Northeast GA; Laurens & Columbia SC; Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania; and Chickamauga Civil War Adventure 2020

lelliott19

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Thank you so much for the informative virtual tour and taking us along!
I have a feeling Day 3 is the one you will be most interested in. We visited the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum. They have a fantastic collection and it is exhibited the way relics should be exhibited - in low lighted cases, with simple identifications. There are no large scale, wall-mounted image boards to detract/distract from the relics on display. We enjoyed seeing all the items and Joe Long, Curator of Education, was on hand to answer our questions.

There was one particular gun I wanted to see there. Scroll down - I'm going to need some help from you, @Lanyard Puller @ucvrelics @Craig L Barry or anyone else who may be able to tell.:D
SC Relic Room.jpg

South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum (Columbia, SC)
After visiting in Laurens on the second day, we drove the short distance to Columbia. It was too late to visit the Relic Room that day, so we checked in a hotel, got takeout from Texas Roadhouse and ate in our room. The next morning we were off to the Relic Room. The museum is separate, but located inside the South Carolina State Museum.
SC relic room Martin Guards flag.jpg

Since we had just been to Laurens, I took a picture of this flag of the Martin Guards, presented by the Ladies of Laurens. The inscription at the top Animis Opibusque Parati -- prepared in minds and resources. The Martin Guards organized in July 1861 became Company A, 13th South Carolina. They were ordered to Virginia in April 1862 and, at Second Manassas, served in Maxey Gregg's brigade, A P Hill's Division. Gregg was killed at the Battle of Fredericksburg and the brigade was thereafter commanded by BG Samuel McGowan until it was surrendered at Appomattox Court House.
SC relic room knapsack.jpg

Next, I couldn't resist taking a picture of this S Isaac, Campbell and Co knapsack. This one belonged to William S Dogan who served in the Ordnance Dept. at Richmond. Judging by the condition it's in, it must not have seen a whole lot of field use? Maybe Dogan sent it home early on, realizing he would have little need for it?
SC relic room carbine.jpg

You just had to know I couldn't visit a museum full of Civil War exhibits and not take any pictures of the Enfields. :nah disagree: Unfortunately, I cut off the top of the description of this Model 1856 Enfield cavalry carbine belonging to J A Brown of Co H 5th South Carolina Cavalry. This fine Enfield, and the trooper who carried it, reportedly saw action along the coast, at Cold Harbor, Trevillian Station, and Bentonville.

And here it is! The one I wanted to see. Unfortunately, it was suspended in a 8 foot by 8 foot glass case so the closest I could get to it was about 4 feet.....no matter how hard I tried to get closer.
SC relic room Kirkland rifle.jpg

This is the rifle reported to have belonged to Sgt Richard Rowland Kirkland, The Angel of Marye's Heights. Unfortunately, back when it was donated to the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum many years ago, there was not much effort to document donations. The donor was an old soldier who from Kershaw's brigade who claimed to have picked it up on the battlefield at Chickamauga. Perhaps he exchanged his damaged rifle for Kirkland's after Kirkland was shot? Or perhaps he had a three-band Enfield and gathered up Kirkland's more desirable two band? However it was obtained, the old soldier donated it as Kirkland's rifle - the one he was using at Chickamauga when he was shot. According to Joe Long, the Curator of Education at the SC Relic Room, the initials RK (or perhaps RRK) are crudely engraved into the stock. Unfortunately this is as close to it as I could get.
SC relic room Kirkland rifle other side.jpg

No matter how hard I tried, I could not make out the initials on the stock. Or the markings on the lockplate. :nah disagree:
SC relic room Kirkland lockplate.jpg
@Lanyard Puller @Package4 @ucvrelics @Craig L Barry or anyone else. Can anyone tell from these pictures if it's a P1860, P1861, P1856, P1858, or what from these pictures? I think its a P1858 aka P1856 No 2 "Bar on Band", but as you all know, I am not well-versed.

