No Time Now to Talk of Fatigue: Doles' Georgia Brigade at Gettysburg

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lelliott19

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In his official report of the Battle of Gettysburg, Brigadier General George Pierce Doles credits his July 1, 1863 success to his subordinates, listing them by name. It seems that Doles himself deserves some of that credit. On that day, Doles' brigade, comprised of the 4th, 44th, 12th, and 21st Georgia regiments, was the extreme left of the of the Confederate line. When Barlow's Division threatened the left flank of his brigade, Doles executed a wheel to face the threat. He joined in the attack by Gordon's brigade - without waiting for orders. He tackled the 2nd brigade 3rd Division (Krzyzanowski's) and drove it from the field, despite having only 3/4 of his 1300 men in position to participate. When the 157th NY threatened his right flank, Doles successfully executed a change of front - changing the front of two regiments 90 degrees and moving the left regiment to the extreme right of the brigade. As far as is known, Doles never called for reinforcements.

It's important to note that Doles had no formal military training - he was the son of a tailor, and at the outbreak of the war, was working as a bookkeeper. And yet, these technical maneuvers, which would have proved difficult under the best circumstances, seem to have been flawlessly executed. Of Doles' performance that day, GNP Ranger Matt Atkinson wrote: "....possibly no brigadier general distinguished himself on July 1, 1863, more than George Doles."

Doles brigade sustained 219 casualties of 1323 brought into the fight or 16%. Lt. Thomas M. Hightower (D/21GA) explained the low casualty rate this way: “The reason was that we routed them at the beginning and kept them going and they did not have much time to shoot at us except when they were running and then not with much judgment.”

This account of Doles' brigade in the Gettysburg campaign, originally published in the Chronicle & Sentinel (Augusta, Ga.,) was reprinted in the Milledgeville, Georgia Southern Recorder.

Army of Northern Virginia,
August 12, 1863
Mr. Editor: --
In compliance with my promise, I will now, as I have a day of leisure, essay to give you an account of our Pennsylvania campaign.
[Excerpt covering the march into Pennsylvania, Camp at Chambersburg, Carlisle, descriptions of the countryside and inhabitants, and the advance toward Gettysburg]
We had arrived within five or six miles of Gettysburg, when the boom of cannon was heard. It was not long ere couriers could be seen hurrying past the column as we were marching. Wagons, Quartermasters and cavalry were seen halted by the roadside, or hurrying to the rear of the glorious "foot cavalry," as Jackson's corps used to be called. The cry is soon heard, "fight ahead men, the cavalry Quartermasters [and] doctors are going to the rear." The roar of cannon is more constant. Onward we march with a quick step. "Close up" runs along the line. The lame and halt soon want passes to go to the rear. "Forward men! forward!" General Hill has reached the vanguard of the Army of the Potomac, now transferred to the interior of Pennsylvania, and is driving it back towards Gettysburg.

We hurry on, and soon we are drawn up in line upon the high hills north of the town. In a few minutes, General Robt. E. Rodes, that excellent officer and patriotic gentleman has his division in proper line to advance. Lt. Gen. Ewell, "old Dick" as the boys call him, is riding around to look out the proper position for the division of his corps, and watching the movements of the enemy. Our lines are formed and our artillery placed in position. Our brigade is moved forward and occupies a position between the Washington and Baltimore pikes. We are now in an open field. The town is in full view in front or South of us.

Here we are permitted to halt and rest for a short time. We have been marching very fast for at least twelve miles; the day is exceedingly hot, but the enemy can be seen darkening every hill and vale in our front, and it is no time now to talk about fatigue.

Let us, while we are halted, look around and see where we are, and by what we are surrounded. To our right, on a range of high hills, we see the enemy strongly posted. In four or five lines, we see those who so lately had stood upon the banks of the Rappahannock river and defiantly asked over us. Now they are in the interior of one of their largest States contesting with us the passage into one of their towns.

Hill is now pressing the enemy back. But strong reinforcements are being sent forward to those heights to check his advance. He has driven the enemy back some three or four miles. Gen. Iverson's brigade, of our division, is now put in to assist him. He has to strike the enemy where he is best prepared to receive the shock. Gen. Iverson has a hard time. The reinforcements are pushed in to meet him, and he is forced back with great loss. But he shows to the enemy that every inch of ground is to be hotly contested. The enemy is advancing on the line of our right.

