My Wife's Civil War Ancestry In Hodgenville, Larue County, Kentucky

Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
My wife's ancestry contains a rich Civil War history but she has never shared my interest in the "late unpleasantness" of the 1860s. Her mother was from southwest Virginia and her Civil War ancestors were Confederate for the most part. James Monroe Harris, Company D 37th Virginia lost a leg at Gettysburg and was one of Dr. Jame Hanger's (innovator of the artificial limb) first patients. Another 2 x great-grandfather, John Franklin Carter was one of the last members of the 64th Virginia to lay down his arms. When he surrendered in May 1865 at Cumberland Gap, the Yankees "confiscated" his horse. In 1921, the old "UN-reconstructed" Rebel went to court to attempt to recover the value of his horse.

Her Dad was born in Kankakee, Illinois in 1919, and grew up in Louisville, Ky. His parents were both raised in Hodgenville, Larue County, Kentucky near Lincoln's birthplace. His ancestors were Union in sentiment. Continuing Civil War and genealogy research recently led to this latest discovery in our family's history.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/161455197/thomas-crady

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/129949229/henry-c_-magruder

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/un...d-37th-ky-mounted-infantry.84834/#post-652069

The Crady family of Larue County are connected to the paternal side of my Father-In-Law's family tree. Several Crady men fought for the Union. One was Corporal Thomas Franklin Crady. Thomas enlisted 8/1/1863 at Louisville. He mustered into "D" Co. KY 33rd Infantry on 12/3/1863. He was transferred out on 4/1/1864 into "K" Co. KY 26th Infantry. He was Killed on 11/17/1864 at Hodgenville, KY while home on sick leave. He was gunned down by Confederate guerillas Henry Magruder and Sol Thompson, compatriots of the notorious "Sue Munday" troop that terrorized that part of Kentucky.

Marcellus_Jerome_Clarke.jpg


Marcellus Jerome Clark alias "Sue Munday"


Henry Magruder, Marcellus Clarke, and “one-arm” Samuel Berry in 1863..jpg


Henry Magruder, Marcellus Clark (Sue Munday), and "one-arm" Samuel Berry, about 1863.

thomas franklin crady.gif

Union Corporal Thomas Franklin Crady Company K 26th Kentucky Mounted Infantry.

richard lane crady.gif

Union Sergeant Richard Lane Crady of Company K 26th Ky. Either a brother or 1st cousin to Thomas.


Thirty-third Battalion Infantry
KENTUCKY
(3-YEARS)
Thirty-third Infantry. -- Lieut.-Col., James F. Lauck.

This battalion was organized and brought into the field under
many difficulties. It was made up of detachments recruited
for various different commands, thrown together and organized
at Munfordville, Ky., Sept. 13, 1862.

Co. A and about one-half of Co. B were recruited at Bowling
Green under authority to raise the 35th infantry. Co. C was
recruited for the 7th Ky. cavalry and had just joined the
regiment for muster-in at the period of the fight at Big Hill,
in which memorable struggle it participated, being among the
very last to leave the field, its gallant commander, Capt. Knight,
standing by Col. Metcalfe to the last.

Co. D and a portion of Co. B were recruited originally for the
33d. The recruits in camp at Munfordville participated in the
battle of Sept. 14, 1862, in which Chalmers' division was so
severely punished and signally repulsed in an attempt to
assault the Union works.

They were also in the fight of the 16th, which resulted in the
capitulation of the garrison after the main body of Gen.
Bragg's command had surrounded the works and cut off all hopes
of the arrival of reinforcements.

After the Confederate forces retreated from Kentucky these
recruits were again collected at Munfordville. Such of them
as had been paroled were sent to Camp Chase, where they
remained for several months awaiting an exchange which being
ultimately effected, and the recruits of the 35th having been
ordered to join them, the battalion was organized as stated
above, with Lieut.-Col. Lauck as commanding officer.

It remained on duty in Kentucky until April 1, 1864, when it
was consolidated with the 26th Ky. infantry and constituted
Cos. F, H, I and K of that regiment.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 339
..................................................................................................
Twenty-sixth Infantry
KENTUCKY
(3-YEARs)
Twenty-sixth Infantry. -- Cols., Stephen G. Burbridge, Cicero
Maxwell, Thomas B. Fairleigh; Lieut.-Cols., James F. Lauck,
Rowland E. Hackett; Majs., John L. Davidson, Joseph L. Frost,
Ignatius Mattingly, Cyrus J. Wilson, Francis M. Page, James H.
Ashcraft.

