Research New Jersey born Rebels.

Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Location
Texas
Nothing fascinates me more than Northern born Confederates. Rebels from New Jersey are particularly interesting to be because NJ's geographical relation to the War. Border states like Maryland and Delaware who were pretty politicaly divided were only a stones throw away from Jersey. The Garden state had a significant Copperhead population, and was last in the North to end slavery. Cities like Newark, and counties like Bergen we're throughly anti war on economic and cultural grounds.

So I have to know if states, like Maryland and Delware could provide an estimated 6000 men for the Confederacy combined, would it not be possible for NJ to send something like 500 men South to the CSA? If so, is there anyway I could dig deeper to find those names?

Thoughts?

1860 NJ.jpg
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Location
Central Pennsylvania
I'm not sure there was an organized recruiting effort up here, as in enlistment stations if that's what you mean? Seems to me what happened was, if someone had loyalties to the South AND wished to put them into action they picked up and went there. You see the usual sympathizers staying put and witching up a storm from a position of safety but organized groups weren't encouraged any more than Unionists were in the south.

Copperheads may have been pains in the neck, they just don't seem to me to qualify as rebels? While men north and south marched off to war and got shot at, Copperheads seem to have spent a lot of time boo-hooing. I didn't see anyone tying their legs to a table- they could have put their words into action.

I don't know. Any time you see someone boo-hooing on economic grounds, better believe they're literally banking on someone else to do the heavy lifting.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Location
Texas
I'm not sure there was an organized recruiting effort up here, as in enlistment stations if that's what you mean? Seems to me what happened was, if someone had loyalties to the South AND wished to put them into action they picked up and went there. You see the usual sympathizers staying put and witching up a storm from a position of safety but organized groups weren't encouraged any more than Unionists were in the south.

Copperheads may have been pains in the neck, they just don't seem to me to qualify as rebels? While men north and south marched off to war and got shot at, Copperheads seem to have spent a lot of time boo-hooing. I didn't see anyone tying their legs to a table- they could have put their words into action.

I don't know. Any time you see someone boo-hooing on economic grounds, better believe they're literally banking on someone else to do the heavy lifting.
Sorry, let me better define it. I'm talking about New Jersians that had Southern ties that went South to fight for the Confederacy. Let me give some examples.


 
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Location
Texas
"There was reason to be suspicious of Old Nassau, whose alumni were deeply complicit in the Rebel cause. If 155 Tigers enlisted to fight for the North, as period accounts say, there were many more than that on the Southern side. Research by PAW turned up at least 200 Rebel soldiers, and intensive mobilization in the Confederacy meant there probably were many more. No full list of Princeton’s Johnny Rebs ever was compiled."

 
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