Need pic of 3-band Springfield ramrod held in place.

Joined
Apr 19, 2019
Messages
26
#1
I have a Springfield/Bridesburg musket of 1863. Was about to order a new ramrod and see that this model may have used a ramrod spring.

Does anyone have a similar musket with a ramrod spring installed? I don't see any crosspin hole to hold the spring in place in my stock, but need to see exactly where to look.

My stock has a steel block inserted in the stock under the trigger guard/plate. I assume this is for the threaded end of the ramrod. Don't know if this was in addition to a ramrod spring or a design change to do away with the spring.

Google searches bring up plenty of photos of the spring, but not in situ.

Regards,

K
 

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#3
Ramrod spring? Never heard of one
The ramrod spring, or spoon was an internal mechanism in a musket that helped to hold the ramrod in place, basically if the wood has dried to the extant that it would not hold the ramrod in place. There is typically a pin in the stock, approximately 4" in front of the rear sight that keeps the spoon in place.
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#4
If your rifle musket is a Bridesburg 1863 marked lock then it is a contract model 1861 gun made by William Jenks, who produced 40,000 in 1863. The ram rod was retained by a swell in its diameter 5" behind the tulip head. The ram rod channel in the stock would have also been shaped to accomodate this swell. There should be no hole for the pin as there wasn't one. You will need a model 1861 swelled rod.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2019
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#6
The ramrod spring, or spoon was an internal mechanism in a musket that helped to hold the ramrod in place, basically if the wood has dried to the extant that it would not hold the ramrod in place. There is typically a pin in the stock, approximately 4" in front of the rear sight that keeps the spoon in place. View attachment 306740

View attachment 306733
That is exactly what I needed! I can see the cross pin clearly. Didn't realize the spring would have been so far back on the stock. I was looking up near the muzzle end.

I don't have that hole in the stock, so this must have been a rod with a swollen section near the tulip or cup.

Thank you very much for the assist. Now I know which version to order/make on the lathe.
 
Joined
Jul 14, 2019
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#8
Hi all, I am new to the forum and I am in the midst of restoring a badly neglected/modified 1863 springfield type 1 3 band musket. I have to restock the gun and would like a picture of the ramrod spring in place in a rifle. I need to install this in the new stock and have no template. Also could someone with this musket or info please provide the dimensions from the back of the butt plate (top) to the mortise's for each of the bands? Thanks much!
 

johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
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#11
How strange. Like Lanyard Puller I thought the US 1861 (regardless of year of manufacture or maker) did not use a spoon to retain the ramrod in the channel, that being the purpose of the swell below the tip of the ramrod.
Some M1861 Whitney used the spoon and an M1863 style ramrod instead of the swell.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2018
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Raccoon Ford, Virginia
#12
Strange coincidence?
I also am committing that very same sacrilege of restoring an 1863 Bridesburg.
I'm going for better than new getting the barrel relined with progressive twist and going to glass bed the stock.
My musket does have the pin in the stock and ram rod retaining spring.

I believe that Springfield changed the design in 1863.
The gun lost it's clean out screw in the bolster and the ram rod changed along with a couple of other subtle improvements.

Tell me where you got your new stock at... and I'll let you borrow my original to use as a template ; )
 



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