Discussion Non Military Period Tin/Ambrotypes

CyleKostello

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Jan 27, 2021
Location
Boston Mass/ Seattle Wa
Hi all!

An antique store near me was selling this lot of 9 tin/ambrotypes for 100$. I picked up the lot mostly for the Yankee image (see last attached photo) in the patriotic case.

Was wondering if there was any value in the non military examples?

thanks in advance!

the attached photos are some of the pictures that came in the lot

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D96CEC95-1936-446E-B8EE-62CF9D2A4306.jpeg


40E2E8B0-DD82-4897-A92F-61F0CA6D4E3D.jpeg


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DAC12C58-A722-46F2-9D26-73126ED0CCB6.jpeg


765EC4AE-67C0-4945-99C5-1C9843970C76.jpeg
 

1867crete

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Feb 25, 2017
I think you did good! I would have bought them. The uniformed image is the pick of that litter! But even the more common images are cool! They make a great display, haversack stuffer and or home front. I like them good score! Thanks for sharing!
 

CyleKostello

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Location
Boston Mass/ Seattle Wa
I think you did good! I would have bought them. The uniformed image is the pick of that litter! But even the more common images are cool! They make a great display, haversack stuffer and or home front. I like them good score! Thanks for sharing!
Thanks! Figured it was hard to go wrong at 100$ for the lot. I do enjoy the little glimpse at the average person of the era
 

steamboater

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A very nice image of the Yank! I note the brass mat is downside up, or is it upside down? No matter, you can rotate the mat 180 degrees at the time you replace the broken protective cover glass.

What is showing sticking out from his waist belt, the hilt of a prewar sword, or a cutlery hilted personal knife?
 

CyleKostello

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Boston Mass/ Seattle Wa
A very nice image of the Yank! I note the brass mat is downside up, or is it upside down? No matter, you can rotate the mat 180 degrees at the time you replace the broken protective cover glass.

What is showing sticking out from his waist belt, the hilt of a prewar sword, or a cutlery hilted personal knife?
Haha I noticed that as well! Seems the photographer was in a bit of a hurry! No idea what’s stuck in his belt however.
 

LCYingling3rd

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Apr 25, 2021
Yes, I agree that the soldier picture is well worth the purchase. And yes, the glass can be easily replaced (probably with glass from one of the other not so good cased images of the same size?). And yes, rotate the mat when doing so.

However, I would say that some of the other images are quite nice. There are people who like non-military images. Even with the brown spot of foxing dead center, the child in the white dress is nice. The "can we get this over with" expression is priceless. I have seen images like that get $15 to $25 retail. The Little boy has a darling outfit and should be an easy $25 to $35 retail. The dapper gentleman and the woman in the bonnet is an excellent image. I would say pre-war from the clothing and it appears to actually be a daguerreotype. The image looks mirror-like to me? If it is, an image like that can retail for $45 to $65 fairly easily. So, just in those three I think you are looking at $85 to $125 in retail value. The very spotted old white haired gentleman is a parts piece for the mat and case. The woman with the white collar and bonnet (lower right, behind your dapper couple image) and the man in the dark suit with the white cravat that you are holding in the second image are decent but certainly dime a dozen images. I see them get $10 to $20 sometimes.

I didn't see the other three images too well, but the one damaged woman image in the background of the second image isn't worth anything. But I think you did excellent! You could maybe sell the five I talked about to a dealer for like $75 and you got yourself an great soldier image for $25! Or keep them because they are cool historical images...I do like the dapper couple image. If it is a daguerreotype you have yourself a nice example of early photography.

The Daguerreotype is the first form of photography; introduced in Paris by Louis Daguerre in 1839. So, you may have a nice example of the very first photographic process. The three primary forms of early photography are; the Daguerreotype which is an image on a copper plate coated with silver which gives it a mirror-like look. A little later came the ambrotype which is an image on a glass plate; it is actually a negative image that looks positive against the black background of the case. And later came the cheaper tintype, which is, well, an image on a tin plate.
 

CyleKostello

Private
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Location
Boston Mass/ Seattle Wa
Yes, I agree that the soldier picture is well worth the purchase. And yes, the glass can be easily replaced (probably with glass from one of the other not so good cased images of the same size?). And yes, rotate the mat when doing so.

However, I would say that some of the other images are quite nice. There are people who like non-military images. Even with the brown spot of foxing dead center, the child in the white dress is nice. The "can we get this over with" expression is priceless. I have seen images like that get $15 to $25 retail. The Little boy has a darling outfit and should be an easy $25 to $35 retail. The dapper gentleman and the woman in the bonnet is an excellent image. I would say pre-war from the clothing and it appears to actually be a daguerreotype. The image looks mirror-like to me? If it is, an image like that can retail for $45 to $65 fairly easily. So, just in those three I think you are looking at $85 to $125 in retail value. The very spotted old white haired gentleman is a parts piece for the mat and case. The woman with the white collar and bonnet (lower right, behind your dapper couple image) and the man in the dark suit with the white cravat that you are holding in the second image are decent but certainly dime a dozen images. I see them get $10 to $20 sometimes.

I didn't see the other three images too well, but the one damaged woman image in the background of the second image isn't worth anything. But I think you did excellent! You could maybe sell the five I talked about to a dealer for like $75 and you got yourself an great soldier image for $25! Or keep them because they are cool historical images...I do like the dapper couple image. If it is a daguerreotype you have yourself a nice example of early photography.