Here's some enlarged versions of the same pictures
1604551194846.png

1604551637359.png

1604551268352.png

And enlarged pictures of the other side
1604551354059.png

1604551454010.png
 

Georgia

Sergeant
I have a feeling Day 3 is the one you will be most interested in. We visited the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum. They have a fantastic collection and it is exhibited the way relics should be exhibited - in low lighted cases, with simple identifications. There are no large scale, wall-mounted image boards to detract/distract from the relics on display. We enjoyed seeing all the items and Joe Long, Curator of Education, was on hand to answer our questions.

There was one particular gun I wanted to see there. Scroll down - I'm going to need some help from you, @Lanyard Puller @ucvrelics @Craig L Barry or anyone else who may be able to tell.:D
View attachment 380761
South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum (Columbia, SC)
After visiting in Laurens on the second day, we drove the short distance to Columbia. It was too late to visit the Relic Room that day, so we checked in a hotel, got takeout from Texas Roadhouse and ate in our room. The next morning we were off to the Relic Room. The museum is separate, but located inside the South Carolina State Museum.
View attachment 380762
Since we had just been to Laurens, I took a picture of this flag of the Martin Guards, presented by the Ladies of Laurens. The inscription at the top Animis Opibusque Parati -- prepared in minds and resources. The Martin Guards organized in July 1861 became Company A, 13th South Carolina. They were ordered to Virginia in April 1862 and, at Second Manassas, served in Maxey Gregg's brigade, A P Hill's Division. Gregg was killed at the Battle of Fredericksburg and the brigade was thereafter commanded by BG Samuel McGowan until it was surrendered at Appomattox Court House.
View attachment 380763
Next, I couldn't resist taking a picture of this S Isaac, Campbell and Co knapsack. This one belonged to William S Dogan who served in the Ordnance Dept. at Richmond. Judging by the condition it's in, it must not have seen a whole lot of field use? Maybe Dogan sent it home early on, realizing he would have little need for it?
View attachment 380765
You just had to know I couldn't visit a museum full of Civil War exhibits and not take any pictures of the Enfields. :nah disagree: Unfortunately, I cut off the top of the description of this Model 1856 Enfield cavalry carbine belonging to J A Brown of Co H 5th South Carolina Cavalry. This fine Enfield, and the trooper who carried it, reportedly saw action along the coast, at Cold Harbor, Trevillian Station, and Bentonville.

And here it is! The one I wanted to see. Unfortunately, it was suspended in a 8 foot by 8 foot glass case so the closest I could get to it was about 4 feet.....no matter how hard I tried to get closer. View attachment 380764
This is the rifle reported to have belonged to Sgt Richard Rowland Kirkland, The Angel of Marye's Heights. Unfortunately, back when it was donated to the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum many years ago, there was not much effort to document donations. The donor was an old soldier who from Kershaw's brigade who claimed to have picked it up on the battlefield at Chickamauga. Perhaps he exchanged his damaged rifle for Kirkland's after Kirkland was shot? Or perhaps he had a three-band Enfield and gathered up Kirkland's more desirable two band? However it was obtained, the old soldier donated it as Kirkland's rifle - the one he was using at Chickamauga when he was shot. According to Joe Long, the Curator of Education at the SC Relic Room, the initials RK (or perhaps RRK) are crudely engraved into the stock. Unfortunately this is as close to it as I could get.
View attachment 380766
No matter how hard I tried, I could not make out the initials on the stock. Or the markings on the lockplate. :nah disagree:
View attachment 380767@Lanyard Puller @Package4 @ucvrelics @Craig L Barry or anyone else. Can anyone tell if it's a M1861, M1856, M1858, or what from these pictures?

Here's some enlarged versions of the same pictures
View attachment 380770
View attachment 380774
View attachment 380771
And enlarged pictures of the other side
View attachment 380772
View attachment 380773
So sorry you couldn’t get close enough to really examine as well as you wished. Would this museum location possibly offer one on one time with you, a curator and the rifle? I’m learning that many locations will honor such requests if asked- maybe before you visit the museum again, write or call and ask if it would be an option based on your interests and could they accommodate your request before opening or right after closing times.
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
I have a feeling Day 3 is the one you will be most interested in. We visited the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum. They have a fantastic collection and it is exhibited the way relics should be exhibited - in low lighted cases, with simple identifications. There are no large scale, wall-mounted image boards to detract/distract from the relics on display. We enjoyed seeing all the items and Joe Long, Curator of Education, was on hand to answer our questions.