This regiment was recruited and organized by Col. Burbridge,
but as he was made brigadier-general June 12, 1862, he was not
long with the regiment. The companies came from the Green
River counties, and there was no place or road in all the
section of the state from Bowling Green to Henderson that was
not known to some of the men.

Arriving at the mouth of Green River after the fall of Fort
Donelson, the regiment passed up the Cumberland by the fallen
fortress and landed at Nashville just as Buell's army was
crossing the river into the city. At Nashville on March 5,
1862, it was regularly mustered by Maj. Bankhead.

Upon the second day at Shiloh it was engaged in heavy
fighting, as the casualties show, there being 7 killed,
including Maj. Davidson, and 60 wounded. After the battle of
Shiloh the regiment moved with the army to Corinth; took part
in the siege and skirmishing there; then moved to Tuscumbia,
Florence and Athens, Ala., and camped at Battle Creek, Tenn.

The regiment was but slightly engaged at Perryville. It
continued in pursuit of Bragg until he was out of the state
and then marched across the country to Nashville, where the
army, then under Gen. Rosecrans, was concentrated, Buell
having been relieved. Later the regiment was sent to Bowling
Green.

On Jan. 31, 1864, the members of the 26th reenlisted as
veterans and rendezvoused at Bowling Green in the spring where
on April 1 the 33d was consolidated with it, becoming Cos. F.
H, I and K. The regiment was mounted and used through the
entire spring and summer for the protection of Kentucky.

It then join›d the command of Gen. Burbridge for the raid to
the salt works, in Virginia. From the day it left Pikeville
until its return to that point it was in a continual fight.
On Oct. 29 it was ordered to Paducah. On Dec. 7 it went to
Nashville and was placed in the 1st brigade, 2nd division, 23d
corps.

It engaged in the battle of Nashville, moving with the 23d
corps under Gen. Schofield, and joining in the general charge
which broke up and destroyed Hood's army. Taking transports
at Clifton, Tenn., it proceeded down the Tennessee and up the
Ohio to Cincinnati, thence by rail to Washington, D. C., and
Alexandria, Va, then taking ocean steamer the regiment went
with the 23rd corps to Fort Fisher, N. C., arriving there in
Jan., 1865.

On the way to Wilmington the regiment fought at Fort Anderson
and Town Creek, and led by Col. Fairleigh was the first
regiment to enter Wilmington. It reached Raleigh and remained
there until the surrender of Gen. Johnston, when it was sent
to Salisbury, N. C., and encamped until it was ordered to
Kentucky. It was mustered out July 10, 1865, at Louisville.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 336

**********************************************************************************
 
Last edited by a moderator:

TnFed

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Very interesting. Always interested in Kentucky history of the war.

My ancestors on my Dad's side served in war on both Confederate and Union sides.
The civil war in Eastern Kentucky, Breathitt, Letcher, Perry, Owsley, Leslie and Wolfe counties, though not given much coverage, were the scenes of some of the most viscous and brutal guerrilla conflict. Partisans on both sides killing their foes and pillaging their homes. Some counties were more or less Union and some more or less Confederate. This fighting would continue a long time after 1865.
 

TnFed

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
I forgot to post my ancestors that fought in War were from Harrison and Mercer Counties.
Lol, sorry about that Donna. I was just thinking from reading your post about your family being divided during the War, they might just be from those counties I mentioned. My wife's family is from Letcher County. A particularly divided and dangerous place during the War. There was a trivia question awhile back about the Letcher County Giant....Martin Bates. Martin had a nephew named John Wright. He was known as Devil John Wright. He served on both sides during the War. Afterwards, he was in law enforcement . Though it was mostly the law of the gun. People said when he was after you, the devil was on your footsteps. He was married to six different women(at the same time) and had about 30 kids ...and fought a one man war against the local Klansemen. Though the 7 foot 5 inch giant, Martin Bates may be better known in history, it was his smaller than average nephew , Devil John, that was feared throughout that part of KY.
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
I also had great great grandfather who fought for Union who was from Franklin County. I have posted about him on forum. His name was Jesse Nichols.