Gen. Daniels' brigade of our division is now moved up to check the Federal advance. Gen. Daniels' brigade of brave North Carolina troops for the first time come into battle array. For the first time, they are ordered forward to meet the enemy. Nobly they advance! They drive the Yankee hirelings before them. The enemy falls back. But they rally. Fresh troops have moved up to their assistance. Again they press our line. Now comes the tug. Volley after volley poured into our ranks. One of our most gallant officers, Brig. Gen. Ransom, now advances with his command. His too, is a brigade of North Carolinians. Up they go; Ransom leading them. About half bent forward on his horse with his hat in his hand. A noble looking fellow. The brigade is up to the fence. Now they open fire. The blue coats waver, reel and fall back. "Forward" is shouted, and the brave North Carolinians charge up to the fence and up to the enemy's reformed lines.

For some distance the foe has been driven across the hill; but now he has reformed upon the massed troops upon the heights. Our line is now forced to stand. A brigade of gallant Alabamians, Gen. Rodes' old brigade, now commanded by Col. Oneal, advances. Forward they move with a cheer, but they are forced to move back. They are soon, however, reformed and again ready to move forward. But the time has come for us to forsake the hill to our right and look to our left. Here the Federals are forming in double columns. The ever vigilant Rodes, and the keen eyed Doles have discovered it. The order has already come for us to move to the left.
[To be continued]
Sources:
O.R., SERIES I, VOLUME XXVII/2., Report of Brig. Gen. George Doles, C. S. Army, commanding brigade https://www.civilwarhome.com/dolesgettysburgor.html
Letter: Captain (or Major?) James W. Beck (K/44GA) to Editor, Southern Recorder (Milledgeville, Ga.), September 15, 1863, pp, 1-2.
"General George Doles’ Georgia Brigade on July 1," Matt Atkinson, Gettysburg National Military Park, Seminar 10, Essay 9. http://npshistory.com/series/symposia/gettysburg_seminars/10/essay9.pdf
Images: Public Domain
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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We have been marching very fast for at least twelve miles; the day is exceedingly hot, but the enemy can be seen darkening every hill and vale in our front, and it is no time now to talk about fatigue.

It's the overlay to every story and gets missed a lot. That heat. Every Gettysburg story has it as the setting. Guessing a lot of us have visited the battlefield on a dreadful, humid, south Pennsylvania day wearing shorts, carrying water and being able to give up and go get iced tea. How anyone was left after those marches to get there defeats my imagination.

Stories like Doles intrigue me. This inclination to distribute credit for success everywhere but himself seems telling. Union or Confederate, post war accounts can be one-man victories, you know? Just ask Sickles.
 
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lelliott19

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Map by Hal Jesperson www.CWmaps.com from wiki
Continuing Beck's account:

....We cross the Baltimore pike and face the enemy. We halt a minute for everything to be properly arranged. On our left, the field as far as you can see, is filled with the armed legions of the enemy. Down the Harrisburg pike, Early is advancing. Gen. Gordon sends up a courier stating that in a few minutes he will be in line. Gen. Gordon commands a brigade of Georgians too. Two Georgia brigades are here thrown together. On our right, we have no support. We are almost isolated. Everything is now ready for us to advance. The Twelfth Georgia on the left, the Fourth Georgia on the left centre, the Forty-Fourth Georgia on the right centre, and the Twenty-first Georgia on the right. Our sharp shooters are detached and thrown out in front of the line to be occupied by Gen. Gordon's brigade. Gen. Doles is now ready.

"Forward," and we move. "Fix bayonets," and the steel immediately glistens. Over a fence and through an open piece of wood and we are in a beautiful field. A line of Yankee sharp shooters are deployed in front of the enemy's line of battle.

We move forward over a fence, and the enemy immediately fired upon us. We hear the command, "charge," and with a yell and a bound we rush to meet our foe and force him back until he reached the rising ground near the town where he has the advantage of us in position, and a battery ready to deal death to everything that comes before it. We do not halt, however, but re-echo the yell that now bursts from the forests on our left, where Gordon has reached the enemy, and charge the line and sweep the field. Soon but few blue coats can be seen in our front, except those that lie bleeding and mangled. We actually cleared the field. For the time, we think our day's work is ended; that we have but to pursue the flying foe.

