New Confederate uniform book 'Never In Rags'

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tullock

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Hi
My latest book ‘ Never In Rags’, described by William Frassanito as “The most comprehensive study of Confederate uniforms, and their distribution, ever undertaken”, has recently been published. It is the first in a nine volume series. Each volume comprises over one thousand pages of uniform issue tables, photographs, color plates and eyewitness accounts. Volume one covers uniform issues to Confederate forces in the East (from Virginia, down through the Carolinas and Georgia to Eastern Florida in 1863).
All reviews have been excellent. The latest from Civil War News states “This book has considerable merit. As a reference tool, this book is well worth the cost. It is easy to read and has some of the best graphics I have seen”.
It is available in hardback from Military Book Publishing in the UK
Thank you
Jeff Dugdale
 
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Hi
My latest book ‘ Never In Rags’, described by William Frassanito as “The most comprehensive study of Confederate uniforms, and their distribution, ever undertaken”, has recently been published. It is the first in a nine volume series. Each volume comprises over one thousand pages of uniform issue tables, photographs, color plates and eyewitness accounts. Volume one covers uniform issues to Confederate forces in the East (from Virginia, down through the Carolinas and Georgia to Eastern Florida in 1863).
All reviews have been excellent. The latest from Civil War News states “This book has considerable merit. As a reference tool, this book is well worth the cost. It is easy to read and has some of the best graphics I have seen”.
It is available in hardback from Military Book Publishing in the UK
Thank you
Jeff Dugdale
Hello Jeff.

Welcome to Civil War Talk.

I'm looking forward to your book.
Please keep us informed when your future volumes are published.
 
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tullock

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Hi Everyone,
I would like to thank you all for your interest. Over the next couple of days I will post several extracts from the book. Below is part of the introduction to the book.


In just one year, 1863, the huge amount of clothing listed below was distributed to just four Confederate regiments – 5th South Carolina Cavalry, 36th Virginia Infantry, 47th North Carolina Infantry and 63rd Georgia Infantry.

6223 Jackets and coats
8947 Pairs pants
7576 Pairs shoes and boots
8172 Shirts
7284 Pairs socks
7548 Pairs drawers
5504 Hats and caps

These were typical regimental issues to all Confederate units at this point in the War.

Still think Confederates were dressed in rags?




‘NEVER IN RAGS’, is the first volume in a groundbreaking nine volume series which covers, in great detail, the supply and issue of uniforms to the Confederate army during the Civil war. It is a unique and provocative work which challenges the myth of the ‘Ragged Reb’, utilizing period photos, numerous personal recollections, specially commissioned artwork and thousands of Regimental clothing issue tables.
This series of books finally lays to rest the fabled image of the ill-equipped, starving Reb and strongly promotes the finely clothed and generously supplied Confederate soldier.
Volume one covers the Eastern armies in 1863, Volume two Eastern Armies 1862, Volume three 1864. The Army of Tennessee and the Trans-Mississippi Department are covered in later volumes.

Below is one of the color plates and text.


Private. 9th Louisiana Infantry Regiment. January 1863

The hard drinking, hard fighting 9th Louisiana Infantry was a unit serving in Harry T. Hay’s Brigade. Throughout its service with the Army of Northern Virginia it received huge amounts of clothing on a regular basis. For example, between December 1862 and December 1863, the regiment, barely numbering 300-400 men, was issued 1090 jackets, 1839 pairs of pants, 1627 pairs of shoes, 1363 shirts, 967 pairs of socks, 1328 pairs of drawers, 378 caps and 44 hats. The other regiments in the Brigade received similar issues of clothing.
This soldier is wearing one of the 525 jackets issued to his regiment in December 1862, 240 of which were described as being ‘drab’ in color. Drab usually referred to undyed jean or wool cloth and could range in color from off-white to a light brown or dirty gray. His light blue jean cloth pants and plain gray cap are both Richmond Depot issue. His gray vest is a civilian item.
In the illustration the soldier is examining a Federal uniform recently acquired at Fredericksburg.