My other great great grandfather who fought for the Confederacy was Nathaniel Cook. He was born in Harrison County. I have posted about him too on the forum.

My great great grandmother was Isabella Wright. She married my great great grandfather, James Wheat. They were from Mercer County. I have not proven whether he fought in war or not. I also have tried to find out if her brothers could have fought.
 

Virginia Dave

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Location
Waynesboro, Virginia
My wife's ancestry contains a rich Civil War history but she has never shared my interest in the "late unpleasantness" of the 1860s. Her mother was from southwest Virginia and her Civil War ancestors were Confederate for the most part. James Monroe Harris, Company D 37th Virginia lost a leg at Gettysburg and was one of Dr. Jame Hanger's (innovator of the artificial limb) first patients. Another 2 x great-grandfather, John Franklin Carter was one of the last members of the 64th Virginia to lay down his arms. When he surrendered in May 1865 at Cumberland Gap, the Yankees "confiscated" his horse. In 1921, the old "UN-reconstructed" Rebel went to court to attempt to recover the value of his horse.

Her Dad was born in Kankakee, Illinois in 1919, and grew up in Louisville, Ky. His parents were both raised in Hodgenville, Larue County, Kentucky near Lincoln's birthplace. His ancestors were Union in sentiment. Continuing Civil War and genealogy research recently led to this latest discovery in our family's history.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/161455197/thomas-crady

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/129949229/henry-c_-magruder

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/un...d-37th-ky-mounted-infantry.84834/#post-652069

The Crady family of Larue County are connected to the paternal side of my Father-In-Law's family tree. Several Crady men fought for the Union. One was Corporal Thomas Franklin Crady. Thomas enlisted 8/1/1863 at Louisville. He mustered into "D" Co. KY 33rd Infantry on 12/3/1863. He was transferred out on 4/1/1864 into "K" Co. KY 26th Infantry. He was Killed on 11/17/1864 at Hodgenville, KY while home on sick leave. He was gunned down by Confederate guerillas Henry Magruder and Sol Thompson, compatriots of the notorious "Sue Munday" troop that terrorized that part of Kentucky.

View attachment 213604

Marcellus Jerome Clark alias "Sue Munday"


View attachment 213598

Henry Magruder, Marcellus Clark (Sue Munday), and "one-arm" Samuel Berry, about 1863.

View attachment 213601
Union Corporal Thomas Franklin Crady Company K 26th Kentucky Mounted Infantry.


View attachment 213602
Union Sergeant Richard Lane Crady of Company K 26th Ky. Either a brother or 1st cousin to Thomas.



Thirty-third Battalion Infantry
KENTUCKY
(3-YEARS)
Thirty-third Infantry. -- Lieut.-Col., James F. Lauck.

This battalion was organized and brought into the field under
many difficulties. It was made up of detachments recruited
for various different commands, thrown together and organized
at Munfordville, Ky., Sept. 13, 1862.

Co. A and about one-half of Co. B were recruited at Bowling
Green under authority to raise the 35th infantry. Co. C was
recruited for the 7th Ky. cavalry and had just joined the
regiment for muster-in at the period of the fight at Big Hill,
in which memorable struggle it participated, being among the
very last to leave the field, its gallant commander, Capt. Knight,
standing by Col. Metcalfe to the last.

Co. D and a portion of Co. B were recruited originally for the
33d. The recruits in camp at Munfordville participated in the
battle of Sept. 14, 1862, in which Chalmers' division was so
severely punished and signally repulsed in an attempt to
assault the Union works.

They were also in the fight of the 16th, which resulted in the
capitulation of the garrison after the main body of Gen.
Bragg's command had surrounded the works and cut off all hopes
of the arrival of reinforcements.

After the Confederate forces retreated from Kentucky these
recruits were again collected at Munfordville. Such of them
as had been paroled were sent to Camp Chase, where they
remained for several months awaiting an exchange which being
ultimately effected, and the recruits of the 35th having been
ordered to join them, the battalion was organized as stated
above, with Lieut.-Col. Lauck as commanding officer.