We are now pressing forward toward the town, the battery still playing upon us. The cry, "by the right flank," is shouted. Looking on our right, just across the turnpike upon which the right of regiment rests, we see floating out in the sulphurious gale that comes sweeping down the from those heights where we were not long since gazing, the old stars and stripes close to us. We were flanked. Soon, very soon, our line has changed front and is up to the pike.

Our regiment, the Forty-fourth Georgia, is, as stated above, resting upon the Baltimore turnpike, the twenty-first Georgia is upon the opposite side, but not up to our line. The column of Federals has passed by us until the flag is just opposite to the right of our regiment. We are not more than forty yards apart. Two plank fences between us. As soon as we open fire upon the flanking party, the line is halted and faced to us and a most murderous volley of musketry poured into our ranks.
Letter: Captain (or Major?) James W. Beck (K/44GA) to Editor, Southern Recorder (Milledgeville, Ga.), September 15, 1863, pp, 1-2.
[To Be Continued]
 
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Ole Miss

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It is amazing that a man with little military experience or formal training could be so much more successful than Iverson who had actual battle experience. This is a really good thread and I thank you for sharing.

As to the heat issue, I have read what many from the Deep South have stated that the Confederates had the advantage of having grown up in hot humid conditions. I believe this to be bunk. The heat was not what troops complained about the moist but rather it was the rain.
Poor quality water, if available at all, severely degraded the ability of an individual soldier to perform at any level of competence regardless of affiliation. The 15th Alabama during the attack against Little Round Top was severely impacted by the absence of water.
Regards
David
 

Ole Miss

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Here is Doyle's Official Report of his Brigade's action at Gettysburg
Regards
David

Reports of Brig. Gen. George Doles, C. S. Army, commanding brigade.JUNE 3-AUGUST 1, 1863.--The Gettysburg Campaign.
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/2 [S# 44]

HEADQUARTERS DOLES' BRIGADE, July 19, 1863.

Maj. H. A. WHITING,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

MAJOR: This brigade was formed into line of battle about 1 p.m. July 1, in front of Gettysburg, Pa. We occupied the left of Major-General Rodes' division. The enemy's cavalry picket appearing in force on our front and left flank, skirmishers from this command were ordered to dislodge him. After a short engagement, he was driven from his position, when we occupied his position (a hill to our left), about 3.30 p.m.
The enemy moved his force from our front, made a strong demonstration on our left, driving our skirmishers from the hill from which we had driven him. The command was then moved by the left flank, to meet any attack the enemy might attempt on our left and rear. We found the enemy strongly posted, with infantry and artillery, on the hill from which our skirmishers had been driven. The brigade of General Gordon, of Major-General Early's division, having made a conjunction with our left, we moved forward to attack the enemy in his position. Our effort was successful. He was driven from behind a rock fence, with heavy loss in killed and wounded, and a large number of prisoners sent to our rear. We suffered severely from the enemy's batteries and musketry in this attack.
While we were in pursuit of the enemy, a strong force of the enemy appeared on my right flank and rear. We changed our front to meet this force. General Gordon continued the pursuit of the enemy toward the town. We met the force on our right, attacked and routed him, pursuing him across the plain in front of Gettysburg. But few of this force escaped us. We then moved toward the theological college, to the right of Gettysburg, where the brigades of Generals Daniel, Ramseur, Iverson, and Colonel O'Neal were engaged with the enemy.
As we advanced toward the enemy, our position at that time being on his right flank, the enemy withdrew his forces from the college hill to the railroad. We then moved rapidly by the left flank, to cut him off from the town. We did not succeed, as he retired faster than we advanced. We followed through the town as far as the outer edge of town, when I received an order to halt the column, and to form line of battle in the street running east and west through the town.
We remained in line here until about 8 p.m. July 2, when we moved by the right flank, forming line and advancing toward the enemy's position on Cemetery Hill. This column of attack was composed of Generals Ramseur's, Iverson's, and this brigade. We moved forward until the line arrived within 100 yards of the enemy's line. After consulting with Generals Ramseur and Iverson, the line was ordered to fall back to a dirt road some 300 yards to the rear. We remained in this position until 1 a.m. July 4. We were then ordered to fall back to the heights near the theological college. This command was actively engaged in heavy skirmishing during July 2, 3, and 4.
In the action of July 1, Lieutenant-Colonel [D. R. E.] Winn was killed and Lieutenant-Colonel [S. P.] Lumpkin fell, severely wounded (leg since amputated), while gallantly leading their respective regiments in a charge against the enemy.
To Col. Edward Willis and Maj. Isaac Hardeman, of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment; Col. J. T. Mercer, Lieut. Col. T. W. Hooper, and Maj. T. C. Glover, of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment; Maj. W. H. Willis, of the Fourth Georgia Regiment, and Maj. W. H. Peebles, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, I attribute the success of this command. The conduct and gallantry of each of these officers on the march and during the engagements around Gettysburg are worthy of emulation. The.company officers and men all did their duty nobly.
To Captain [S. G.] Pryor, Twelfth Georgia; Captain [Joseph B.] Reese, Forty-fourth Georgia; Lieutenant [Jeremiah G.] Stephens, Fourth Georgia; Lieutenant [James S.] Wilder, Twenty-first [Georgia], who were in command of the sharpshooters of the brigade, too much praise cannot be awarded.
To Capt. F. T. Snead, assistant adjutant-general; Lieut. E. A. Hawkins, aide-de-camp, and C. T. Furlow, of my staff, I am under obligations for valuable services rendered.
I have the honor to report and return one flag captured by the Twelfth Georgia. We lost no colors.
The brigade went into action with 131 officers and 1,238 enlisted men; total, 1,369.