The Daguerreotype is the first form of photography; introduced in Paris by Louis Daguerre in 1839. So, you may have a nice example of the very first photographic process. The three primary forms of early photography are; the Daguerreotype which is an image on a copper plate coated with silver which gives it a mirror-like look. A little later came the ambrotype which is an image on a glass plate; it is actually a negative image that looks positive against the black background of the case. And later came the cheaper tintype, which is, well, an image on a tin plate.
Thank you so much for the detailed write up! Lots of very helpful info. Love that couple daguerreotype. Not sure if it shows in my photo but their rings were hand tinted.

So far as replacing the glass on the soldier image goes. Are there any tutorials on how to disassemble one of these? I’m always loathe to mess with any of my antiques for fear of damaging them.

Got a laugh out of your description of the girl’s “can we get it over with expression”. Seems like that face is timeless, as I’m sure my mom and dad have pics of me making the same face!
 

James N.

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Thank you so much for the detailed write up! Lots of very helpful info. Love that couple daguerreotype. Not sure if it shows in my photo but their rings were hand tinted.

So far as replacing the glass on the soldier image goes. Are there any tutorials on how to disassemble one of these? I’m always loathe to mess with any of my antiques for fear of damaging them.
Personally it doesn't look to me like you'll have any trouble making the change, but you might like to take a look at my old thread on the subject - be sure to scroll through the entire thread, not just the OP:

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/my-first-tintype-and-a-warning.90795/
 

CyleKostello

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Personally it doesn't look to me like you'll have any trouble making the change, but you might like to take a look at my old thread on the subject - be sure to scroll through the entire thread, not just the OP:

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/my-first-tintype-and-a-warning.90795/
Thanks for the thread! Helpful read.
It breaks my heart to think that these have been separated from their families. No criticism meant to you @CyleKostello - that happened long before you saw them for sale. But when I think of the number of times I have wished for photos of ancestors....
Totally get what you're saying. Interesting to think how these photos ended up at shop in palm springs, a town that didn't exist until long, long after the war.
 

LCYingling3rd

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Apr 25, 2021
Thank you so much for the detailed write up! Lots of very helpful info. Love that couple daguerreotype. Not sure if it shows in my photo but their rings were hand tinted.

So far as replacing the glass on the soldier image goes. Are there any tutorials on how to disassemble one of these? I’m always loathe to mess with any of my antiques for fear of damaging them.

Got a laugh out of your description of the girl’s “can we get it over with expression”. Seems like that face is timeless, as I’m sure my mom and dad have pics of me making the same face!
I am not sure if there are any tutorials? We can check on Youtube where there are tutorials for almost anything! LOL You are correct to be very careful; damage can certainly be done. I have disassembled cases for years and it is tricky. I started on images that were not good to experiment. If you want to be safe maybe you could take them to a reputable dealer for instruction or to have them do it? The mats are thin and can be damaged. I have a tool I use that is extremely thin but sturdy. I have a tintype image of a soldier from the 133rd NY holding his rifle which I disassembled to inspect for condition and discovered that there was a dog curled up next to him in the image that was hidden. That was pretty cool. Sorry I can't be of more help.
 

LCYingling3rd

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Apr 25, 2021
It breaks my heart to think that these have been separated from their families. No criticism meant to you @CyleKostello - that happened long before you saw them for sale. But when I think of the number of times I have wished for photos of ancestors....
So true. I have been collecting and dealing in antiques and collectibles since the 80's and it always breaks my heart that some family members have no interest in their heritage. It not only bothers me when I see family photos for sale, but hand written letters too. It drives me crazy. I have always put the word out to relatives that I would love any photos or letters they aren't interested in. I would buy them if I had to. I have picked up shoeboxes filled with letters for next to nothing and treasure them. Not only is letter writing becoming a lost art with all the social media and computer emails, they are often the best window into the hearts and minds of our ancestors. I read the letters of families I don't know and can't imagine relatives are not interested in the fascinating stories in them.

I was just down visiting my mom and we had a grand time reading her parents letters from the 1920's. It was wonderful. My grandmother had gotten her teaching degree from Shepherd College in Shepherdstown, WV and was out in Morgantown taking some classes at U of WV and my grandfather told her he didn't want her to become one of those flappers. They worried him. It was tongue in cheek and really funny. Her name was Virginia and he called her "Giggs" when they were dating. It was such a window into their lives that I never knew. She was an old lady when I knew her (like, you know, ten or fifteen years younger than I am now! LOL). And tell everyone...when going through old pictures with your parents or grandparents, write who they are and how they are related in pencil on the backs!!!
 

CyleKostello

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Boston Mass/ Seattle Wa
tell everyone...when going through old pictures with your parents or grandparents, write who they are and how they are related in pencil on the backs!!!
funny you said this, looks like the family of the cravat wearing gent took your advice! Looks like he was the owners grand(?) uncle William Collar (maybe?)

also managed to successfully swap out the glass and flip the frame on the Yankee image. Thanks for the help!

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lupaglupa

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funny you said this, looks like the family of the cravat wearing gent took your advice! Looks like he was the owners grand(?) uncle William Collar (maybe?)

also managed to successfully swap out the glass and flip the frame on the Yankee image. Thanks for the help!

View attachment 407911

View attachment 407912
Now we need to identify him. Maybe start a new post in the Researching Civil War Records and Ancestry forum
 
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