Research Northerners who travelled South to enlist in the Confederacy?

Stiles/Akin

Sergeant Major
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Location
Atlanta, Georgia
Major William Austin Leyden of the 9th battalion Georgia Artillery was from Centre County Pennsylvania but he was living in Atlanta when the war broke out.
leyden2.jpg
 

Lusty Murfax

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Location
Northwest Missouri
I remember reading somewhere that there were a lot of transplanted Virginians who were living in southern IL at around Marion and Carbondale when the South seceded. And i remember that about a hundred of these transplanted Virginians living in southern IL went South and joined the Confederate Army.
I only know one person who grew up on a farm in southern Illinois, a DuPont chemical rep. He spoke with a distinct Southern accent.
 

Georgia Sixth

Sergeant Major
Joined
Dec 14, 2011
Location
Texas
These two made me wonder if any Northerners, particularly from New England, opposed the Union with arms rather than rhetoric and attempted to or succeeding in enlisting in the Confederacy.

After the war is interesting too. Many years ago, I had a period when I was able to work on the family tree. In pouring through tangential relations, I was amazed to see how often Federal soldiers moved to the counties here in northern Texas almost immediately after the war. In no sense did I read anything that indicated these men were regarded as carpetbaggers, but more like immigrants. They typically married local women and "plugged in" to the community. I do believe they were all Democrats. In some cases, they had cousins living here. In other cases, they served with someone who had relatives here and were intrigued. Whatever the case, they seemed to have been welcomed as equals or friends by the populace here. That said, there was a fair amount of unionist sentiment in this region, too.
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
May 4, 2015
Location
Boonville, MO.
Col. Quantrill was originally from Ohio wasn't he?
He was originally from Canal Dover, Ohio. In his very late teens he went with some other men from Canal Dover to settle in Kansas, but since he was under age he couldn't claim land there. He initially appeared to follow the "Free State" thinking and was impressed with other free state thinkers such as Sen. Lane. In the late 1850's he was employed by a freight company hauling cargo from Mo. to the Government forts in Utah, and being around Missourians, his "free State' thinking changed. He came back to Ks., taught school briefly, then was involved in stealing slaves from Mo., but then returning them to their Mo. masters for the reward. As the war approached, he finally lead a small group of abolitionists Quakers on a raid of the Morgan Walker farm in eastern Jackson Co, Mo., but informed Walker of their plans prior to the raid, and that lead to the death of the raiders, other than Quantrill, of course. Walker takes Quantrill under his protection and Quantrill now joins or help forms a local quasi militia group to protect Western Mo. slave owners against the raids of Ks. abolitionist, and after the war breaks out, that group of men, now under Quantrill's leadership, forms the nucleolus of the "Quantrill's Guerrillas."

It's interesting to note most of the men who were the guerrilla leaders that evolved out of the Quantrill Band were not Missourians. Capt. "Bloody Bill" Anderson as a child, grew up in MO., but was living with his family in KS. before the war. George Todd Was a Canadian who moved to western Missouri shortly before the war.
 

David Connon

Cadet
Joined
Aug 15, 2019
I remember reading somewhere that there were a lot of transplanted Virginians who were living in southern IL at around Marion and Carbondale when the South seceded. And i remember that about a hundred of these transplanted Virginians living in southern IL went South and joined the Confederate Army.

Hi, Historicus. Ed Gleeson wrote Illinois Rebels, in which he recounts the 34 southern Illinois residents who left en masse and enlisted in a Tennessee company. I review the book in my blog post, "Against the Flow of Northern Opinion: Illinois Rebels and Iowa Confederates." https://www.confederatesfromiowa.co...pinion-illinois-rebels-and-iowa-confederates/
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
Thank you for clarifying your original post. I was under the impression there were "Gangs". As I said I had never heard of any "Gangs".
moreb
That would be because most historians don't refer to commissioned officers of either side as gangs.

