GRAPHIC Nasty head wound photo breaks internet. Squeamish and children faint! Banned in Boston. Congress throws shade. Etc.

Mike Serpa

Major
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
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Private John Parkhurst, Company E, Second New York Heavy Artillery,1865.
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Union Private Parkhurst received a gunshot wound to the head at Farmville, Virginia, in the final weeks of the Civil War. The ball fractured the upper portion of the soldier’s front bone, and he was removed to Harewood Hospital. Dr. Bontecou’s printed notes on the reverse of his card-mounted teaching photograph reveal that Parkhurst was fifty years old and that after treatment at the hospital his health progressed favorably. “Doing well,” Bontecou observed. The portrait is a good example of how at times the surgeon used enlargements to bring attention to a specific wound and its treatment. In this case, studying his patient from above, he also created a sublime document of medical recovery and human introspection.

Photo: Reed Brockway Bontecou (American, 1824–1907)

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/colle...s=19&ft=Civil+War&offset=40&rpp=20&pos=45
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
I'm practicing writing clickbait titles for Yahoo!

Private John Parkhurst, Company E, Second New York Heavy Artillery,1865.
View attachment 313609
View attachment 313611

Union Private Parkhurst received a gunshot wound to the head at Farmville, Virginia, in the final weeks of the Civil War. The ball fractured the upper portion of the soldier’s front bone, and he was removed to Harewood Hospital. Dr. Bontecou’s printed notes on the reverse of his card-mounted teaching photograph reveal that Parkhurst was fifty years old and that after treatment at the hospital his health progressed favorably. “Doing well,” Bontecou observed. The portrait is a good example of how at times the surgeon used enlargements to bring attention to a specific wound and its treatment. In this case, studying his patient from above, he also created a sublime document of medical recovery and human introspection.

Photo: Reed Brockway Bontecou (American, 1824–1907)

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/266768?&searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&deptids=19&ft=Civil+War&offset=40&rpp=20&pos=45

Report of Capt. Francis R. Humphreys, Second New York Heavy Artillery.

HDQRS SECOND NEW YORK ARTILLERY,
April 10, 1865.
CAPTAIN: I have the honor respectfully to report that the detailed account
of the operations of this regiment was kept by Maj. Selkirk, and carried
by him to the rear when he was wounded. I submit, however, the following
statement of our movements:

March 29, at 7 a.m. struck tents at camp near Patrick's Station; marched
about three miles, when a junction was formed with Sheridan's cavalry
about 11 a.m. four miles to the left of Hatcher's
Run, where we halted and threw up a line of breast-works in our front.
Left the works about 3.30 p.m.; formed in line of battle; marched
through a dense wood till night-fall, when we again halted and built
another line of works, which we held until 5 a.m. March 30, when
were made a further advance, under cover of the forest, halting about
9 a.m., when firing being heard on left threw up another line of works.
About 1 p.m. the enemy opened their batteries upon and continued a
sharp fire of shell and solid shot for about two hours, wounding two
privates. Remained in the works till 5 a.m. March 31, when we
resumed our march with the division to the relief of the Fifth Corps. At
6 p.m. halted; threw up a new line of works in our front; heavy firing
on our right and our left. Remained in the works until 4 a.m. April 1,
during which time had seven men wounded skirmishing, when we
retired a short distance to the rear, had inspection of arms, and
continued our advance in support of the Fifth Corps, throwing out
flankers, heavy firing being heard on the right and left. Camped at
night-fall at --------. April 2, continued our advance, skirmishing on
our right and front. One man wounded on the skirmish line. Crossed South
Side Railroad and camped for the night. April 3, continued our march
till 6 p.m., when went into camp near Lambeth Church. April 5, 6 a.
m. moved in the direction of the Danville railroad, which we struck
about 2 p.m. Continued the march to Burke's Station, to the right of
which we camped for the night. April 6, continued the advance. About
9 a.m. came in sight of the enemy's wagon train, moving rapidly
forward on our left. Pushed on till about 3 p.m., when we came up
with the enemy and his train about two miles from Farmville. After a
sharp engagement drove them from their position, capturing 2
battle-flags and-prisoners, the brigade taking 180 wagons and a large
number of prisoners. Camped here for the night. Casualties of the day,
3 enlisted men killed and 9 wounded. April 7, continued the advance;
passed through Farmville; crossed the Danville railroad at High Bridge;
met the enemy entrenched in a double line of works. At about 3 p.m.
charged with the brigade, and met with a repulse, resulting in a loss of
6 killed, 67 wounded, and 74 missing. Lay in rear of battle-field all
night. April 8, passed through the enemy's works, they having quietly
left during the night. Continued the advance till 11.30 p.m., when we
went into camp. April 9, marched to Clover Hill. Halted while flags of
truce were passing to and from the enemy. At 3 p.m. the surrender of

Gen. Lee announced. Went into camp for the night.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS R. HUMPHREYS,
Capt., Second New York Artillery, Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. WILLIAM McCALLISTER,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. LVIII.] THE APPOMATTOX CAMPAIGN. PAGE 720-95
[Series I. Vol. 46. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 95.]
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
I'm practicing writing clickbait titles for Yahoo!

Private John Parkhurst, Company E, Second New York Heavy Artillery,1865.
View attachment 313609
View attachment 313611

Union Private Parkhurst received a gunshot wound to the head at Farmville, Virginia, in the final weeks of the Civil War. The ball fractured the upper portion of the soldier’s front bone, and he was removed to Harewood Hospital. Dr. Bontecou’s printed notes on the reverse of his card-mounted teaching photograph reveal that Parkhurst was fifty years old and that after treatment at the hospital his health progressed favorably. “Doing well,” Bontecou observed. The portrait is a good example of how at times the surgeon used enlargements to bring attention to a specific wound and its treatment. In this case, studying his patient from above, he also created a sublime document of medical recovery and human introspection.

Photo: Reed Brockway Bontecou (American, 1824–1907)

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/266768?&searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&deptids=19&ft=Civil+War&offset=40&rpp=20&pos=45

John's pension index card. He filed in July, 1867. His widow filed in Feb.1879.

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Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Location
Hannover, Germany
@Mike Serpa , I think you don't need much further practise in writing clickbait titles... :D
Although I must admit ... one photo said more than 1000 words.
Each time I hear of those ghastly wounds I marvel at what the human body can take. I would not have bet that anybody could survive such a wound and even enjoy a "progress favorable".
Thanks for bringing him to our attention!
 

Waterloo50

Major
Forum Host
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Location
England
It’s pretty remarkable that this guy survived given that 90% of gunshots to the head are fatal, what we don’t know is if he suffered any cognitive damage or physical symptoms as a result of that serious head trauma. I have to say that the medics back then deserve a lot of credit.
 

TerryB

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Location
Nashville TN
He looks way too old to be a private! Do we have his DOB? Well, duh! I just saw the card says his age was 50. What the heck was he doing in the army at that age?
 
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