Newton, Massachusetts Civil War Monument

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Jan 26, 2016
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For those who do not know me, one of my interests is the role of Massachusetts in the war, as it is my home state. I have a particular fondness for this memorial since I am originally from Newton.
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The monument, which consists of the obelisk in the background and then the section in the foreground where the tablets list the names of the fallen, was dedicated on June 23, 1864, making it the second oldest Civil War monument in Massachusetts. In fact, the tablets originally listed 43 names in 1864 but now list 61 as 18 more names were added in the remaining 9 months of war. The names are only listed on the left and right tablets - the middle is blank,to be used only if needed.

One of the names listed is Lieutenant Eben White, who was originally in the 5th Massachusetts Infantry during the initial call for troops in April 1861. He eventually served with the 1st Middle Tennessee Cavalry, a Unionist regiment, then became a Lieutenant in the 7th USCT.

On October 19, 1863, Lt. White and three other men went onto the plantation of John H. Sothoron and asked two enslaved men there if they wanted to enlist. When they responded in the affirmative, Sothoron and his son both threatened to shoot Lt. White. As White attempted to explain the law to them, the two Sothorons continued their heated and expletive-laden threats and ultimately shot him. At least one of the soldiers with White fired back but the Sothorons escaped, initiating a manhunt organized by the War Department. John Sothoron made his way to Virginia, then Canada and after the war he returned to take possession of his plantation. In 1866, the War Department urged the Governor of Maryland to prosecute him for manslaughter, however Sothoron won the case.
 
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ARW

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It is a great story. I am in the process of starting a blog on Massachusetts in the Civil War and am looking at the story of Eben White. The War Department actually printed a pamphlet in the 1870s on the murder.
It caught my attention because I had a 3x Cousin who was a Lt. in the 33rd USCT in SC and was murdered on the street in 1865 by a formal rebel solider.
 
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DRW

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For those who do not know me, one of my interests is the role of Massachusetts in the war, as it is my home state. I have a particular fondness for this memorial since I am originally from Newton.View attachment 294435
The monument, which consists of the obelisk in the background and then the section in the foreground where the tablets list the names of the fallen, was dedicated on June 23, 1864, making it the second oldest Civil War monument in Massachusetts. In fact, the tablets originally listed 43 names in 1864 but now list 61 as 18 more names were added in the remaining 9 months of war. The names are only listed on the left and right tablets - the middle is blank,to be used only if needed.

One of the names listed is Lieutenant Eben White, who was originally in the 5th Massachusetts Infantry during the initial call for troops in April 1861. He eventually served with the 1st Middle Tennessee Cavalry, a Unionist regiment, then became a Lieutenant in the 7th USCT.

On October 19, 1863, Lt. White and three other men went onto the plantation of John H. Sothoron and asked two enslaved men there if they wanted to enlist. When they responded in the affirmative, Sothoron and his son both threatened to shoot Lt. White. As White attempted to explain the law to them, the two Sothorons continued their heated and expletive-laden threats and ultimately shot him. At least one of the soldiers with White fired back but the Sothorons escaped, initiating a manhunt organized by the War Department. John Sothoron made his way to Virginia, then Canada and after the war he returned to take possession of his plantation. In 1866, the War Department urged the Governor of Maryland to prosecute him for manslaughter, however Sothoron won the case.

I grew up in Newton and go back regularly. I wasn't aware of this monument? Where is it?
 
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Joined
Jan 26, 2016
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Location
Massachusetts
Very interesting memorial. What a sad story of Lt. Furman.
It is a very interesting monument. It's interesting that the monument was built during the war, which is unusual. I often wonder what was going through the minds of those residents that June day as the monument was dedicated, knowing that there was at least another tablet and a half to add names that could be their sons, brothers, husband.
 
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