There was one particular gun I wanted to see there. Scroll down - I'm going to need some help from you, @Lanyard Puller @ucvrelics @Craig L Barry or anyone else who may be able to tell.:D
View attachment 380761
South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum (Columbia, SC)
After visiting in Laurens on the second day, we drove the short distance to Columbia. It was too late to visit the Relic Room that day, so we checked in a hotel, got takeout from Texas Roadhouse and ate in our room. The next morning we were off to the Relic Room. The museum is separate, but located inside the South Carolina State Museum.
View attachment 380762
Since we had just been to Laurens, I took a picture of this flag of the Martin Guards, presented by the Ladies of Laurens. The inscription at the top Animis Opibusque Parati -- prepared in minds and resources. The Martin Guards organized in July 1861 became Company A, 13th South Carolina. They were ordered to Virginia in April 1862 and, at Second Manassas, served in Maxey Gregg's brigade, A P Hill's Division. Gregg was killed at the Battle of Fredericksburg and the brigade was thereafter commanded by BG Samuel McGowan until it was surrendered at Appomattox Court House.
View attachment 380763
Next, I couldn't resist taking a picture of this S Isaac, Campbell and Co knapsack. This one belonged to William S Dogan who served in the Ordnance Dept. at Richmond. Judging by the condition it's in, it must not have seen a whole lot of field use? Maybe Dogan sent it home early on, realizing he would have little need for it?
View attachment 380765
You just had to know I couldn't visit a museum full of Civil War exhibits and not take any pictures of the Enfields. :nah disagree: Unfortunately, I cut off the top of the description of this Model 1856 Enfield cavalry carbine belonging to J A Brown of Co H 5th South Carolina Cavalry. This fine Enfield, and the trooper who carried it, reportedly saw action along the coast, at Cold Harbor, Trevillian Station, and Bentonville.

And here it is! The one I wanted to see. Unfortunately, it was suspended in a 8 foot by 8 foot glass case so the closest I could get to it was about 4 feet.....no matter how hard I tried to get closer. View attachment 380764
This is the rifle reported to have belonged to Sgt Richard Rowland Kirkland, The Angel of Marye's Heights. Unfortunately, back when it was donated to the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum many years ago, there was not much effort to document donations. The donor was an old soldier who from Kershaw's brigade who claimed to have picked it up on the battlefield at Chickamauga. Perhaps he exchanged his damaged rifle for Kirkland's after Kirkland was shot? Or perhaps he had a three-band Enfield and gathered up Kirkland's more desirable two band? However it was obtained, the old soldier donated it as Kirkland's rifle - the one he was using at Chickamauga when he was shot. According to Joe Long, the Curator of Education at the SC Relic Room, the initials RK (or perhaps RRK) are crudely engraved into the stock. Unfortunately this is as close to it as I could get.
View attachment 380766
No matter how hard I tried, I could not make out the initials on the stock. Or the markings on the lockplate. :nah disagree:
View attachment 380767@Lanyard Puller @Package4 @ucvrelics @Craig L Barry or anyone else. Can anyone tell from these pictures if it's a P1860, P1861, P1856, P1858, or what from these pictures? I think its a P1858 aka P1856 No 2 "Bar on Band", but as you all know, I am not well-versed.

Here's some enlarged versions of the same pictures
View attachment 380770
View attachment 380774
View attachment 380771
And enlarged pictures of the other side
View attachment 380772
View attachment 380773
From what ai can tell it is a Confederate imported British Pattern1856 No 2 Iron Mounted bar on band Short Rifle. These rifles are also sometimes referred to as P-1858 Rifles, but this is can be confused with the P-1858 Naval Rifle, so knowledgeable collectors prefer the “No 2” designation. I will certainly defer to @Lanyard Puller who has a room full of these.
 

Lanyard Puller

Sergeant
Joined
Nov 29, 2017
Location
South Carolina
The rifle in question is a Pattern 1856 Type 2, Bar-on-Band. I have seen this rifle and feel the lock was replaced sometime during it's life, but the ID is solid.

