Oct. 14 National Dessert Day

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
KRUMKAKE (1860's)

Traditional Norwegian crisp, cone-shaped cookie. There are many recipes, each slightly different—but all follow the same technique. My recipe comes from Stavern, Norway and my maternal grandmother—who had it from her mother’s family. It has had many alterations through the years and across the ocean

Traditionally, krumkake were made, one at a time, on stove-top irons that imprinted a pattern. However, in recent years, it has been possible to buy a special electric griddle that permits doing two cookies at a time. The hot “pancake” is then wrapped around a wood rolling cone to give it shape.

Sounds complicated to do but is dead easy.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ingredients​

4 –5 eggs
Equal Weight of flour & butter
Slightly less weight of sugar
Cardamom (the original amt. is large because it isassumed that you were pounding those little cardamom seeds—I use abt
½ tsp. Ground cardamom

Norwegian forebears also added ½ teacup of water for crispiness-I don’t (but I add 2 Tbl cornstarch for the same reason)

Directions​

Melt butter and set aside to cool.

Beat together the eggs and sugar, then add melted butter.

Work in sifted flour and cardamon (also cornstarch if you use it).

If you use a bit of water, add it now.

Heat the krumkake griddle and add the batter with a small spoon (actually, its a good idea to use two spoons: one to scoop batter and one to scrape it onto the griddle)

Close the griddle lid and let it heat up for ± 30 seconds (you’ll quickly determine a correct timing)

Once done, remove with spatula and immediately roll around a cone-shaped wooden block (or the handle of a wooden spoon).

Set aside to cool.



This recipe makes 40-50 krumkake, depending on the number of eggs and basic weight. Store in a tightly closed box.

Krumkake may be served with whipped cream & preserves (I like cloudberry jam). Americans often fill the krumkake with the cream & preserves.
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
Bumping for National Dessert day. Many desserts were enjoyed during this period.

One favorite:

Plain Ice Cream, simple and easy to make.

2 cups thin cream
6 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla flavoring
few grains of salt

Combine the ingredients. Stir until sugar dissolves and freeze. Makes 4 servings.

From "The Household Searchlight" 1920s.
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
I was given this recipe for an orange cake from the Civil War; it is attributed to a General Ogelthorpe--but I can't find such a man in either army. Well, if the creator of this cake wasn't a general, he sure deserved to be!

General Ogelthorpe's Civil War Orange Cake​
1/2 c. butter
1 c. sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp. baking soda
2 c. flour (sifted)
1 c. buttermilk
1/2 c. chopped raisins
2 ground orange peels

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cream butter, sugar and eggs. Add buttermilk. Add dry ingredients. Save juice from 2 oranges. Spread mixture in 13 x 9 x 2 inch greased pan. Bake until golden and pulls away from edges. Mix equal parts of orange juice and sugar. Pour over hot cake.
 

Mrs. V

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 5, 2017
I used to make a mixed berry compote..splash of lemon juice, enough water to cover the berries, cook until it boils. I like my berries tart. Reduce until thick. Pour into bowls and refrigerate.

1/2 C each, strawberry, raspberry, blue berry
splash lemon
1/4 C sugar or to taste.

Very simple, but good!
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
I used to make a mixed berry compote..splash of lemon juice, enough water to cover the berries, cook until it boils. I like my berries tart. Reduce until thick. Pour into bowls and refrigerate.

1/2 C each, strawberry, raspberry, blue berry
splash lemon
1/4 C sugar or to taste.

Very simple, but good!
Looks wonderful! I'll bet you could fold in some chantilly cream or custard to make a unique fool.
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
The Orange Cake is named after General Oglethorpe who is the Father of Georgia. I really don't know his connection to the cake. I tried looking up. Many bake it for Georgia festivals. Maybe a person from Georgia can give the connection.
 
Top