1..jpg
 

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North Carolina's soldiers were not dressed in rags. Through the use of these vessels an immense amount of valuable stores was imported. No entirely accurate figures can be obtained as to the amount, but Governor Vance said in 1885 that he had distributed large quantities of machinery, 60,000 pairs of hand wool cards, 10,000 scythes, 200 barrels of bluestone for fertilizing wheat, 250,000 pairs of shoes, 50,000 blankets, cloth for 250,000 uniforms, 12,000 overcoats, 2,000 Enfield rifles with 100 rounds of ammunition each, 100,000 pounds of bacon, 500 sacks of coffee, $50,000 worth of medicines at gold prices, and an immense supply of minor stores. Through this means the North Carolina troops were clothed. Nor were North Carolina troops alone served. After Chickamauga
WP.gif
Longstreet's men received 14,000 complete uniforms and when
WP.gif
Johnston surrendered the state had on hand 92,000 suits.
To pay for all these things some cotton was sent out and warrants were issued payable in cotton and rosin in North Carolina which the Union army afterwards captured.
source-http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/North_Carolina/_Texts/CBHHNC/3/2*.html
 

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Burning Billy

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How to explain sources from that era that describe Confederate soldiers as dressed in rags?

Looking at the photographs of Confederate soldiers would quickly dispel any notion that they were universally ragged, but I wonder if using the word 'never' might be going too far in the othe direction.

Here is one example:

We were having our literary exercises on Friday afternoon, at our Seminary, when the cry reached our ears. Rushing to the door, and standing on the front portico we beheld in the direction of the Theological Seminary, a dark, dense mass, moving toward town. Our teacher, Mrs. Eyster, at once said:

'Children, run home as quickly as you can.'

"It did not require repeating. I am satisfied some of the girls did not reach their homes before the Rebels were in the streets.

"As for myself, I had scarcely reached the front door, when, on looking up the street, I saw some of the men on horseback. I scrambled in, slammed shut the door, and hastening to the sitting room, peeped out between the shutters.

"What a horrible sight! There they were, human beings! Clad almost in rags, covered with dust, riding wildly, pell-mell down the hill toward our home! Shouting, yelling most unearthly, cursing, brandishing their revolvers, and firing right and left.

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/gtburg.htm
 

tullock

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Hi,
Thanks again for your comments. Below are just a few of the numerous quotes in the book describing the Army of Northern Virginia en-route to Gettysburg. The final quote describes the army retreating back to Virginia a few days after Gettysburg.


PICKETT’S INFANTRY DIVISION
June 3rd 1863

‘At Taylorsville Pickett’s division, fully equipped, was made ready for the most active field service.’

Corporal David E. Johnson
Company D. 7th Virginia Infantry Regiment

STUART’S CAVALRY DIVISION
June 5th 1863

‘At about ten o’clock the whole column, which was about two miles long, was ready and in splendid trim to pass in review.’

Corporal George M. Neese
Chewis Battery
PENDER’S INFANTRY DIVISON
June 22nd 1863

‘Their clothing is serviceable, so also are their boots, but there is the usual utter absence of uniformity as to color and shape of their garments and hats: gray of all shades and brown clothing, with felt hats, predominate.’

Lieut. Colonel A. J. L. Fremantle
Coldstream Guards
European Military Observer
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
June 25th 1863

‘Our army is very large…and in the finest trim you ever saw. Horses, mules and wagons in good order, men well clad and fed…’

Colonel David Wyatt Aiken
7th South Carolina Infantry Regiment

McLAWS INFANTRY DIVISION
June 25th 1863

‘All were well shod and efficiently clothed.’