List of Casualties.

CommandOfficers
KilledEnlisted
KilledOfficers
WoundedEnlisted
WoundedOfficers
MissingEnlisted
MissingTotal4th Georgia27326---74512th Georgia---4233---104921st Georgia---1---11---51744th Georgia---10643---968Total22211113---31179
Respectfully submitted.
GEO. DOLES,
Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DOLES' BRIGADE, July 19, 1863.

Maj. H. A. WHTING,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

MAJOR: AS an appendix to my official report of the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1 to 4, I respectfully submit the following:
While my command was advancing against the enemy on the evening of July 1, my line was subjected to and did receive a severe fire from one of our own batteries, from which fire I lost several men killed and wounded. This was from a two-gun battery (brass pieces) stationed on the side of the hill where General Rodes' headquarters were at the opening of the engagement.
Again, on July 3, while my command was lying in line of battle, I sent a request back for our batteries stationed on the hill near the pike leading from Gettysburg to Fairfield to shell some houses in my front, for the purpose of dislodging the enemy's sharpshooters. The battery opened fire, its fire taking effect on my men. We waved our flag, and sent them word that they were firing on us. They did not cease firing. I lost several men wounded by the fire of this battery.
I make this statement for the purpose of putting on record my protest against such indifference and negligence on the part of those in command of these two batteries. I have made every effort to find out the batteries, and have failed so far.

I am, major, yours, &c.,
GEO. DOLES,
Brigadier-General
 

lelliott19

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Beck's account continues:

....We reply with equal vigor. The line is so close to ours that a Federal officer mounted, fired at me with his pistol. Instantly, he is pierced with many balls, and he and his horse fall together. Our line is all up. All this time the battery on our flank is raking our line with grape, canister, and shrapnel. Our front is met by a galling fire of musketry. Notwithstanding this, all along our line you see the boys taking deliberate aim, and every shot brings its man. Soon, the order "charge" is given, and we leap the fence and rush into the field where the hated foe is posted. The Federals give way and fly, in wild dismay, and throw down their arms and yield themselves prisoners. Many, to save themselves, lie flat down on the ground, as if dead until we have passed over them.

Scarcely half a dozen of all the line that flanked us reached the town. Nearly every man was killed, wounded or captured. Was there ever such success?

We now advance on toward the hill we left some time since, though not long, as all that I have described was performed in less time than I have been writing about it. Soon the enemy discovering our movements, slowly but sullenly retired toward the town.

But our men are exhausted, and can run no farther. The enemy retire to the town. Gen. Early's troops advance from the east, and push the beaten foe through and beyond to the wooded hill. We march up to York street and are halted. Gen. Early's command is east and southeast of us in line. Our line resting the left on Gen. Early's right, extends through Gettysburg along York street some distance out to the north west and west, our right resting upon Gen. A.P. Hill's left. Gen. Johnson not yet up.

