New Host for the Regimental Histories Forum

19thOhio

Corporal
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
I'm working on a regimental history right now. No real high hopes of success, but working on it nights and weekends is more entertaining than watching Netflix.

I'll be sure to check back here more often!
A regimental history is probably of interest to descendants, local history buffs and regimental history collectors. I feel one does not need a degree in history or writing to write a decent regimental history. It takes someone with a true interest in the story that evolves as research is conducted with an expectation and question "how with this story end?" Writing a regimental history is such an adventure. As I wrote about the 19th Ohio I almost felt that I was there with them. A tear came into my eyes as I wrote the very last sentence ". . . the Regiment, as an organized fighting force, ceased to exist." The experience has made me aware of so much nineteenth century American history and geography.

I have no idea how much sales there is for most regimental histories. Probably never a best seller unless it is of some very significant regiment and that history is probably already written, perhaps several times.

Why use a publisher? There is probably little profit for a publisher in such writing anyway. Except for the pandemic, local marketing is fairly easy and even fun. I was simply looking for a history of the19th Ohio. Finding none, I figured if I wanted to read one, I'd have to write it.

If you have a topic or specific regiment, go for it. It's your project.

Best of luck. I can be reached as well.

Paul
 
Joined
Aug 27, 2020
Location
North Carolina
Why use a publisher?
Paul - that is another great question. I prefer to use a publisher for my regimental histories. They are responsible for layout, editing (and maybe peer review, depending on the publisher), proofreading, and, they are responsible for a lot of the distribution. My history of the Branch-Lane brigade (General Lee's Immortals) is available in almost 100 academic libraries world-wide, plus, it can be found on the shelves of bookstores at National Battlefield Parks like Chancellorsville and Petersburg. A lot of those stores will seldom pick up a self-published title (but it does happen). The advantage to self-publishing is that you have total control over the final product, and you make a few more dollars.
 
Last edited:

JeffFromSyracuse

Corporal
Joined
Jul 6, 2020
Location
Philly Suburbs
My history of the Branch-Lane brigade (General Lee's Immortals) is available in almost 100 academic libraries world-wide
This, to me, is the ultimate goal. I like to think I'm building upon the regiment's well-known Gettysburg story, plus do my part to chip away at gaps of what we know about Jericho Mills, Bethesda Church, Peeble's Farm, and Hatcher's Run that others can eventually build upon.
 
Joined
Aug 27, 2020
Location
North Carolina
This, to me, is the ultimate goal. I like to think I'm building upon the regiment's well-known Gettysburg story, plus do my part to chip away at gaps of what we know about Jericho Mills, Bethesda Church, Peeble's Farm, and Hatcher's Run that others can eventually build upon.
I agree. My goal is to fill in the gaps, to get information into the hands of as many readers as possible, or at least make the information accessible.
 

lupaglupa

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 18, 2019
Location
Upstate New York
Typically, the people who buy regimentals had an ancestor in that regiment, or are diehard researchers
@Michael C. Hardy so glad to see you taking on this forum! I have a few regimental histories (my ancestors and my husband's) - it surprises me when I do research how few libraries buy these, even when they cover troops from the local area.
 
Joined
Aug 27, 2020
Location
North Carolina
@Michael C. Hardy so glad to see you taking on this forum! I have a few regimental histories (my ancestors and my husband's) - it surprises me when I do research how few libraries buy these, even when they cover troops from the local area.
It really depends on who is in charge of doing the ordering. And, I've noticed, at least locally, a real purge of history related books in the past two or three years. A library to the county north of me got rid of their ORs, Southern Historical Society Papers, Rebellion Record, and a host of regimentals (and probably others). Of course, some of those I just listed can now be accessed online.
 

19thOhio

Corporal
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
In self publishing the author is responsible for everything: every word, keystroke, indentation, headers, spacing. Everything! But it is entirely your creation, on your schedule. Naturally seek help and advice from others, perhaps from this forum. Paying a steep price for editing or proofreading doesn't guarantee a perfect publication. There are several good websites that aid self-publishing authors.

Of course using a publisher to handle details for many on this forum who are professional historians teaching or authoring several books and are general Civil War topics and needing a wide circulation to the public and other academics makes sense.

Larry Stevens in Ohio in the Civil War, online, has compiled extensive bibliography (46 items) for, perhaps, every Ohio regiment. It includes many sources for diaries, news articles , etc. It also has my history listed at the bottom of the list. Getting listed as such and Amazon and you are in business world wide. Luckily, the archivist at a local museum is my Amazon agent. Many self-publishing sites have help, suggestions and hints for a good product. When you are sure of your work just send you history in pdf form and a week later or less you get a box of quality printed books.
 

GwilymT

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
Greetings! I’m Michael, the new host for the Regimental Forum. My passion for the War started in 1982. An uncle took me to a reenactment, bought me a jacket and hat, and I was allowed to carry the flag. I was ten and hooked on history. For the next two-plus decades, I was heavily involved in the reenacting world, eventually leading an infantry battalion. I don’t reenact much anymore, but we do spend many weekends volunteering as costumed interpreters at historic sites. My interest in the War years grew, and in 1995, I started working on my first book, a history of the 37th​ North Carolina Troops. While I have written on many different aspects of the War, regimentals remain my first love. Besides the history of the 37th​ NC, I have penned histories on the 58th​ North Carolina Troops, the 39th​ Battalion Virginia Cavalry, and the Branch-Lane brigade. My current project headed to the publishers is tentatively entitled Feeding the Army of Northern Virginia (Savas Beatie).

My interest in regiments runs deep, from how they worked (or didn’t work), officers, food/logistics, military discipline, chaplains, armament, etc. Besides the regiments listed above, I am also interested in the 37th​ Alabama, 8th​ Florida, 16th​ North Carolina, McClung’s Battery (CS), and the 3rd​ North Carolina Mounted Infantry, 13th​ Tennessee Cavalry, 10th​ Michigan Cavalry, 17th​ Michigan Infantry, and 40th​ United States Colored Troops (US).

I am a graduate of the University of Alabama, blog at Looking for the Confederate War, and call western North Carolina home. I’m looking forward to sharing and learning more in the Regimental Forum.
Thank you for taking up this role and I’m excited to participate!
 

GwilymT

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
It really depends on who is in charge of doing the ordering. And, I've noticed, at least locally, a real purge of history related books in the past two or three years. A library to the county north of me got rid of their ORs, Southern Historical Society Papers, Rebellion Record, and a host of regimentals (and probably others). Of course, some of those I just listed can now be accessed online.
Is the issue funding? I know a lot of libraries up here are struggling.
 
Top