Lieut. Colonel A. J. L. Fremante
Coldstream Guards
European Military Observer
2ND MARYLAND INFANTRY REGIMENT
June 26th 1863
‘On this day’s march an old man walked along talking to us. He said “They have been telling us you rebs were a ragged set, but you seem to have pretty good clothes…”’
Sergeant J. Wm Thomas
Company A. 2nd Maryland Infantry Regiment

RODES’ INFANTRY DIVISION
At Carlisle, Pennsylvania. En-route to Gettysburg
June 27th/28th 1863
“I may now mention some of the points as to which I think the legend has not its facts right. It describes, for instance, the invading army as “half starved” and “in rags” and its equipment as “worn out”. My eyes saw differently. I used them to advantage, going about freely, as a grown man might not have done…….
…….Where were those “ragged uniforms? ” those “half starved stragglers?” that “army of plight?”Our newspaper prophets of a speedy Confederate collapse through its army’s miseries must have been talking about some other army! The passing uniforms undergoing our inspection were if not new, newish; there being no showing of torn coats and badly frayed trousers……knapsacks and haversacks, the whole personal kit, was in order; arms were at every man’s command………The officer’s uniforms were of a light – gray cloth, the garniture a brilliant gold galloon; the private’s a dark gray with a few martial frills. Further opportunity for inspection of cavalry, infantry, artillery and the transportation service confirmed my first impression of a fit, well – fed, well conditioned army………. I certainly saw the Confederates not as “ragged” and “half – starved”……….
………Everything was moving along with the regularity of a well organized parade. By the time I got back home any notion I had had of seeing an army fortelling defeat by signs of impoverishment and exhaustion was dislodged from my mind. We had been fed on lies.”
James. W. Sullivan
Civilian Eyewitness
PICKETT’S INFANTRY DIVISION
June 27th 1863
‘The officers and men are all in excellent condition.’
Major General George E. Pickett

2ND NORTH CAROLINA INFANTRY REGIMENT
June 28th 1863
‘The citizens all express great astonishment at seeing us and our horses looking so sleek (and) fat. They thought to see us all of ragged and dirty skeletons… Our army is in fine condition and ready for any emergency.’
Lieutenant William Calder
Company F. 2nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment
PETTIGREW’S INFANTRY BRIGADE
June 1863

‘Pettigrew’s regiments were full, well clothed and well armed, altogether they were a fine body of men.’

Captain James S. Harris
Company B. 7th North Carolina Infantry Regiment

1ST SOUTH CAROLINA INFANTRY REGIMENT (HAGOOD’S)
June 1863
‘We were given new uniforms while here (Petersburg) and fixed up in pretty good shape.’

Private Frank M. Mixson
Company E. 1st South Carolina Infantry Regiment

RODES’ INFANTRY DIVISION
Late June 1863
‘This large body of men were three days in passing through our place, and they presented a most interesting and impressive sight…The men were in splendid condition and in high spirits.’

Thomas A. Ashby
Civilian Eyewitness
McGOWAN’S INFANTRY BRIGADE
June 1863
“In addition to this, we were in excellent health, and more properly equipped than at
any period prior or subsequent.”

J.F.J. Caldwell. The History of a Brigade of South Carolinians. Pages 95-96

IMBODEN’S CAVALRY BRIGADE
June 1863
‘Imboden’s brigade did not seem to have seen much hard service, at least I thought so because their clothes were new…’
John L. Collins
8th Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiment

CONFEDERATE PICKETS
RICHARD’S FORD VIRGINIA
June 1863
‘This was the first opportunity we had to become acquainted with the Confederates in a friendly manner at close range and it was a surprise, to some of us at least, to find these men quite like ourselves in a great many ways and not at all the “barbarians” some of our Northern journalists and orators had pictured them to be. They were clad in either butternut or grey clothes and were generally well dressed so far as comfort was concerned, but they did not present a very military appearance. Some wore hats of black, some of grey and some wore caps which we recognized as having been intended originally for use in the union army…’
Unidentified Union Soldier
146th New York State Volunteers

ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
AT WILLIAMSPORT, EN-ROUTE TO GETTYSBURG
June 1863
‘The men’s shoes are good and so are their clothes, though they look very coarse, being made from a yellowish- brown homespun.’
Captain Fitzgerald Ross
European Military Observer
55TH NORTH CAROLINA INFANTRY REGIMENT
June 1863
‘When the fifty-fifth regiment left the cars at Hamilton’s crossing, near Fredericksburg, to take its place in its brigade in Heth’s Division, A.P. Hills Corps, of the Army of Northern Virginia, it was both in respect to its discipline and its appearance one of the finest regiments in the army…The men of the regiment were well clad, and the ranks of each company were full… The regiment crossed the Potomac with the Army of Northern Virginia in fine spirits, and when it reached Cashtown on the night of 29 June, it was in splendid condition.’

Lieutenant Charles M. Cooke
Adjutant 55th North Carolina Infantry Regiment

26TH NORTH CAROLINA INFANTRY REGIMENT
June 1863

‘What a fine appearance the regiment made as it marched out from its bivouac near Fredericksburg that June morning. The men beaming in their splendid uniforms.’

Lieutenant George C. Underwood
Company G. 26th North Carolina Infantry Regiment

ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
(DURING THE RETREAT FROM GETTYSBURG)
July 1863

‘Provisions were plentiful, and the men were in excellent spirits.’

‘I was surprised to see how well the men were shod… Many a European army would have been half without shoes, but here there were few barefooted men, and during our halt these few were supplied by stores sent up from the rear. Almost all their boots and shoes are imported from England through the blockade.

Captain Fitzgerald Ross
European Military Observer

As one can see, the bulk of these descriptions are from trained military observers and not from ordinary Pennsylvania folk who were unused to seeing the plain, unadorned uniforms worn by Lee’s men.

Cavalrymen of the 5th Virginia Regiment captured at the Battle of Aldie. June 17th 1863



upload_2016-9-3_11-9-8.png

Most wear Richmond Depot jackets. One has frock coat uncannily similar to the one shown in the famous 'Sniper' photo at Gettysburg. Included in the main photo ( of which this is an enlarged segment),are several civilian dignitaries, including women, invited to stand in with the prisoners. Many historians have mistaken these civilians for soldiers.

Jeff
 
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Klaudly

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Drum major of the 114th Pennsylvania describes confederate prisoners, in dicembre1863:
"The prisoners here taken were better clothed than any we had before seen; all were provided with overcoat and jacket of much better material than our own. They were of english manufacture, and they furnished conclusive evidence of successful blockade runner."
 
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W. Richardson

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Hi Everyone,
I would like to thank you all for your interest. Over the next couple of days I will post several extracts from the book. Below is part of the introduction to the book.


In just one year, 1863, the huge amount of clothing listed below was distributed to just four Confederate regiments – 5th South Carolina Cavalry, 36th Virginia Infantry, 47th North Carolina Infantry and 63rd Georgia Infantry.

6223 Jackets and coats
8947 Pairs pants
7576 Pairs shoes and boots
8172 Shirts
7284 Pairs socks
7548 Pairs drawers
5504 Hats and caps

These were typical regimental issues to all Confederate units at this point in the War.

Still think Confederates were dressed in rags?




‘NEVER IN RAGS’, is the first volume in a groundbreaking nine volume series which covers, in great detail, the supply and issue of uniforms to the Confederate army during the Civil war. It is a unique and provocative work which challenges the myth of the ‘Ragged Reb’, utilizing period photos, numerous personal recollections, specially commissioned artwork and thousands of Regimental clothing issue tables.
This series of books finally lays to rest the fabled image of the ill-equipped, starving Reb and strongly promotes the finely clothed and generously supplied Confederate soldier.
Volume one covers the Eastern armies in 1863, Volume two Eastern Armies 1862, Volume three 1864. The Army of Tennessee and the Trans-Mississippi Department are covered in later volumes.

Below is one of the color plates and text.


