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New Orleans Rewrites History...On Its Lampposts

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by Pat Young, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. RobertP

    RobertP Major

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    As for the Irish in New Orleans I suggest you are cherry picking again. This from the book The Irish in New Orleans, Dr. Laura Kelly. (Article in link) : http://thewildgeese.irish/profiles/...d-the-irish-in-new-orleans-by-dr-laura-kelley

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    Excerpts:

    "The importance of New Orleans as a port and control of the Mississippi river was not lost on Lincoln. Union forces targeted New Orleans and successfully captured the city in April 1862 without a fight leaving the largest and most prosperous city in the Confederacy under Union control for the remainder of the war. However, the occupation of the city did not discourage its residents from showing defiance to Yankee rule, nor did it stop the Irish from enlisting to fight for the Confederate cause. Hibernian sentiments in New Orleans might perhaps have been best captured by Father Mullon's reply to General Benjamin Butler's accusation that the good priest had refused to bury Union soldiers to which Mullon replied 'The charge is false General. I'd be delighted to bury any Yankee, including yourself.' "

    "Irish soldiers could be found in most Louisiana divisions. However, several were particularly notable for their large Irish numbers. Among them were the Emmet and Montgomery Guards of the 1st Louisiana Volunteers; the 7th Louisiana Volunteers with a company from Donaldsonville which was over 90 percent Irish; the 10th with five companies dominated by the Irish; the 1st Battalion of the Louisiana Volunteers, frequently referred to as the Louisiana Tigers filled by New Orleans Irish, and the6th Louisiana Volunteers: of the 980 men in the 6th at least 468 were born in Ireland and 100 more had common Irish surnames."

    "To any Irish national, the words "North" could easily be substituted for "British" and "South" swapped for "Irish." Ardent Irish nationalist and journalist John Mitchel's own son(also named John) fought, and ultimately died, for the Confederate Cause. He conveyed this sentiment shortly before his death in 1864. ' I die willing for the South, but oh, that it had been for Ireland.' "
     
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  3. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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    I have written quite a bit about Irish in Confederate service, so no surprise to me. Still does not address the numbers of Irish and German from the city who enlisted in the Union forces or who otherwise worked with the Union government of the city. Also, John Mitchel lived in Richmond, not New Orleans during the war. As far as I know, he only lived in New York, Knoxville, Washington and Richmond during the 1850s and 1860s. A well-known Irish Protestant nationalist, he strongly supported the right of states to allow slavery.

    During the war he edited the Richmond Enquirer.

    Mitchel's son Willie was in the color guard of the 1st Virginia (not a Louisiana regiment) and was killed during Pickett's Charge.
     
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  4. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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    John Mitchel lost another son in Confederate service. His son, John C. Mitchel was in the First South Carolina Artillery. He later commanded Fort Sumter. Also not from New Orleans. Here is an account of his death from his engineer:

    On the fourteenth day of the bombardment, being the 20th of July, 1864, Captain Mitchel ascended the stairway of the western angle of the gorge, about 1 o’clock P.M., to examine the movements of the fleet and land force of the enemy, preparatory to writing his daily report for transmission to the city by dispatch-boat that night. Arriving at the head of the stairs and passing out upon the level of the original terreplein of the fort, he found the sentinel there at his post well protected by breast-high shelter within the massive parapet of earthwork necessary to secure the safety of the stair-tower beneath it. Stationing himself near the spot, but not within the sentry-box, he rested his arm and glass on the parapet and began his observations. Before him, in the sea-view, were the low hulls of the monitors lying at anchor off Morris Island, the wooden gunboats and blockaders resting also at their appointed stations outside the bar, and father out, in the offing, a despatch-boat going North. No movement in the fleet at all that day, except among the tugs and tenders. The sea was smooth, the sky bright, and the sun blazing with midsummer heat. Not work in the Union batteries of Morris Island close by, their rifle and mortar-shelling keeping their gunners as busy as they could be; hottest time of all at the battered ruin of a fort taking daily transformation into an indestructible earthwork.

    The commander was not unduly exposing himself, but while engaged with his glass a mortar-shell of the largest kind rose in the air, and, descending well to the westward of the fort, as if about to strike the wharf, burst at an altitude of some eighty feet above the water. The bursting of a mortar-shell so high in the air and somewhat outside the walls was no more to the garrison than a matter of ordinary occurrence, scarcely noticeable in the climate of the fort. The commander continued his observation through it all, his eye fixed to the glass, until suddenly struck to the ground by a large piece of the shell, wounding him with great laceration on the left hip. Had he been in the sentry-box, he would have escaped all hurt, for that was protected on the rear as well as the front.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
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  5. matthew mckeon

    matthew mckeon Brigadier General Moderator

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    "Fort Humbug..." hee hee!
     
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  6. contestedground

    contestedground Sergeant

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    Kinda matter whether the people in question were white or black, no? Free or enslaved? Pro-Confederate or pro-Unionist?

    Let's not make the mistake that all southerners were white people who supported the Confederacy. This is especially ridiculous in such a diverse city as New Orleans, which isn't even typically "southern."
     

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