Negro Confederate Skirmishers at Chancellorsville


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Carronade

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#86
This is just a thought I've had; for most of the war, Confederate law did not allow blacks to serve, but I wonder if some commanders might have bent the rules, like just not bothering to mention that a man on their muster roll was black or mixed-race. If a unit was short on manpower, and they had a man willing and able to fight, like the sharpshooters mentioned here, it must have been tempting to ignore the rules from the war department or politicians. A company recruited all from the same town might rationalize that "Joe may be a n*****, but he's one of ours". I doubt it could happen on a large scale, but we're talking about small numbers.
 

gary

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#87
I think it is more likely that they were besmooted Confederates who didn't have time to clean themselves up. I recall reading an account of Union white men who were so blackened that they were mistaken for colored men.
 

Robtweb1

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#88
I have a hard decision to make, plant flowers in my garden in the warm Alabama sunshine surrounded by my helpful cats or start a thread "Blacks Confederates in the ORs-Myth or Real" decisions decisions.
Glad to hear you have warm sunshine. We're still dripping faucets here in West TN. Supposed to be 23 tonight.
 
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#89
This is just a thought I've had; for most of the war, Confederate law did not allow blacks to serve, but I wonder if some commanders might have bent the rules, like just not bothering to mention that a man on their muster roll was black or mixed-race. If a unit was short on manpower, and they had a man willing and able to fight, like the sharpshooters mentioned here, it must have been tempting to ignore the rules from the war department or politicians. A company recruited all from the same town might rationalize that "Joe may be a n*****, but he's one of ours". I doubt it could happen on a large scale, but we're talking about small numbers.
Reminds me of this post-war account from the Louisville Courier Journal, where the servants wanted to fight and were allowed to do so.

FW4XNvv.jpg
 

JeffBrooks

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#92
Also, of course, Cleburne makes no reference to blacks already fighting for the Confederacy. His proposal is a lawyerly document that musters reasonable arguments in favor of recruitment. If he knew of black troops in the Confederate ranks, he would have mentioned them. He certainly discusses the use of black soldiers by the Union.
Exactly.
 

lelliott19

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#93
Should we bring up that Moses Dallas, "the Galant Dallas", was a black officer in the Confederate Navy?
never heard of the guy - got a link?
Moses Dallas - CSN Records indicate Moses Dallas piloted the C. S. Steamer Insondiga from August 1863 to June 3, 1864, when he was killed during the expedition which captured the U.S.S. Water Witch.

Name appears in Confederate Navy Subject File; Personnel; Complements; rolls, lists of persons serving in or with vessels or stations; Lists and registers as "Dallas, Moses. Pilot, (colored) killed in Water Witch expedition." His name appears in Confederate Navy Subject File; Personnel; Pilots; A-Miscellaneous - - as witness "In account with C. S. Steamer Isondiga." dated September 1, 1863. Name appears in OR Series I › 15 - South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-64 › Page 499 - - in telegram to Captain S. S. Lee, C. S. Navy, Captain in Charge, Richmond, Va. from Wm W Hunter, Flag Officer, Commanding Afloat, describing Dallas' death during the capture of the Water Witch.

Link to copies of relevant records from the National Archives
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/black-confederate-count.142783/page-44#post-1848001
 

Viper21

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Rockbridge County, Virginia
#94
Moses Dallas - CSN Records indicate Moses Dallas piloted the C. S. Steamer Insondiga from August 1863 to June 3, 1864, when he was killed during the expedition which captured the U.S.S. Water Witch.

Name appears in Confederate Navy Subject File; Personnel; Complements; rolls, lists of persons serving in or with vessels or stations; Lists and registers as "Dallas, Moses. Pilot, (colored) killed in Water Witch expedition." His name appears in Confederate Navy Subject File; Personnel; Pilots; A-Miscellaneous - - as witness "In account with C. S. Steamer Isondiga." dated September 1, 1863. Name appears in OR Series I › 15 - South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-64 › Page 499 - - in telegram to Captain S. S. Lee, C. S. Navy, Captain in Charge, Richmond, Va. from Wm W Hunter, Flag Officer, Commanding Afloat, describing Dallas' death during the capture of the Water Witch.

Link to copies of relevant records from the National Archives
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/black-confederate-count.142783/page-44#post-1848001
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fold3_page_499-jpg.jpg



capture-of-the-water-witch-jpg.jpg


moses-dallas-pay-jpg.jpg
 
Joined
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#97
My understanding is it was common, until recently, for Virginians to blacken their faces to impersonate African Americans.
I normally don't participate in these threads, but there are in fact some very good posts here. Let me share with you a small thing:

"The historian Robert C. Toll, the author of the book ''Blacking Up: The Minstrel Show in 19th-Century America,'' said minstrelsy started in New York in the 1840's with whites blackening their faces and presuming to portray blacks on stage."

Source: The New York Times, December 27, 1986.
 



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