It remained on duty in Kentucky until April 1, 1864, when it
was consolidated with the 26th Ky. infantry and constituted
Cos. F, H, I and K of that regiment.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 339
..................................................................................................
Twenty-sixth Infantry
KENTUCKY
(3-YEARs)
Twenty-sixth Infantry. -- Cols., Stephen G. Burbridge, Cicero
Maxwell, Thomas B. Fairleigh; Lieut.-Cols., James F. Lauck,
Rowland E. Hackett; Majs., John L. Davidson, Joseph L. Frost,
Ignatius Mattingly, Cyrus J. Wilson, Francis M. Page, James H.
Ashcraft.

This regiment was recruited and organized by Col. Burbridge,
but as he was made brigadier-general June 12, 1862, he was not
long with the regiment. The companies came from the Green
River counties, and there was no place or road in all the
section of the state from Bowling Green to Henderson that was
not known to some of the men.

Arriving at the mouth of Green River after the fall of Fort
Donelson, the regiment passed up the Cumberland by the fallen
fortress and landed at Nashville just as Buell's army was
crossing the river into the city. At Nashville on March 5,
1862, it was regularly mustered by Maj. Bankhead.

Upon the second day at Shiloh it was engaged in heavy
fighting, as the casualties show, there being 7 killed,
including Maj. Davidson, and 60 wounded. After the battle of
Shiloh the regiment moved with the army to Corinth; took part
in the siege and skirmishing there; then moved to Tuscumbia,
Florence and Athens, Ala., and camped at Battle Creek, Tenn.

The regiment was but slightly engaged at Perryville. It
continued in pursuit of Bragg until he was out of the state
and then marched across the country to Nashville, where the
army, then under Gen. Rosecrans, was concentrated, Buell
having been relieved. Later the regiment was sent to Bowling
Green.

On Jan. 31, 1864, the members of the 26th reenlisted as
veterans and rendezvoused at Bowling Green in the spring where
on April 1 the 33d was consolidated with it, becoming Cos. F.
H, I and K. The regiment was mounted and used through the
entire spring and summer for the protection of Kentucky.

It then join›d the command of Gen. Burbridge for the raid to
the salt works, in Virginia. From the day it left Pikeville
until its return to that point it was in a continual fight.
On Oct. 29 it was ordered to Paducah. On Dec. 7 it went to
Nashville and was placed in the 1st brigade, 2nd division, 23d
corps.

It engaged in the battle of Nashville, moving with the 23d
corps under Gen. Schofield, and joining in the general charge
which broke up and destroyed Hood's army. Taking transports
at Clifton, Tenn., it proceeded down the Tennessee and up the
Ohio to Cincinnati, thence by rail to Washington, D. C., and
Alexandria, Va, then taking ocean steamer the regiment went
with the 23rd corps to Fort Fisher, N. C., arriving there in
Jan., 1865.

On the way to Wilmington the regiment fought at Fort Anderson
and Town Creek, and led by Col. Fairleigh was the first
regiment to enter Wilmington. It reached Raleigh and remained
there until the surrender of Gen. Johnston, when it was sent
to Salisbury, N. C., and encamped until it was ordered to
Kentucky. It was mustered out July 10, 1865, at Louisville.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 336

**********************************************************************************
What county in southeast Virginia was your wife's mother from? My ancestors were from Patrick, Carroll (Grayson), Smith counties. What was her last name?
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
What county in southeast Virginia was your wife's mother from? My ancestors were from Patrick, Carroll (Grayson), Smith counties. What was her last name?

Her maiden name was Collins, her mother was a Harris from Scott County, in s.w.Virginia, bordering on east Tennessee. Her maternal grandmother was a Carter. The Collins in her family tree were actually from east Tennessee. They settled in Virginia right after the war. They were prime examples of east Tennessee folk that weren't so much pro-Union, as they were anti-Confederate. Would have liked to have been left alone. https://civilwartalk.com/threads/north-of-the-ohio-river.128841/
 
Last edited:

CCMDCSA

Sergeant
Joined
May 20, 2018
Location
Silver run Md carroll county
My wife's ancestry contains a rich Civil War history but she has never shared my interest in the "late unpleasantness" of the 1860s. Her mother was from southwest Virginia and her Civil War ancestors were Confederate for the most part. James Monroe Harris, Company D 37th Virginia lost a leg at Gettysburg and was one of Dr. Jame Hanger's (innovator of the artificial limb) first patients. Another 2 x great-grandfather, John Franklin Carter was one of the last members of the 64th Virginia to lay down his arms. When he surrendered in May 1865 at Cumberland Gap, the Yankees "confiscated" his horse. In 1921, the old "UN-reconstructed" Rebel went to court to attempt to recover the value of his horse.