"BoB" because the bayonet lug {bar} is on the side of the top band, rather than on the barrel. The bayonet ,at first glance, appears to be a standard P56 sabre, but the barrel ring is raised about 1/4 inch from the hilt to allow for the thickness of the barrel band.

I wish I did have a room of them, @Package4, but they are one of the rarer CS models {along with Artillery carbines} and I can only claim a few. 👍

The CRR&MM is also the home of the fantastic Corky Huey Collection of CS weapons, focused on Enfields. Unfortunately their display space is limited. Their staff have visited my home to wade through my collection and they retain the "Old" museum philosophy of displaying their goodies. I help there with loans for special theme displays whenever asked, and I'm proud to be a "General" in the category of contributors there.
 

lelliott19

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Thanks for your reply LP.
feel the lock was replaced sometime during it's life,
So is it now a plain lock? Do you happen to recall any more of the circumstances? Like who donated it? Since I cant imagine anyone carrying around two rifles, I assume that the donor used the gun for the rest of his service?
they retain the "Old" museum philosophy of displaying their goodies.
That's exactly what we loved about it! A whole lot of great CW military items, exhibited in a way that makes them interesting to look at. None of those full-wall interpretive image boards that detract from the exhibition of actual items. Some museums like the ACWM in Richmond have so many of those giant image boards that they barely have any actual items on display. If I want to see billboard ads about the CW, I can find plenty of compelling stories with pictures in books, on the internet, etc. I go to museums to see the collection not boards.
I'm proud to be a "General" in the category of contributors there.
Thanks you sir for helping to ensure that the collection remains available for all to see. It's a great museum!
 

War Horse

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Quartermaster Gettysburg 2017
Joined
Sep 4, 2014
Location
Lexington, SC
View attachment 380693
Laurens County Courthouse creative commons
Laurens, SC
We spent the second day of our trip at Laurens SC - birthplace of William Preston Hix. In case you have never heard of William Preston Hix, he was a South Carolina photographer and portrait artist who served for 8 or 9 months in Company A, 3rd South Carolina, Kershaw's brigade. Here is one of Hix's photographs from LOC.
View attachment 380690
Among William Preston Hix's paintings: an oil-on-canvas entitled "The Women of the South Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead" (1866); a portrait of Maj Gen Matthew C Butler (1871); a full-length post-war portrait of PGT Beauregard; a portrait of Brigadier General John S Preston in the South Carolina State House; and a full length, life-size portrait of Joseph B Kershaw (1873; wearing Confederate uniform; collection of the Virginia Museum of History and Culture.)
View attachment 380696
Richard Rowland Kirkland - The Angel of Marye's Heights from Find A Grave
Today, Hix's art is virtually unknown to most Americans, but he made another important contribution to history related to the Angel of Marye's Heights. William Preston Hix's 1874 recollection of Richard Rowland Kirkland's heroic aid to wounded Federals between the lines at the Battle of Fredericksburg was the first published account of that incident. A few months ago, it was the subject of my first published Civil War article.
View attachment 380698
The oldest house in Laurens, SC, the house where William Preston Hix was born and lived with his family is today, home to the Mayor of Laurens. He generously offered to show us the house and even allowed us to go underneath to see the construction (hand hewn timbers, pegged with railroad spike sized wooden pegs.) It was probably built between 1830 and 1840.
View attachment 380699
Another set of double pine doors that perfectly match the front doors were found in the attic - apparently they used to be on the back end of the center hall.
View attachment 380700
Interestingly, the Mayor is also an artist and he gave us a print of his painting of the Laurens County Court House, as well as a piece of flow blue pottery - a relic that he excavated from under the house.
View attachment 380697
We also had a chance to see the new Laurens County museum building. It is an old commercial building on the courthouse square that is being transformed into a state of the art museum space. @War Horse this will be of interest to you.

Thanks for looking. Stay tuned for pictures of some great items from the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum, which we visited on the third day.
That’s very interesting. I’ll have to make my way there. Thank for sharing.
 
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