Private. 9th Louisiana Infantry Regiment. January 1863

The hard drinking, hard fighting 9th Louisiana Infantry was a unit serving in Harry T. Hay’s Brigade. Throughout its service with the Army of Northern Virginia it received huge amounts of clothing on a regular basis. For example, between December 1862 and December 1863, the regiment, barely numbering 300-400 men, was issued 1090 jackets, 1839 pairs of pants, 1627 pairs of shoes, 1363 shirts, 967 pairs of socks, 1328 pairs of drawers, 378 caps and 44 hats. The other regiments in the Brigade received similar issues of clothing.
This soldier is wearing one of the 525 jackets issued to his regiment in December 1862, 240 of which were described as being ‘drab’ in color. Drab usually referred to undyed jean or wool cloth and could range in color from off-white to a light brown or dirty gray. His light blue jean cloth pants and plain gray cap are both Richmond Depot issue. His gray vest is a civilian item.
In the illustration the soldier is examining a Federal uniform recently acquired at Fredericksburg.


View attachment 109265

Looks to be a wonderful book. So you are suggesting that at no time were Confederate soldiers in tattered uniforms?

You dismiss all the sources (letters,diaries) that speak of being shoe less, or pants worn out, shirts with holes in them ? The many letters requesting clothing items from home?


6223 Jackets and coats
8947 Pairs pants
7576 Pairs shoes and boots
8172 Shirts
7284 Pairs socks
7548 Pairs drawers
5504 Hats and caps

These were typical regimental issues to all Confederate units at this point in the War.


Still think Confederates were dressed in rags?

Yes at times I do think so......................Too many sources telling us of how they were dressed and how they looked, sources from both sides.......................

Can you tell us what quality these items were? How long they lasted ?

Sounds like another attempt at myth making. "How well the CSA Armies were supplied and dressed"..............



Slanted.gif

Respectfully,
William
 
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AUG

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How to explain sources from that era that describe Confederate soldiers as dressed in rags?

Looking at the photographs of Confederate soldiers would quickly dispel any notion that they were universally ragged, but I wonder if using the word 'never' might be going too far in the othe direction.

Here is one example:

We were having our literary exercises on Friday afternoon, at our Seminary, when the cry reached our ears. Rushing to the door, and standing on the front portico we beheld in the direction of the Theological Seminary, a dark, dense mass, moving toward town. Our teacher, Mrs. Eyster, at once said:

'Children, run home as quickly as you can.'

"It did not require repeating. I am satisfied some of the girls did not reach their homes before the Rebels were in the streets.

"As for myself, I had scarcely reached the front door, when, on looking up the street, I saw some of the men on horseback. I scrambled in, slammed shut the door, and hastening to the sitting room, peeped out between the shutters.

"What a horrible sight! There they were, human beings! Clad almost in rags, covered with dust, riding wildly, pell-mell down the hill toward our home! Shouting, yelling most unearthly, cursing, brandishing their revolvers, and firing right and left.

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/gtburg.htm
I think it would depend on when and where. After hard campaigning there was no doubt that the typical Confederate soldier was dirty, dusty and probably smelled awful. Furthermore, digging and living in entrenchments would add even more dirt. I imagine that some men had partially torn clothing after hard marching and fighting, but they were issued new uniforms often enough to not be in "rags."

Here's an image of Confederate prisoners at White House Landing, captured during the Overland Campaign in June 1864. This was probably the typical appearance after hard campaigning. Scruffy, yes, but not in rags.
confederate-prisoners-cropped-jpg.jpg

http://civilwartalk.com/threads/confederate-prisoners-at-white-house-landing-va.119526/

Here's another image of Confederate prisoners captured at Five Forks, April 1865.
5321900031_06d31b8098_o.jpg

