Northerners Mourn Confederate Losses; Humanity In The Shambles Of War

JPK Huson 1863

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Pittsburg Daily Post, Christmas Day, 1867- Cont'd below

Posted previously on commerce v Confederate- and indeed many Union dead at Gettysburg. Despite Lincoln's November, 1863 seal on our National Cemetery it was not until well into 1864 David Wills felt satisfied Union dead had been reinterred there. 1870 until Dr. Rufus Weaver spearheaded the massive effort, funded by Southern families, to begin removing and sending home men who had lain in mass graves, trenches, now mounds on the battlefield. By then, David McCaughy ( of ' Bury 'em quick, Elizabeth, before another cemetery gets to charge the government for them ', fame ) had built a hotel and attempted a rather glitzy, officers-only, 1869 reunion there- mercifully ill attended.

But. This inaction was not unnoticed or popular. That Sickle's leg received more post mortem attention than Confederate dead? ( sorry, I said that but it seems the general sense of frustration ) I'll only post one letter, of many, the most striking because it includes sentiments at Antietam- Maryland's answer to war's ugliest face.


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The War Department should indeed have taken a hand No historian, I do know the 2nd Battle of Gettysburg was over greed- who would control the tourist dollars. It took place beginning July 4th, 1863. With an army at its disposal you'd have ' thunk ' the War Department would have won, v. commerce. Did anyone make the attempt, in the early scramble? No idea. At the least, newspapers show families of the North inclined to bring shovels themselves, and take men home.
 

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Cavalry Charger

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Thanks for sharing @JPK Huson 1863 . This article certainly gives some insight into the desire, and moves to promote a more respectful burial of the Confederate dead. I find it hard to think of them other than American, just like the boys in blue, but that's probably because we are a long way past the war now...it was probably different directly after the war, when levels of animosity ran high. Still, disrespecting the dead is troublesome to me...
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Thanks for sharing @JPK Huson 1863 . This article certainly gives some insight into the desire, and moves to promote a more respectful burial of the Confederate dead. I find it hard to think of them other than American, just like the boys in blue, but that's probably because we are a long way past the war now...it was probably different directly after the war, when levels of animosity ran high. Still, disrespecting the dead is troublesome to me...

This sentiment was attacked- and the paper printed it. The usual outrage along with ' traitors ', etc. It seems to have found little support. I speak mostly of Gettysburg because I'm most familiar with it- live fairly close to it and the battle looms large in family history. JPK died there, opposite Barksdale's unbelievably courageous, nearly unstoppable Mississippians. Northern sentiment by civilians seems typical, at least those touched by war. I've read only a few out of hundreds of accounts where some medical person turned a back on Confederate wounded. Only one nurse- and I was a little surprised she nursed anyone. Seemed a little witchy to me.

The Bayly family took in an exhausted, young Confederate soldier. He honestly was not deserting his cause- just a terrified, too-young, overwhelmed kid who sought comfort. He stayed, grew up and bought the farm next to theirs. A group of Confederate soldiers were bullying a man, father of a family, to open his business. He persisted in saying no- it got loud. His young, pretty daughter showed up. These Southern men transformed into gentlemen and left. Civilian, normal life was a factor in the midst of this shambles.

Gettysburg citizens owned the farms where thousands of men lay buried. There really was an outcry of compassion. Men with tourist money on their minds had different agendas.

Here's a hint- one of the money men, a jack of all, er, well- something. " Bury 'Em Quick Mac " You see ' claims against the government in Washington, DC? Churches in Gettysburg split a total of $500 bucks, from the government, for damages- blood soaked pews and floors- they were hospitals. This guy was building a hotel. What hospital?
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