Tell me more! New-to-me 1862 P53

USMC0802

Cadet
Joined
Jun 28, 2021
Old hand at collecting but very new to CW-era Enfields. This is the first one I've really dug into and I've hit a roadblock. Hoping someone will recognize a half-struck stock marking that can illuminate the history of the piece. It's a "...&Co" under a crown. Only broad arrow on any component is the nipple protector. Musket looks untouched and all of the assembly "hash marks" are matching down to the screws. Only part I did not remove was the trigger assembly which didn't want to pop out and I was not interested in forcing it. My impression thus far is that this musket must have been assembled by one of the smaller firms.

My copy of The English Connection was delivered yesterday and scanned through the Confederate viewer marks without seeing anything that would match. Perhaps a Federal purchase?

Eager to learn more about this piece. I've long desired an unmolested P53 and I think this is a keeper...

I will post a more complete photo set below, here is the marking in question:
IMG_5435.JPG
 

USMC0802

Cadet
Joined
Jun 28, 2021
Hah thanks Ken - I take a lot of gun photos in the course of my business but I'd class these as "good enough to get the job done" but far short of artistic. :smile:
 

Craig L Barry

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Location
Murfreesboro, TN
This is a Tower marked Birmingham P53. These were very common. I don't see any of the more common inspection marks that would suggest it was purchased by either US or CS. It is 25 gauge, which was not unusual. And for that matter aside from the snapcap, nothing that suggests it was a WD (government gun). The snapcap was probably added at some point later for purposes of dressing it up. It is representative of the kind of P53 that was used by both sides in great numbers but also elsewhere in the world.

The initials on the barrel bands are kind of interesting. That is not usually seen but not unheard of either. The marking MOXHAM is probably Thomas Moxham who established himself in Birmingham as a gunmaker & victualler.” The term “victualler” meant a merchant who supplied provisions like food and drink to Royal Navy vessels. Moxham began in 1799, and worked at a number of addresses during his lifetime. He died in 1837 at the age of 75 and was succeeded in the business by his son Thomas Moxham Jr., who continued operations as a “gun & pistol maker” at his father’s 37 Moland Street address, and also operated a second location at 26 Weaman Street from 1853-1861 in the Birmingham gun quarter. Thomas Jr. died in 1878 and the company went out of business at that time. The bottom of the barrel is marked by the barrel maker BURR. The mark on the ramrod spoon looks like T &CG for Thomas and Charles Gilbert. They made ramrods, Enfield tools and such.

Nice looking P53 which should display well.
 
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USMC0802

Cadet
Joined
Jun 28, 2021
Thanks very much Craig! Any idea on the stock stamp just ahead of the buttplate tang?

I'm very pleased with this rifle. I've passed on many of them because they were monkeyed with over the years - not unexpected but would bug me. This one hit the sweet spot of condition...just enough wear and tear to look like it was there. Now to rummage for a bayonet...
 

Sundance

Private
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Nice Enfield. Congrats. Sergeant Major Barry, why do you think the nipple protector/snap cap would have been added later? Were the P53's not shipped here with them or were they usually discarded?
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
This is a Tower marked Birmingham P53. These were very common. I don't see any of the more common inspection marks that would suggest it was purchased by either US or CS. It is 25 gauge, which was not unusual. And for that matter aside from the snapcap, nothing that suggests it was a WD (government gun). The snapcap was probably added at some point later for purposes of dressing it up. It is representative of the kind of P53 that was used by both sides in great numbers but also elsewhere in the world.

The initials on the barrel bands are kind of interesting. That is not usually seen but not unheard of either. The marking MOXHAM is probably Thomas Moxham who established himself in Birmingham as a gunmaker & victualler.” The term “victualler” meant a merchant who supplied provisions like food and drink to Royal Navy vessels. Moxham began in 1799, and worked at a number of addresses during his lifetime. He died in 1837 at the age of 75 and was succeeded in the business by his son Thomas Moxham Jr., who continued operations as a “gun & pistol maker” at his father’s 37 Moland Street address, and also operated a second location at 26 Weaman Street from 1853-1861 in the Birmingham gun quarter. Thomas Jr. died in 1878 and the company went out of business at that time. The bottom of the barrel is marked by the barrel maker BURR. The mark on the ramrod spoon looks like T &CG for Thomas and Charles Gilbert. They made ramrods, Enfield tools and such.

Nice looking P53 which should display well.
Agree its the T&CG mark on the ramrod spoon. I have one that is clearly marked. Also, my barrel is made by BURR too.
 

Jeff in Ohio

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
Very nice Enfield. Here are some photos of a MOXHAM marked Enfield I sold to Tim Prince a while ago - it has the best SHC markings I've ever seen - very deep and sharp. Notice the proofmarks are stamped over top of Liege Belgium proofmarks. Some early Model 1853s have this mark - likely the maker used imported Belgian barrels and reproofed them.

Enfield-2(#E-2)-06760.JPG


Enfield-2(#E-2)-06775.JPG


Enfield-2(#E-2)-06775-2.JPG


Enfield-2(#E-2)-06821.JPG
 

Craig L Barry

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Location
Murfreesboro, TN
Nice Enfield. Congrats. Sergeant Major Barry, why do you think the nipple protector/snap cap would have been added later? Were the P53's not shipped here with them or were they usually discarded?

P53s were shipped with snapcaps as a rule. This particular snapcap has the broad arrow mark which means it was produced on a contract for the War Department. It does not match the rest of the piece as there aren't any other parts with government markings. Snapcaps served a function for the British manual of arms as it protected the cone when soldiers would dry fire on command as part of their drill. This was not a feature of the loading and firing drill here during the Civil War-era. If the snapcap was lost or discarded by US/CS soldiers, replacements were not issued.

Also not enough of "&Co" stamp is visible in front of the buttplate tang to determine what it might be.
 
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