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/cwp2003005144/PP/
 

tullock

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england
Hi W. Richardson,
Thank you for your comments. I shouldn't rely on 'too many sources'. My book contains hundreds of clothing issue tables, based on 'requisition form 40', which company officers signed to certify that the clothing had been received and issued to their troops. All regiments received clothing quarterly and all forms show that all the clothing requested was received and issued. As to the durability of this clothing, that is easily answered. Surviving uniforms all tend to be of stout cloth and well manufactured. I have done numerous tests on exact cloth replicas and have found that the oft repeated myth that pants lasted just one month and jackets three is ludicrous. Well manufactured items last at least three times longer. Even if items started to wear out Confederate soldiers always had spares. Private James Barr Co I. 5th South Carolina Cavalry wrote to his wife on July 17th 1863

‘My Dear One, I would like very much to send some of my clothing home. I have entirely too many here for if we should move, it would be impossible for me to carry them unless the wagon would haul them. I have four pair of pants, four coats, four shirts and three flannel shirts (one is red flannel), five pairs of draws, three pair of socks, one cap and two hats.


Sgt Marion Hill of the 45th Ga. Inf. wrote to his wife on August 23rd 1863 stating

‘Do not send any clothes. I have as many as I can take care of.’

The following month Lt. Cheesley A. Mosman of the 59th Illinois Infantry observed the 6th South Carolina infantry in September 1863 and wrote

‘…a fine, handsome, stout lot of fellows, better dressed then we are, their uniforms being apparently new… The Carolinian’s uniform is a bluish gray…with sky blue pants.’

Even at a point in the war when Lee's men were supposed to be at their lowest ebb, at Antietam, a Union surgeon, James L. Dunn wrote "All this stuff about their extreme destitution is all bash....... I have yet to find a Rebel even meanly clad or shod. they are as well shod as our own men. They are dressed in gray. "
Jeff
 
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Package4

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Hi Richard,
Thank you for your comments. I shouldn't rely on 'too many sources'. My book contains hundreds of clothing issue tables, based on 'requisition form 40', which company officers signed to certify that the clothing had been received and issued to their troops. All regiments received clothing quarterly and all forms show that all the clothing requested was received and issued. As to the durability of this clothing, that is easily answered. Surviving uniforms all tend to be of stout cloth and well manufactured. I have done numerous tests on exact cloth replicas and have found that the oft repeated myth that pants lasted just one month and jackets three is ludicrous. Well manufactured items last at least three times longer. Even if items started to wear out Confederate soldiers always had spares. Private James Barr Co I. 5th South Carolina Cavalry wrote to his wife on July 17th 186

‘My Dear One, I would like very much to send some of my clothing home. I have entirely too many here for if we should move, it would be impossible for me to carry them unless the wagon would haul them. I have four pair of pants, four coats, four shirts and three flannel shirts (one is red flannel), five pairs of draws, three pair of socks, one cap and two hats.


Sgt Marion Hill of the 45th Ga. Inf. wrote to his wife on August 23rd statin

‘Do not send any clothes. I have as many as I can take care of.’

The following month Lt. Cheesley A. Mosman of the 59th Illinois Infantry observed the 6th South Carolina infantry and wrote

‘…a fine, handsome, stout lot of fellows, better dressed then we are, their uniforms being apparently new… The Carolinian’s uniform is a bluish gray…with sky blue pants.’

Even at a point in the war when Lee's men were supposed to be at their lowest ebb, at Antietam, a Union surgeon, James L. Dunn wrote "All this stuff about their extreme destitution is all bash....... I have yet to find a Rebel even meanly clad or shod. they are as well shod as our own men. They are dressed in gray. "
Jeff
Tullock, in your quotes you show the month but not the year, if it was 1861, that was understandable, but the idea that Confederate soldiers had spares is ludicrous, no diary that I have ever read talks about spares. Just about every diary speaks about one blanket, one gum blanket, one jacket one pair of trousers, one shirt and two pair of socks. In fact I just finished reading McCarthy's, Richmond Howitzers, diary "Detailed Minutia of Soldier Life" (I have his Richmond Depot Artillery Kepi, my avatar) and he tells of wearing everything he owned for months at a time, without washing, he would then throw everything away upon new clothing issue.
 

