you get those knapsacks??
It's likely that the men of Gordon's Brigade would have, um, "acquired" these knapsacks at Winchester. Most of the men they belonged to were probably still alive, just a bit embarrassed.
 
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#10
It's likely that the men of Gordon's Brigade would have, um, "acquired" these knapsacks at Winchester. Most of the men they belonged to were probably still alive, just a bit embarrassed.
Perhaps so but, even if they knew that, the citizens of York would still have reacted with shock and horror at the idea that most of their men were probably still alive.
 



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