Thus we are posted at sundown on this memorable day. We have met the enemy four or five miles out from the town, and driven him back to and through it. We have darkened the hills and vales with the slain of his ranks. We have met three corps of the Federal army and whipped them from every part of the field....
[To be continued]
 
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lelliott19

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Beck's account continues:
...We might let the field remain with its glories we have described; but justice to the noble dead demands that we should recapitulate, and revisit the vales and hills we have passed. The gallant Lt. Col. Wynn, of the Fourth Georgia, fell pierced through the head, while leading his regiment in the valiant charge across the field <excerpt >. Col. Sam P. Lumkin, noble leader of the Forty-fourth Georgia, was shot down while cheering on his regiment to meet the line that flanked us <excerpt>.

We cannot mention all of those who acted a noble part in the conflict. There is one, however, Sergt. W. H. Copelan, of the Greene county Volunteers (K/44GA), whom I must notice. He was a noble soldier. He was pressing forward when the fatal missile pierced his breast. As a soldier he was kind and affectionate to all his comrades. The true christian character visibly marked all his actions. He has always displayed the same cool and heroic spirit. After he received the fatal wound, he spoke but a few words to a relative that was near and caught his farewell. "Tell all my relatives and friends good-bye, and tell them how I died." He is gone to a better world. We sympathize with his widow mother.

Thus Doles' brigade fought over two fields during the day. The pioneers of the brigade buried three hundred and ninety of the enemy taken from the ground over which we marched. How many Federals were wounded, we cannot say. Not less than one thousand we know; and Gen. Doles' officer commanding guard, was receipted for three thousand prisoners. Our brigade numbered about twelve hundred men. (Doles reported 1,238 enlisted men; 131 officers; total 1,369.) Our whole loss in the fight did not exceed one hundred and fifty in killed and wounded; we lost no prisoners.....
___________________________________________________________
Thanks for reading about Doles' brigade at Gettysburg. Beck's account continues with descriptions of the 2nd and 3rd day, but since Doles' brigade was not seriously engaged, I will end my transcription here. For those who would like to read the entire article, I'm providing the link: https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/lccn/sn82016415/1863-09-15/ed-1/seq-1/]
 

lelliott19

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Really enjoyed reading this account, thanks for posting it @lelliott19
Thanks captdrew. Ive got a real good one from the 9thGA at Gettysburg coming up next.

Im hoping @Tom Elmore @rpkennedy or some of the other Gettysburg gurus will shed some light on the "friendly fire" complaints. Wondering what batteries and what was the cause?
....While my command was advancing against the enemy on the evening of July 1, my line was subjected to and did receive a severe fire from one of our own batteries, from which fire I lost several men killed and wounded. This was from a two-gun battery (brass pieces) stationed on the side of the hill where General Rodes' headquarters were at the opening of the engagement.
Again, on July 3, while my command was lying in line of battle, I sent a request back for our batteries stationed on the hill near the pike leading from Gettysburg to Fairfield to shell some houses in my front, for the purpose of dislodging the enemy's sharpshooters. The battery opened fire, its fire taking effect on my men. We waved our flag, and sent them word that they were firing on us. They did not cease firing. I lost several men wounded by the fire of this battery.
 
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Tom Elmore

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The two brass pieces (Napoleons) on Oak Hill that Dole describes belonged to either Captain Richard Channing Moore Page's battery (4 Napoleons) or Captain William P. Carter's battery (2 Napoleons). At that hour both batteries had been moved back to a second position at the eastern base of Oak Hill. I would lean toward Carter's battery since Page had been so badly mauled in his first position on the eastern slope. This "friendly fire" incident I suppose was the result of the Confederate infantry moving so far forward as to enter the zone of fire of their artillery, which failed to adjust their bearing to stay ahead of the infantry advance.
 

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Left out of official accounts (understandably) is this embarrassing incident that occurred on July 1, probably just as Krzyzanowski's brigade was breaking, in which Doles nearly became a prisoner, thanks to his horse.

[Brig.] Gen. [George] Doles was riding a very powerful sorrel horse, and before he could realize it the horse had seized the bit between his teeth and made straight for the Federal line as a bullet, and going at full speed. We thought the General was gone, but when in about fifty yards of the line he fell off in the wheat. The Federals, being in a wavering condition, did not seem to pay any attention to him. The horse ran up apparently to within ten or fifteen feet of the Federal line, wheeled, and came back around our brigade; and, strange to state, he had no sign of a wound about him. (C. D. Grace, Confederate Veteran magazine)
 

Bruce Vail

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It is amazing that a man with little military experience or formal training could be so much more successful than Iverson who had actual battle experience. This is a really good thread and I thank you for sharing.