tullock

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Hi Package4,

I have just re-edited my last post. I should have quoted that they were all from 1863.
As to your statement that Confederate soldiers having spare clothing was a ludicrous I should read on. Pvt. Barr of the 5th South Carolina cavalry, cited above, wrote home frequently to complain about having far too much clothing (as did numerous other Confederate soldiers). In my book I back up these statements with hundreds of regimental clothing issue tables, all collated from the thousands of individual company clothing issue forms. (Requisition Form 40).Below are the issues to Barr's regiment in 1863....

5th SOUTH CAROLINA CAVALRY
CLOTHING ISSUE
DATE ISSUED

FEBRUARY, MARCH, APRIL 1863
TO 10 COMPANIES

ITEM NUMBER PRICE
JACKETS 100 (1)
COATS -
PAIRS PANTS 100 (2)
PAIRS SHOES 500
SHIRTS 250
PAIRS SOCKS 60
PAIRS DRAWERS 75
CAPS -
HATS -
OVERCOATS -
BLANKETS 59

NOTES
(1) DESCRIBED AS GRAY UNIFORM JACKETS
(2) DESCRIBED AS GRAY UNIFORM PANTS
DATE RECEIVED/ ISSUED

JULY, AUGUST, SEPTEMBER 1863
TO 10 COMPANIES

JACKETS 879 (1)
COATS -
PAIRS PANTS 1161
PAIRS SHOES 959
SHIRTS 1043 (2)
PAIRS SOCKS 1250
PAIRS DRAWERS 849 (3)
CAPS 17
HATS 864 (4)
OVERCOATS -
BLANKETS 50

NOTES
(1) SOME JACKETS DESCRIBED AS ‘GRAY’
(2) INCLUDES BOTH COTTON AND FLANNEL SHIRTS
(3) INCLUDES BOTH COTTON AND FLANNEL DRAWERS
(4) ALL THE HATS WERE FELT.
DATE RECEIVED/ ISSUED

OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, DECEMBER 1863
TO 9 COMPANIES

JACKETS 850 (1)
COATS -
PAIRS PANTS 1291 (2)
PAIRS SHOES 597
SHIRTS 337
PAIRS SOCKS 1087
PAIRS DRAWERS 620
CAPS 859 (3)
HATS 101 (4)
OVERCOATS -
BLANKETS 212

NOTES
(1) INCLUDES SEVERAL WOOL JACKETS
(2) INCLUDES SEVERAL PAIRS WOOL PANTS
(3) BLUE CLOTH CAPS WERE REQUESTED
(4) FELT HATS WERE REQUESTED.

I don't know Mr Reardon but I would love to meet up with him.All the uniforms shown in the book's color plates are from my own collection. I have, at present, over 250 full uniforms.
Jeff
 

Legion Para

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I don't know Mr Reardon but I would love to meet up with him.All the uniforms shown in the book's color plates are from my own collection. I have, at present, over 250 full uniforms.
Are you saying you own over 250 original full (complete) Confederate uniforms?
 
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tullock

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Hi 16th VA
Unit commanders would very often exaggerate the plight of their troops so as to procure extra clothing. In 1864 especially, Divisional Inspectors constantly complained about these type ruses. From November 1863 to February 1864 the Stonewall Brigade received large amounts of clothing from home, mainly shirts and socks. General uniform items were provided by the Brigade QM. From November 1863 until February 1864 the unit was issued the following items. 876 jackets, 1767 pairs pants, 1879 pairs shoes,1753 pairs drawers, 1855 shirts,644 pairs socks, 394 caps, 320 blankets and 251 overcoats. These items combined with the clothing sent from home would have left the troops in a comfortable position by February as the Brigade numbered less than 1000 men at this point. Other large clothing issue took place in March and April of 1864.
I noticed that the newspaper report didn't mention ragged clothing.
Regards Jeff
 
