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New Orleans Rewrites History...On Its Lampposts

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by Pat Young, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. contestedground

    contestedground Corporal

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    Inquiring whether they are to be removed is not asking for the city to remove them.

    This one got your juices running, didn't it?
     
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  3. contestedground

    contestedground Corporal

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  4. contestedground

    contestedground Corporal

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    I see only one person in this thread who seems to be deeply aggrieved. :frantic::stomp::hot:

    :bounce:
     
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  5. Bee

    Bee 1st Lieutenant

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    I should have been clear as @contestedground has pointed out: this only involves New Orleans, so my reference only applies to the concept of whether or not New Orleans could claim Confederate control of the city after Farragut & Co. came to town.

    Nice pictures. I have actually been to Shreveport to visit family.
     
  6. Drew

    Drew Captain

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    I hope you enjoyed it. Honestly, I'm not interested in arguing over lamp posts. :smile:

    An assertion was made up thread that the State of Louisiana was not ruled by the Union Army during the war. This assertion is completely correct, it wasn't, at any time. :wink:
     
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  7. cash

    cash Brev. Brig. Gen'l

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    I used to live there. Great food. :smile:
     
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  8. Bee

    Bee 1st Lieutenant

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    Me either! I would rather talk about how much I loved spending 4 months out of the year in La as a kid, and how much I loved the people, places and food. Gator tastes sometimes like chicken and sometimes like calamari....and sometimes like both :smile:
     
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  9. Drew

    Drew Captain

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    Interesting. Most of the Barksdale folks live in Bossier City, but I'll give you a pass on the food. :smile:
     
  10. Desert Kid

    Desert Kid Sergeant Major

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    The people of New Orleans under occupation would seriously question that "liberation" comment.
     
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  11. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

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    Some experienced it as occupation and others as liberation. From a post I wrote five years ago:

    When the first Union Navy ships reached Confederate New Orleans on April 25, 1862, they were met with an unexpected greeting. Hundreds of civilians had gathered to welcome them to the city.

    The welcome, however, soon turned to bloodshed. As the Union sailors watched helplessly, Confederate partisans on land opened fire on the unarmed crowd. A captured Confederate soldier later questioned by a Union officer said that “some 15 or 20 Germans were shot down on the levee” because Confederates were incensed by “Union expressions on the part of the foreign population of New Orleans.”

    A few weeks later, a reporter for The New York Times visited New Orleans after Union troops had ended Confederate massacres of civilians. He interviewed an Irish immigrant who told of hardships under the Confederate rule: “Divil a bit of money have I seen for a year, and Confederate scrip [money] has brought the wife and children to starvation almost,” the immigrant said.

    Overjoyed at the Union victory, the man shouted; “Hurrah for the ould flag! They wanted to make me fight against it, but I never have fought and I never will fit for ‘em.”

    The same reporter worked his way through Union-occupied New Orleans and encountered what at first seemed an extraordinary sight:

    “Here and there we could see Zouaves [soldiers in Algerian-style uniforms] in their picturesque dress, posted as sentinels upon the wharves. At first I did not understand why Southern soldiers should be permitted to bear arms after the city was in our power, but it was subsequently explained. These men belonged to the Home Guard, an organization composed exclusively of the foreign population of the city, who had chosen a neutral position on the war question, and were acting as a police for the protection of property from the lawlessness of the rabble.”

    The Irish made up 14 percent of New Orleans population and German immigrants made up 12 percent more. Both groups had suffered violently under the city’s Know Nothing government and were disaffected when Louisiana became part of the Confederacy. Their resistance to Confederate rule may have helped hand the city over to the Union, and their cooperation with the federal government would help secure this one small spot of Blue in a land of Confederate Gray for the Union. They would not just help end Confederate terrorism in the city, they would play a role in expanding Union control in the Deep South.

    The first immigrants to support the Union were the very Confederate soldiers whose mutiny at Fort Jackson against their nativist officers had handed over New Orleans to the opposing force. Two hundred of the Fort Jackson Confederates, almost a third of the total, switched sides and took the oath of loyalty to the United States. These men were quickly put to work preparing the city’s defenses against a Confederate counterattack.

    Just days after the Crescent City was captured, the Union 8th Vermont Regiment announced it would enroll New Orleans men as soldiers to replace its losses. Only one native Southerner signed up, but 6 French immigrants, 5 Germans, and one Swiss immigrant quickly joined the regiment. Over the coming months hundreds of men from the city joined the Union army. Seventy-eight percent of New Orleans recruits were foreign born. Thirty-two percent were Irish, 31 percent German, and 15 percent came from other countries. One Confederate woman lamented that “nearly all the Dutch or Germans…have turned against us.”
     
  12. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

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    In addition, 15% of the population was black. Only 44% were native-born whites, although this portion of the population gets most of the attention when considering the "occupation" of New Orleans.
     
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  13. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

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  14. Copperhead-mi

    Copperhead-mi 1st Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    Thanks Pat, I've once again learned something new. I had never heard of the Confederate shootings of civilians in New Orleans or the neutral Zouaves.
     
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  15. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

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    New Orleans had been under Know Nothing control during the years immediately prior to the Union taking the city. When the Union troops arrived, many immigrants saw it as the end of a dark night of bigotry. Ben Butler was brilliant in cultivating the disaffected immigrants of the city. He created work programs and food distribution for them.
     
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  16. Saruman

    Saruman Corporal

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    Apart from the inaccurate dates and poor choice of words (should have used dominion rather than domination) I like the lamp posts. They remind me of the capitol building in Austin which has the symbols of the five governing powers of Texas over the years embedded in its floor. It's nice to see the history of the area displayed in such an interesting manner.
     
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  17. RobertP

    RobertP Major

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    That would be 6 flags as in the 50 year old Six Flags Amusement Park.

    IMG_1821.PNG
     
  18. Saruman

    Saruman Corporal

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    Cheers - I forgot the sixth one. I won't say which of the six ones it was though :thumbsup:
     
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  19. Joshism

    Joshism Sergeant

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    I would think the New Orleans story would be better know. I guess the Solid South myth has been more important to Southerners than how events in New Orleans "demonstrate" that foreigners are inherently treacherous.
     
  20. RobertP

    RobertP Major

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    The "mutiny" was one author's take in a 2011 book. To my knowledge no one has followed up on the claim. The real problem was an overwhelmed CS Navy, poor quality Confederate gunpowder and a lot of luck on Farragut's part. If the Germans deserted as that author Pierson contends they have a lot in common with their former countrymen on the other side at Chancellorsville.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
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  21. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

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    Or loyal.
     
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