As to the heat issue, I have read what many from the Deep South have stated that the Confederates had the advantage of having grown up in hot humid conditions. I believe this to be bunk. The heat was not what troops complained about the moist but rather it was the rain.
Poor quality water, if available at all, severely degraded the ability of an individual soldier to perform at any level of competence regardless of affiliation. The 15th Alabama during the attack against Little Round Top was severely impacted by the absence of water.
Regards
David
Doles had as much relevant military experience as thousands of other officers. While part of Ripley's Brigade, his unit had fought at Seven Days, Antietam and Chancellorsville. At Antietam, Doles had even assumed command of the brigade during the heat of the battle, after Gen. Ripley was wounded and left the field.

Apparently, Doles' report from Antietam does not survive. I have looked but have been unable to locate it.
 
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lelliott19

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Doles had as much relevant military experience as thousands of other officers.
Right Bruce, and probably more than a lot of them. Before the war he joined the "Baldwin Blues," the local militia company. He studied military science and tactics and became pretty proficient for one self-taught. In 1860, he was elected Captain of the Baldwin Blues and developed them into a well-drilled, efficient militia company. When Georgia seceded, the Blues became part of the 4th Georgia. Stationed at Norfolk, Virginia during the first year of the war, Doles was elected Colonel of the 4th GA in May 1862. So he probably had more relevant military experience than most who had no formal training.
when in about fifty yards of the line he fell off in the wheat.
I read another account where it was implied or stated that Doles astutely "bailed off" of the horse and landed on his behind. Although, not wounded, I think the account said his posterior was quite sore? :D
 

lelliott19

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Attached draft map is my interpretation of the time (estimate 3:18 p.m.) that Krzyzanowski began to break, which as you can see was inevitable given the retreat of Von Gilsa on his right. It would also be about the same moment Doles' horse decided to bolt toward the Union lines.
Great map Tom. Thanks so much! What battery would Beck be describing here:
The line is so close to ours that a Federal officer mounted, fired at me with his pistol. Instantly, he is pierced with many balls, and he and his horse fall together. Our line is all up. All this time the battery on our flank is raking our line with grape, canister, and shrapnel.
 
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John S. Carter

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Right Bruce, and probably more than a lot of them. Before the war he joined the "Baldwin Blues," the local militia company. He studied military science and tactics and became pretty proficient for one self-taught. In 1860, he was elected Captain of the Baldwin Blues and developed them into a well-drilled, efficient militia company. When Georgia seceded, the Blues became part of the 4th Georgia. Stationed at Norfolk, Virginia during the first year of the war, Doles was elected Colonel of the 4th GA in May 1862. So he probably had more relevant military experience than most who had no formal training.

I read another account where it was implied or stated that Doles astutely "bailed off" of the horse and landed on his behind. Although, not wounded, I think the account said his posterior was quite sore? :D
This issue of military experience plays about a ten percent value when it comes to the time of a battle. The essential matter is the men who one commands as to their ability to act as a united force and to take advantage of events during that battle.If you read the stories of battles it general is the men on the line ,from junior officers to the sargent that is able to take advantage which the enemy has given to that time.The command that is able to witness the same will also recognize his opportunity.FATE ,LUCK,or failure on the enemy's part can decide the outcome.A fog comes up and Washington is able to save his army at New York.The ol' saying that the calvary arrives just in time to of set an outcome.Hill arrives in time at Antietam from Harbor's Ferry.Knox learns about military from books.Chamberlain with his Maine troops holds the flank at Gettysburg,no military experience.Caesar gave the goddess Fortena/Fortune credit of his victories.Dole was one who saw an advantage ,understood what could be accomplished and with the right troops and under proper leadership,with Luck/Fate did that which even certain generals would not attempt.
 

matthew mckeon

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Without special knowledge of Gen. Dole: I bet he and the officers he thanked laid the groundwork for his success before July 1st. A Union general C.F. Smith said a good officer prepares for the day of battle every day. That preparation pays off.
 
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