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Package4

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Hi Package4,

I have just re-edited my last post. I should have quoted that they were all from 1863.
As to your statement that Confederate soldiers having spare clothing was a ludicrous I should read on. Pvt. Barr of the 5th South Carolina cavalry, cited above, wrote home frequently to complain about having far too much clothing (as did numerous other Confederate soldiers). In my book I back up these statements with hundreds of regimental clothing issue tables, all collated from the thousands of individual company clothing issue forms. (Requisition Form 40).Below are the issues to Barr's regiment in 1863....

5th SOUTH CAROLINA CAVALRY
CLOTHING ISSUE
DATE ISSUED

FEBRUARY, MARCH, APRIL 1863
TO 10 COMPANIES

ITEM NUMBER PRICE
JACKETS 100 (1)
COATS -
PAIRS PANTS 100 (2)
PAIRS SHOES 500
SHIRTS 250
PAIRS SOCKS 60
PAIRS DRAWERS 75
CAPS -
HATS -
OVERCOATS -
BLANKETS 59

NOTES
(1) DESCRIBED AS GRAY UNIFORM JACKETS
(2) DESCRIBED AS GRAY UNIFORM PANTS
DATE RECEIVED/ ISSUED

JULY, AUGUST, SEPTEMBER 1863
TO 10 COMPANIES

JACKETS 879 (1)
COATS -
PAIRS PANTS 1161
PAIRS SHOES 959
SHIRTS 1043 (2)
PAIRS SOCKS 1250
PAIRS DRAWERS 849 (3)
CAPS 17
HATS 864 (4)
OVERCOATS -
BLANKETS 50

NOTES
(1) SOME JACKETS DESCRIBED AS ‘GRAY’
(2) INCLUDES BOTH COTTON AND FLANNEL SHIRTS
(3) INCLUDES BOTH COTTON AND FLANNEL DRAWERS
(4) ALL THE HATS WERE FELT.
DATE RECEIVED/ ISSUED

OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, DECEMBER 1863
TO 9 COMPANIES

JACKETS 850 (1)
COATS -
PAIRS PANTS 1291 (2)
PAIRS SHOES 597
SHIRTS 337
PAIRS SOCKS 1087
PAIRS DRAWERS 620
CAPS 859 (3)
HATS 101 (4)
OVERCOATS -
BLANKETS 212

NOTES
(1) INCLUDES SEVERAL WOOL JACKETS
(2) INCLUDES SEVERAL PAIRS WOOL PANTS
(3) BLUE CLOTH CAPS WERE REQUESTED
(4) FELT HATS WERE REQUESTED.

I don't know Mr Reardon but I would love to meet up with him.All the uniforms shown in the book's color plates are from my own collection. I have, at present, over 250 full uniforms.
Jeff
This does not prove that they carried extra gear, even for a cavalry regiment, the 5th SC was formed in Jan of 1863 and as such had a full compliment of men. The clothing issues you show actually bear out that there were very few extras. The 5th had enlistments of 1335. The average Confederate soldier did not carry extra clothing or anything that would encumber the march. These accounts are too numerous to mention. I would try and add one of your extra uniforms to a pack or blanket roll and march 17 miles in period brogans, with a full canteen and cartridge box. You will see how impractical the suggestion of extra clothing is. The annual Harper's Ferry to Sharpsburg march is almost upon us, my group has participated the last 10 years, of course we are weekend warriors, but it gives you an idea of what was practical to carry.

I am not disputing that they were not well supplied, but extras are a bit much to believe considering the research of both Jensen and Adolphus.
 

Legion Para

Captain
Retired Moderator
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Messages
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I have done numerous tests on exact cloth replicas and have found that the oft repeated myth that pants lasted just one month and jackets three is ludicrous. Well manufactured items last at least three times longer.
Please describe in detail the tests you performed.
 
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