Her Dad was born in Kankakee, Illinois in 1919, and grew up in Louisville, Ky. His parents were both raised in Hodgenville, Larue County, Kentucky near Lincoln's birthplace. His ancestors were Union in sentiment. Continuing Civil War and genealogy research recently led to this latest discovery in our family's history.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/161455197/thomas-crady

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/129949229/henry-c_-magruder

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/un...d-37th-ky-mounted-infantry.84834/#post-652069

The Crady family of Larue County are connected to the paternal side of my Father-In-Law's family tree. Several Crady men fought for the Union. One was Corporal Thomas Franklin Crady. Thomas enlisted 8/1/1863 at Louisville. He mustered into "D" Co. KY 33rd Infantry on 12/3/1863. He was transferred out on 4/1/1864 into "K" Co. KY 26th Infantry. He was Killed on 11/17/1864 at Hodgenville, KY while home on sick leave. He was gunned down by Confederate guerillas Henry Magruder and Sol Thompson, compatriots of the notorious "Sue Munday" troop that terrorized that part of Kentucky.

View attachment 213604

Marcellus Jerome Clark alias "Sue Munday"


View attachment 213598

Henry Magruder, Marcellus Clark (Sue Munday), and "one-arm" Samuel Berry, about 1863.

View attachment 213601
Union Corporal Thomas Franklin Crady Company K 26th Kentucky Mounted Infantry.


View attachment 213602
Union Sergeant Richard Lane Crady of Company K 26th Ky. Either a brother or 1st cousin to Thomas.



Thirty-third Battalion Infantry
KENTUCKY
(3-YEARS)
Thirty-third Infantry. -- Lieut.-Col., James F. Lauck.

This battalion was organized and brought into the field under
many difficulties. It was made up of detachments recruited
for various different commands, thrown together and organized
at Munfordville, Ky., Sept. 13, 1862.

Co. A and about one-half of Co. B were recruited at Bowling
Green under authority to raise the 35th infantry. Co. C was
recruited for the 7th Ky. cavalry and had just joined the
regiment for muster-in at the period of the fight at Big Hill,
in which memorable struggle it participated, being among the
very last to leave the field, its gallant commander, Capt. Knight,
standing by Col. Metcalfe to the last.

Co. D and a portion of Co. B were recruited originally for the
33d. The recruits in camp at Munfordville participated in the
battle of Sept. 14, 1862, in which Chalmers' division was so
severely punished and signally repulsed in an attempt to
assault the Union works.

They were also in the fight of the 16th, which resulted in the
capitulation of the garrison after the main body of Gen.
Bragg's command had surrounded the works and cut off all hopes
of the arrival of reinforcements.

After the Confederate forces retreated from Kentucky these
recruits were again collected at Munfordville. Such of them
as had been paroled were sent to Camp Chase, where they
remained for several months awaiting an exchange which being
ultimately effected, and the recruits of the 35th having been
ordered to join them, the battalion was organized as stated
above, with Lieut.-Col. Lauck as commanding officer.

It remained on duty in Kentucky until April 1, 1864, when it
was consolidated with the 26th Ky. infantry and constituted
Cos. F, H, I and K of that regiment.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 339
..................................................................................................
Twenty-sixth Infantry
KENTUCKY
(3-YEARs)
Twenty-sixth Infantry. -- Cols., Stephen G. Burbridge, Cicero
Maxwell, Thomas B. Fairleigh; Lieut.-Cols., James F. Lauck,
Rowland E. Hackett; Majs., John L. Davidson, Joseph L. Frost,
Ignatius Mattingly, Cyrus J. Wilson, Francis M. Page, James H.
Ashcraft.

This regiment was recruited and organized by Col. Burbridge,
but as he was made brigadier-general June 12, 1862, he was not
long with the regiment. The companies came from the Green
River counties, and there was no place or road in all the
section of the state from Bowling Green to Henderson that was
not known to some of the men.

