Notable Antebellum Slave Traders

John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
I read a bio of President James K. Polk a number of years back. It said that Polk was believed by some to have been an active slave trader, but that this was covered up when he became prominent in politics. Being an owner was considered to be reputable, but being a trader was not.
To those who were traders when they did it it was very profitable and slavery was not the issue at that time they did it. There were rich New England traders who made their wealth off this trade without having to engage in the physical transport and selling of these slaves.Being rather interesting to find the people ,men or women,who engaged in this.
Edited by Moderator.
 

W. Richardson

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Jun 29, 2011
Location
Mt. Gilead, North Carolina
Yale (of Yale University) was a big slave trader and his money funded the school. The question is whether they should change the name of the college now but say it is not going to happen.


No it should not be renamed, it should be destroyed, or moved to a more proper location, such as a museum or cemetery.
People walk by it or drive by it daily and it is offensive to them.

Respectfully,
William
Jubal A. Early - 1.jpg
 

cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Right here.
The thread title is "Notable Antebellum Slave Traders." I suppose we need to define the parameters of the Antebellum Period.

This source puts it at after the War of 1812 up to the start of the Civil War:
http://www.historynet.com/antebellum-period

So anyone before the War of 1812 or after the beginning of the Civil War would not fit the topic.
 

RobertP

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Nov 11, 2009
Location
Dallas
Here’s a neat one, from New Jersey in 1818. It’s part a long read, https://journals.psu.edu/phj/article/download/59937/59754 , but very interesting as to the slave trading that went on there in conjunction with the earlier gradual emancipation laws.

“Jacob Van Wickle sat in his Middlesex County home in the spring of 1818 with money on his mind. He realized slaves in New Jersey sold at far below the prices Mississippi and Louisiana plantation owners paid for similar chattel from the Upper South. With this knowledge Van Wickle sought to sell dozens of “cheap” New Jersey born slaves to the New Orleans market. As the ringleader of the largest slave trading organization in the Garden State, he helped undermine the promise of abolition that began in New Jersey in 1804.”

And much, much more . . .
 

cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Right here.
Here’s a neat one, from New Jersey in 1818. It’s part a long read, https://journals.psu.edu/phj/article/download/59937/59754 , but very interesting as to the slave trading that went on there in conjunction with the earlier gradual emancipation laws.

“Jacob Van Wickle sat in his Middlesex County home in the spring of 1818 with money on his mind. He realized slaves in New Jersey sold at far below the prices Mississippi and Louisiana plantation owners paid for similar chattel from the Upper South. With this knowledge Van Wickle sought to sell dozens of “cheap” New Jersey born slaves to the New Orleans market. As the ringleader of the largest slave trading organization in the Garden State, he helped undermine the promise of abolition that began in New Jersey in 1804.”

And much, much more . . .

It was things like that which led to passage of laws prohibiting the sale of slaves outside the state once the state enacted gradual emancipation.
 

saddlebum92

Private
Joined
May 11, 2016
Location
Nevada
As the article points up, there was a decided effort by New Jersey Slaveowners to circumvent the Gradual Emancipation Concept, and continue to profit in the trade. Such trade may eventually have stopped, but what did not stop was the use of rented slave gangs for agricultural work, supplied by contractors in Delaware and lower Maryland, and transported seasonally to barracoons on the Jersey side of the Delaware Bayshore, where they were farmed out to growers of produce all over New Jersey. Delaware was an odd duck. It is North of the Mason Dixon Line, but slavery was a lifeway there as much as any more southerly state.
 

Tom Elmore

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CSA Brigadier General Henry Lewis Benning had lived on an estate of more than 3,000 acres, which were worked by 89 slaves. One of these, "Old Billie," served beside Benning throughout the war, helping to nurse him whenever he was sick or wounded. (The Climactic Struggle of the 2nd and 20th Georgia)


Fort Benning is named after him.
 

NH Civil War Gal

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New Englanders, do we really want to distract from the sins of the South? :nah disagree:

We had our own sins here, and in a mighty way, contributed to the sins of the south - both are complicit in it.

Not afraid to own it but am not proud of it either.

This is from Encyclopedia.com:

"Slavery in New England came to a gradual halt. Massachusetts officially ended the practice with its 1781 constitution, which declared all men to be born free. A court case, Brom and Bett v. John Ashley, Esq., found that the document applied to blacks as well as whites. Vermont also ended slavery with its new 1777 constitution and a subsequent court decision. New Hampshire, a state with relatively few slaves and a weak antislavery movement, ended slavery legally in 1783, though the practice was not fully extinguished until about 1853. Rhode Island officially ended slavery in 1784, with the actual end of slavery coming in 1842. Connecticut outlawed slavery in 1784, with the actual end in 1848. Despite the late dates of their final ending of slavery, these states were all free in practice by 1800.

