New additions to Civil War book collection...

bayouace

Corporal
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Location
Louisiana
Its reality for we oldsters to wonder what will happen to our "stuff". I have restored over 200 mostly rusty, old kerosene tubular lanterns, some over a hundred years old. Given most to friends, family, museums, and a Little Theater, but still have over 50. My wife will keep a few, and my two sons a few. The remainder who knows where they will go. Like the book seller and many on CWT, we enjoy them while we're here.
 
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Pat Answer

Sergeant Major
Forum Host
Joined
Oct 8, 2013
Location
“...somewhere between NY and PA”
Its reality for we oldsters to wonder what will happen to our "stuff". I have have restored over 200 mostly rusty, old kerosene tubular lanterns, some over a hundred years old. Given most to friends, family, museums, and a Little Theater, but still have over 50. My wife will keep a few, and my two sons a few. The remainder who knows where they will go. Like the book seller and many on CWT, we enjoy them while we're here.

It's sad (as a bookworm anyway) to watch the age of the book seem to pass in general. But you are right - it all becomes archaeology one way or the other in the end!
 

Virginia Dave

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Location
Waynesboro, Virginia
Its reality for we oldsters to wonder what will happen to our "stuff". I have have restored over 200 mostly rusty, old kerosene tubular lanterns, some over a hundred years old. Given most to friends, family, museums, and a Little Theater, but still have over 50. My wife will keep a few, and my two sons a few. The remainder who knows where they will go. Like the book seller and many on CWT, we enjoy them while we're here.
Do you have any photos? Price plus shipping would be nice also if you are selling them.
 

bayouace

Corporal
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Location
Louisiana
Do you have any photos? Price plus shipping would be nice also if you are selling them.
Thanks, I don't sell them. Just put them in the hands of folks who appreciate American history and honor the hands that put food on the table from those lanterns. Many rural homes in Louisiana did not have electricity until the early 1950's.
Sorry, Pete, to get off topic.
 
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R. Porter

Private
Joined
Oct 6, 2020
All I can say is Wow! You could quit your job, put your feet up and read for a couple of years. It would probably take longer because once you started reading about individual battle and camp experiences you'd want to go to these places and see them for yourself. You'd want to take copies of illustrated sketches and photographs and match them up with places today. I hope your new place has a reading room with a fireplace and a big squishy chair with a foot rest and a reading lamp, and a door to the rest of the house you can shut.
 

Pete Longstreet

2nd Lieutenant
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Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 3, 2020
Location
Hartford, CT
All I can say is Wow! You could quit your job, put your feet up and read for a couple of years. It would probably take longer because once you started reading about individual battle and camp experiences you'd want to go to these places and see them for yourself. You'd want to take copies of illustrated sketches and photographs and match them up with places today. I hope your new place has a reading room with a fireplace and a big squishy chair with a foot rest and a reading lamp, and a door to the rest of the house you can shut.
I wish I could read about the Civil War for a living! It certainly will take me many years to read all the books I have... if I ever do. It's funny you mention "new place". I was looking at a house the other day and came upon a room that would make the perfect reading room. This was the view:

20210921_125938.jpg
 

Michael W.

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 19, 2015
Location
The Hoosier State
Any really good ones that stand out?
Yes! You have Shelby Foote's Civil War trilogy, that is pure gold. That covers the entire war and keeps you interested, not falling asleep like many other books do. If you have not read the trilogy before, you will love it, but since it's like 3,000 pages, it will take you awhile. Chancellorsville by Sears is excellent on that battle. And Battle Cry of Freedom by McPherson is good as well. Happy reading!
 

Pete Longstreet

2nd Lieutenant
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Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 3, 2020
Location
Hartford, CT
Yes! You have Shelby Foote's Civil War trilogy, that is pure gold. That covers the entire war and keeps you interested, not falling asleep like many other books do. If you have not read the trilogy before, you will love it, but since it's like 3,000 pages, it will take you awhile. Chancellorsville by Sears is excellent on that battle. And Battle Cry of Freedom by McPherson is good as well. Happy reading!
I've read Foote's trilogy, absolutely masterpiece. I have yet to read Chancellorsville or Battle Cry but will add them to my already long list.
 

FPT

Private
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
The photo is similar to an acquaintance that I made over the summer through CWT. My wife and I sold our house last Spring and are downsizing to a townhome (home is now expected to be completed next April). My wife gave me an ultimatum: get rid of many of my books, or face the wrath of she who must be obeyed.

After going through the books, I winnowed down the "losers" to eight boxes. Dave and I met on the way to Estes Park, transferred the boxes from my car to his, had a good conversation over some cherry pie at the Colorado Cherry Company and came home to a somewhat mollified spouse. Dave told me later that he picked some books for his use, his wife got some CD's with Fifties music (I needed to go through my CD collection at the same time) and the rest were being donated to the Estes Park library for sale.
 

Lubliner

Captain
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Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
A real treasure trove. The man said his grandkids would throw them out, but books never grow old, and he could have still been among them, it seems. Why did he sell his whole collection? Those have more sentimental value than just their age and topic, I think.
Lubliner.
 

Pete Longstreet

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 3, 2020
Location
Hartford, CT
A real treasure trove. The man said his grandkids would throw them out, but books never grow old, and he could have still been among them, it seems. Why did he sell his whole collection? Those have more sentimental value than just their age and topic, I think.
Lubliner.
I believe he was in his mid-late 80's and wanted to see them go to someone who would take care of them. He mentioned that if he just left them, they would end up in the trash, and he definitely didn't want that to happen.
 
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