Arriving at the mouth of Green River after the fall of Fort
Donelson, the regiment passed up the Cumberland by the fallen
fortress and landed at Nashville just as Buell's army was
crossing the river into the city. At Nashville on March 5,
1862, it was regularly mustered by Maj. Bankhead.

Upon the second day at Shiloh it was engaged in heavy
fighting, as the casualties show, there being 7 killed,
including Maj. Davidson, and 60 wounded. After the battle of
Shiloh the regiment moved with the army to Corinth; took part
in the siege and skirmishing there; then moved to Tuscumbia,
Florence and Athens, Ala., and camped at Battle Creek, Tenn.

The regiment was but slightly engaged at Perryville. It
continued in pursuit of Bragg until he was out of the state
and then marched across the country to Nashville, where the
army, then under Gen. Rosecrans, was concentrated, Buell
having been relieved. Later the regiment was sent to Bowling
Green.

On Jan. 31, 1864, the members of the 26th reenlisted as
veterans and rendezvoused at Bowling Green in the spring where
on April 1 the 33d was consolidated with it, becoming Cos. F.
H, I and K. The regiment was mounted and used through the
entire spring and summer for the protection of Kentucky.

It then join›d the command of Gen. Burbridge for the raid to
the salt works, in Virginia. From the day it left Pikeville
until its return to that point it was in a continual fight.
On Oct. 29 it was ordered to Paducah. On Dec. 7 it went to
Nashville and was placed in the 1st brigade, 2nd division, 23d
corps.

It engaged in the battle of Nashville, moving with the 23d
corps under Gen. Schofield, and joining in the general charge
which broke up and destroyed Hood's army. Taking transports
at Clifton, Tenn., it proceeded down the Tennessee and up the
Ohio to Cincinnati, thence by rail to Washington, D. C., and
Alexandria, Va, then taking ocean steamer the regiment went
with the 23rd corps to Fort Fisher, N. C., arriving there in
Jan., 1865.

On the way to Wilmington the regiment fought at Fort Anderson
and Town Creek, and led by Col. Fairleigh was the first
regiment to enter Wilmington. It reached Raleigh and remained
there until the surrender of Gen. Johnston, when it was sent
to Salisbury, N. C., and encamped until it was ordered to
Kentucky. It was mustered out July 10, 1865, at Louisville.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 336

**********************************************************************************
East TN as always good work
 

Virginia Dave

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Location
Waynesboro, Virginia
Her maiden name was Collins, her mother was a Harris from Scott County, in s.w.Virginia, bordering on east Tennessee. Her maternal grandmother was a Carter. The Collins in her family tree were actually from east Tennessee. They settled in Virginia right after the war. They were prime examples of east Tennessee folk that weren't so much pro-Union, as they were anti-Confederate. Would have liked to have been left alone. https://civilwartalk.com/threads/north-of-the-ohio-river.128841/
I have Carters in my family tree. I will need to research this a little closer. Thank you again.
 

AnnaLee

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 4, 2017
My wife's family is from Letcher County. A particularly divided and dangerous place during the War.

My family, on both sides, are from Letcher County, Ky & I was born there. I recently found out that my g-grandfather on mother's side, George Washington Tackett, was in the Union's 39th Volunteer Infantry Regiment. I imagine that there were family members who also fought for the Confederacy. Am still researching.
 

TnFed

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
My family, on both sides, are from Letcher County, Ky & I was born there. I recently found out that my g-grandfather on mother's side,George Washington Tackett, was in the Union's 39th Volunteer Infantry Regiment. I imagine that there were family members who also fought for the Confederacy. Am still researching.
You might be interested in checking out out "Caudills Army" about the 10th Kentucky Mounted Rifles CSA. Caudill was a Regular Baptist Minister. Did not slow down his fighting any.
 

TnFed

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Thanks for the information TnFed. I will certainly check out "Caudills Army".
You can get it by ordering it from the Col. Ben E. Caudill Camp No. 1629, SCV. My wife had an ancestor in the regiment that was able to ..eh..acquire a couple of fine race horses while with Caudill that he took back to Line Fork in Letcher County.
Caudill and his men engaged the Harlan Battalion..USA..in some pretty sharp engagements earlier in the war.
 

tellinghistory

Private
Joined
Oct 26, 2009
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
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