Need help identifying this weapon- new to CWT. Bought this at an auction. Would like to identify brand and model. Notice two leaf springs BETWEEN the

sammyt532004

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James N.

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it's an Austrian model 1854 Lorenz.
Thanks so much for your very quick response!
Welcome to the forums Sammy! There have been many threads on the Lorenz rifles in the forum; if you do a search for them you will find a lot of interesting information about your rifle, which as I recall was the second-most imported firearm on both sides after the British Enfield.
 

bayonet

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you should also show clear up close photos to include any marking, stampings, engravings, etc. Might ID a Unit or State or went North or South or make sure it's not a parts gun. The stock looks like its been through the ringer.
 

sammyt532004

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It's not in the best of shape. I'll share some more photos this evening.
Did I say thanks
I am really envious. My ancestors on both sides of the aisle carried Lorenzes; 5th Mo. (CS), and 10th MO (US). I'd love to have one.
And I feel extremely lucky to have tripped onto it. It's condition lacks overall but also overall it is basically there. I will continue to search its 'story'. It was among modern weapons in an estate sale. Something very interesting--- there is an object lodged in the barrel about halfway between the rear sight and the first forward band. Before it finds a place on my wall I really want to make sure it's safe. I have a date with a gunsmith to see if removal of whatever is possible. I'll post the results.
 

James N.

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Those "pin holes" in the stock are usually evidence of European powder-post beetle larva which bores into and eats wood; one of my French Revolutionary musketoons has them pretty badly. They had been plugged with wax and I didn't realize they were there, or at least how bad they were until I rather stupidly washed the stock to remove old oil, grease, etc. and they became glaringly obvious. Fortunately a coat of fresh linseed oil made them once again less apparent. To me this suggests that your Lorenz *may* have spent most of its life IN Europe where these little bast*rds are found - I'm not aware of similar insect pests on our continent. If so, like mine it could've come here much later and not have seen service in "our" war; maybe it was a G.I.'s "souvenir" after WWII.
 

bayonet

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Those "pin holes" in the stock are usually evidence of European powder-post beetle larva which bores into and eats wood; one of my French Revolutionary musketoons has them pretty badly. They had been plugged with wax and I didn't realize they were there, or at least how bad they were until I rather stupidly washed the stock to remove old oil, grease, etc. and they became glaringly obvious. Fortunately a coat of fresh linseed oil made them once again less apparent. To me this suggests that your Lorenz *may* have spent most of its life IN Europe where these little bast*rds are found - I'm not aware of similar insect pests on our continent. If so, like mine it could've come here much later and not have seen service in "our" war; maybe it was a G.I.'s "souvenir" after WWII.
correct me if I'm wrong but I heard some time ago that damage caused by insect holes here in the States would be along side the wood in lines not pin holed into the wood. Also heard long ago some unscrupulous characters would poke small holes into the wood to age it. Must be why I avoid collecting any damage in stocks that have them "holes".
 

sammyt532004

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correct me if I'm wrong but I heard some time ago that damage caused by insect holes here in the States would be along side the wood in lines not pin holed into the wood. Also heard long ago some unscrupulous characters would poke small holes into the wood to age it. Must be why I avoid collecting any damage in stocks that have them "holes".
I'm completely new to this ballgame of relic firearms. I've never owned anything this old--- if it is this old. Now my plans are to find family history, make it safe, leave it like it is and hang it on the wall to tell its story from time to time. I have zero plans to sell it but tell me folks--- what do you think this thing is worth in its present condition? You all have much more experience than myself--- Your opinion would be appreciated.
 

Jeff in Ohio

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correct me if I'm wrong but I heard some time ago that damage caused by insect holes here in the States would be along side the wood in lines not pin holed into the wood. Also heard long ago some unscrupulous characters would poke small holes into the wood to age it. Must be why I avoid collecting any damage in stocks that have them "holes".
Not correct. Do a search for "powder post beetles."
 
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sammyt532004

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Jun 13, 2021
Welcome, Sammy.
In your original post, you had no text. It appeared you tried to type everything in the Subject. Keep posting and practicing.

In your truncated statement, you mentioned two leaf springs. What are you referring to?
Thanks for replying-- I was referring to the two springs next to the bands. I've learned the answer to the original question. My weapon is an Austrian 1854 Lorenz
 
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