Antebellum New England also restricted the access of blacks to the housing market. In Boston, when a free black family made plans to move into a white neighborhood in the 1830s, white neighbors threatened to demolish the home rather than allow African Americans to move into the community. The term given to a black community in Boston, ****** Hill, illustrates both spatial concentration and white hostility to blacks. Housing restrictions remained in effect long after the abolition of slavery."
 

saddlebum92

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Joined
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Location
Nevada
Hope I didnt take this off-topic with that last post, but emotions still run high on the subject. Jefferson was right about the chains around a slave's neck. Two hundred YEARS later, Harry Truman was still saying the same thing. " You can put a black man in the gutter, but it will take two white men to keep him there." The Trade was a National tragedy and a Disgrace that we will never live down, all because a Dutch Sea Captain made a deal with some lazy "Gentlemen" who felt it beneath them to work for a living.
A segment of our population today still suffers from the delusions created by this trade, and another, smaller segment directly benefits from them. Even our hymns reflect some of this mythology, albeit as anti-trade. I cannot hear "Amazing Grace" without also hearing "The House Of The Rising Sun", its minor-key complement. The whole cursed Enterprise was pervasive, corrosive, corrupt and murderous.
 
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John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
We had our own sins here, and in a mighty way, contributed to the sins of the south - both are complicit in it.

Not afraid to own it but am not proud of it either.

This is from Encyclopedia.com:

"Slavery in New England came to a gradual halt. Massachusetts officially ended the practice with its 1781 constitution, which declared all men to be born free. A court case, Brom and Bett v. John Ashley, Esq., found that the document applied to blacks as well as whites. Vermont also ended slavery with its new 1777 constitution and a subsequent court decision. New Hampshire, a state with relatively few slaves and a weak antislavery movement, ended slavery legally in 1783, though the practice was not fully extinguished until about 1853. Rhode Island officially ended slavery in 1784, with the actual end of slavery coming in 1842. Connecticut outlawed slavery in 1784, with the actual end in 1848. Despite the late dates of their final ending of slavery, these states were all free in practice by 1800.

Antebellum New England also restricted the access of blacks to the housing market. In Boston, when a free black family made plans to move into a white neighborhood in the 1830s, white neighbors threatened to demolish the home rather than allow African Americans to move into the community. The term given to a black community in Boston, ****** Hill, illustrates both spatial concentration and white hostility to blacks. Housing restrictions remained in effect long after the abolition of slavery."
Thank you for acknowledging that the slave problem was not just a Southern issue .The North did not go to war at start over slavery but to save the Union then when Lincoln issued the Proclamation desertions occurred thought out the army.In fact going back the North wanted the new lands to be for Whites only THE FREESOILERS were part of this. The draft riots in New York were result of the draft after the Proclamation.No whites wanted to go to war for the slave.,that part was the Radicals who did that.If it had not been for the new Irish and the enlistment of the blacks the army due to the losses occurring due Grant's strategy was losing more than they were drafting , Lee might {SPECULATION} have endured longer or Sherman would not have had the forces to do his little demolition of the deep south. Read the early history of the South and the early days of slavery then this might clear the fact that the slavery was not an issue that was so easily dealt with over the generation.Read the social struggle they dealt with,even the founders ,read how it became a part of their social convention,dare one to go against the social and ancestral acceptance of this .A few did .Attack your own social elites and what would be the reaction,unless you overcome being ostracized and not only you but your family also.
 
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Just an FYI. The numero uno slave traders par excellance were the Portuguesa. With the Canary Islands and the Azores as jumping points they far outdid any other European country hands down. The African slave trade, east and west coast, is now considered a "Holocaust" of the first magnitude. The Portuguese were major players.

American slave traders were also famous American "heroes" like Jim Bowie, Lafite (the pirate & helper at the Battle of NO) and Alexander Hamilton of $10 fame whose. mama was not "white".

Patty Canon intrigues me the most. Trying to find more info on her. Operated on the Mason-Dixon line. Any human who wasn't white and got in her sites was bound for slavery.
I read Ron Chernow's book about Hamilton that inspired the play, and he never said Hamilton was a slave trader. I'm sure if what you say is true, he wouldn't be receiving all of the recent favorable attention. In fact, he says Hamilton was one of the most anti-slavery founders. It's true he was born illegitimately, but his mother was white according to that book. Now Chernow could be wrong I suppose, but he looks white so I'm suspicious of your claim.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
We had our own sins here, and in a mighty way, contributed to the sins of the south - both are complicit in it.

Not afraid to own it but am not proud of it either.

This is from Encyclopedia.com:

"Slavery in New England came to a gradual halt. Massachusetts officially ended the practice with its 1781 constitution, which declared all men to be born free. A court case, Brom and Bett v. John Ashley, Esq., found that the document applied to blacks as well as whites. Vermont also ended slavery with its new 1777 constitution and a subsequent court decision. New Hampshire, a state with relatively few slaves and a weak antislavery movement, ended slavery legally in 1783, though the practice was not fully extinguished until about 1853. Rhode Island officially ended slavery in 1784, with the actual end of slavery coming in 1842. Connecticut outlawed slavery in 1784, with the actual end in 1848. Despite the late dates of their final ending of slavery, these states were all free in practice by 1800.

Antebellum New England also restricted the access of blacks to the housing market. In Boston, when a free black family made plans to move into a white neighborhood in the 1830s, white neighbors threatened to demolish the home rather than allow African Americans to move into the community. The term given to a black community in Boston, ****** Hill, illustrates both spatial concentration and white hostility to blacks. Housing restrictions remained in effect long after the abolition of slavery."

They segregated about everyone by neighborhoods back then
 
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