And if one was truly a gang, they had no actual affiliation to a side. Particularly Arkansas had some such gangs.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
He was originally from Canal Dover, Ohio. In his very late teens he went with some other men from Canal Dover to settle in Kansas, but since he was under age he couldn't claim land there. He initially appeared to follow the "Free State" thinking and was impressed with other free state thinkers such as Sen. Lane. In the late 1850's he was employed by a freight company hauling cargo from Mo. to the Government forts in Utah, and being around Missourians, his "free State' thinking changed. He came back to Ks., taught school briefly, then was involved in stealing slaves from Mo., but then returning them to their Mo. masters for the reward. As the war approached, he finally lead a small group of abolitionists Quakers on a raid of the Morgan Walker farm in eastern Jackson Co, Mo., but informed Walker of their plans prior to the raid, and that lead to the death of the raiders, other than Quantrill, of course. Walker takes Quantrill under his protection and Quantrill now joins or help forms a local quasi militia group to protect Western Mo. slave owners against the raids of Ks. abolitionist, and after the war breaks out, that group of men, now under Quantrill's leadership, forms the nucleolus of the "Quantrill's Guerrillas."

It's interesting to note most of the men who were the guerrilla leaders that evolved out of the Quantrill Band were not Missourians. Capt. "Bloody Bill" Anderson as a child, grew up in MO., but was living with his family in KS. before the war. George Todd Was a Canadian who moved to western Missouri shortly before the war.
Not really surprising, few Missourians would be native

In 1820 pop was 66,586, yr later statehood

1840-383,702
1850-682,044
1860-1,182,012

So at time of ACW almost 1/2 Missourians hadn't been here 10yrs, almost 3/4 not 20 years.

If going by birth, Gen Price was a Virginian and Gen Frank Blair a Kentuckian.....Gov Jackson a Kentuckian and Union appointed Gov Gamble a Virginian.......Virginia and Kentucky did contribute heavily to the settlers here.
 

Biscoitos

Corporal
Joined
May 14, 2020
I've been wondering if there are any examples of this for a while.
I learned of two individuals from my State who at the very least opposed the Union's role in the war verbally; Lysander Spooner, an abolitionist who compared the Union's effort to stop Southern secession to a master's effort to stop the freeing of his slaves, and Ambrose L. Kimball, an Essex County journalist who openly voiced that he felt the Lincoln administration's policies and efforts were contradictory to the ideals of the Founding Fathers, which resulting in him getting tarred, feathered and essentially chased to Iowa.
These two made me wonder if any Northerners, particularly from New England, opposed the Union with arms rather than rhetoric and attempted to or succeeding in enlisting in the Confederacy.

I'm aware of at least John Clifford Pemberton from Pennsylvania doing as such, however he was a General and I'm more interested in lower ranks, particularly those who would enlist as Privates.
Northerners who were caught attempting to join or aid the Confederacy would also be of interest.
There is a book or long booklet published by the Naval Historical Society titled Going South, U.S. Navy Officer Resignations & Dismissals On the Eve of the Civil War.

The percentage of US Navy officers who "went South" was significantly higher than in the US Army.
 

Rio Bravo

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 6, 2013
Location
Suffolk, U.K.
Hi, Historicus. Ed Gleeson wrote Illinois Rebels, in which he recounts the 34 southern Illinois residents who left en masse and enlisted in a Tennessee company. I review the book in my blog post, "Against the Flow of Northern Opinion: Illinois Rebels and Iowa Confederates." https://www.confederatesfromiowa.co...pinion-illinois-rebels-and-iowa-confederates/
There were also quite a large amount of desertions from Illinois Regts / defections to the South.
In fact 860 Men from the 128th Illinois deserted en masse !
 

Gettysburg Guide #154

Sergeant
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Why did the four men from Gettysburg go south?
Actually there were 5. Four of them were engaged in the trade of carriage making for the C. W. Hoffman company. They moved when their employer moved to Virginia. Three of of these four were C. W.'s sons. The fourth was J. Wesley Culp’s, who would become the only fatal casualty of the 2d Virginia Infantry Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg. It appears that Culp’s visited with his sisters in town one night during the battle. The fifth is Henry Wentz, whose parents home was just south of Gettysburg on Emmittsburg Road. He also moved to pursue the carriage making (although he listed his occupation as house painter in the 1860 census). Wentz moved to Martinsburg, Virginia (which by the time the battle became West Virginia). Wentz's artillery battery fired in the general direction of his Father's house during the second day.
 
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