My latest finds at Half Price Books

Mark F. Jenkins

Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Location
Central Ohio
First, one that's been on my wish list for a while:

HMS Warrior, 1860: Victoria's Ironclad Deterrent by Andrew Lambert

But as I was leaving, I spotted the complete set of Samuel Eliot Morison's History of United States Naval Operations in World War II. Turned out to be a more expensive visit to the bookstore than I'd thought, but I'm okay with that!
 

Lincoln56

Corporal
Joined
Jul 24, 2016
Location
Texas
First, one that's been on my wish list for a while:

HMS Warrior, 1860: Victoria's Ironclad Deterrent by Andrew Lambert

But as I was leaving, I spotted the complete set of Samuel Eliot Morison's History of United States Naval Operations in World War II. Turned out to be a more expensive visit to the bookstore than I'd thought, but I'm okay with that!
Nice find on the Samuel Eliot Morison set! Have been picking them up one at a time when I find the price is reasonable; have a ways to go yet...
 

Lincoln56

Corporal
Joined
Jul 24, 2016
Location
Texas
I might have a spare copy of the volume on the invasion of France around here somewhere; I can't locate it at the moment, but is that one of the ones you are looking for?
Thank you for your offer sir; very much appreciated! The invasion of France is one that I do have.
 

Mark F. Jenkins

Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Location
Central Ohio
I'm working through Volume VI (Breaking the Bismarcks Barrier) and noticed something in Volume V (Guadalcanal)... Morison several times refers to Colonel Lewis Puller, but never as "Chesty." It wasn't that Morison didn't know him; Puller was the one who guided Morison around the Guadalcanal battlefield not long after the Japanese had pulled out (talk about an expert battlefield guide...). Was the nickname only acquired later on, or was it only used by Marines, or something?

Paging @redbob @Buckeye Bill @NFB22 or anyone else who may know... ?
 

RoadDog

Corporal
Joined
May 29, 2008
Location
The Great Midwest
My most favorite store to buy stuff these days. Always costs big bucks to go in there.
Wow! Books, CDs and LPs.

You're Talking RoadDog right there.

And, at my age I should be selling stuff, not buying more according to my wife.
 

redbob

Major
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Location
Hoover, Alabama
I'm working through Volume VI (Breaking the Bismarcks Barrier) and noticed something in Volume V (Guadalcanal)... Morison several times refers to Colonel Lewis Puller, but never as "Chesty." It wasn't that Morison didn't know him; Puller was the one who guided Morison around the Guadalcanal battlefield not long after the Japanese had pulled out (talk about an expert battlefield guide...). Was the nickname only acquired later on, or was it only used by Marines, or something?

Paging @redbob @Buckeye Bill @NFB22 or anyone else who may know... ?
There are two popular stories about how Lewis Puller went from Lewis to "Chesty", one was that he had a large barrel chest on his small frame (stories were that his original chest had been shot away and been issued with a steel one) and the second was that the term "Chesty" was an old Marine description of someone who was unusually "cocky". Regardless of how he got the name, he will always be known as a "Marine's Marine". Also, just as a sidelight; in 1970 when I was in Marine Corps Bootcamp, every night at lights out; we would lie at attention in our bunks and at the top of our voices shout: Goodnight Chesty Puller, wherever you are.
 
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NFB22

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Location
Louisville, KY
I'm working through Volume VI (Breaking the Bismarcks Barrier) and noticed something in Volume V (Guadalcanal)... Morison several times refers to Colonel Lewis Puller, but never as "Chesty." It wasn't that Morison didn't know him; Puller was the one who guided Morison around the Guadalcanal battlefield not long after the Japanese had pulled out (talk about an expert battlefield guide...). Was the nickname only acquired later on, or was it only used by Marines, or something?

Paging @redbob @Buckeye Bill @NFB22 or anyone else who may know... ?

It's been years since I read his biography by Burke Davis which I know explained the different hypotheses as to how he acquired the nickname but I do know it was most widely used by enlisted Marines so perhaps that's why Morison refers to him in the proper as a fellow officer.

It's also a sign of respect. For instance, we all knew Jim Mattis had the nickname "Mad Dog" but we still referred to him as General Mattis.
 
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